TAG: "Women’s health"

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay opens


Large-scale transport completed with support of city of San Francisco agencies.

More than 130 patients were carefully transported from Parnassus and Mount Zion campuses to the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay on Feb. 1. (Photo by Noah Berger)

>>Related: UCSF Medical Center at Parnassus and Mount Zion to expand care

>>Related: President Bill Clinton tours new UCSF hospitals

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

With 40 ambulances, approximately 300 UCSF staff and faculty, as well as 100 emergency medical services personnel, UCSF Medical Center on Sunday, Feb. 1,  safely transported 131 patients to the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay from its Parnassus and Mount Zion campuses.

The move day started at 7 a.m. on the UCSF Parnassus campus; later in the day patients also were transported from the UCSF Mount Zion campus. The last patient to be moved arrived at UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay at 3:33 p.m. The new medical center also greeted the first baby born at the new hospitals, a healthy boy who entered the world at a little more than seven pounds.

The opening of the new hospitals was the culmination of more than 10 years of planning and construction of the complex, which includes UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital, UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital and the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building.

The move day, itself, reflected significant planning. “Patient safety was our top priority during the patient move, along with minimizing disruption to our neighbors. We achieved both goals, thanks to the superb work of our medical center faculty and staff as well as our partners in the City of San Francisco,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “We have been looking forward to this day for some time, and the opportunity to start providing care in our new location at UCSF Mission Bay.”

The majority of patients who made the trip on Sunday were children, as UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco moved from Parnassus to its new home at UCSF Mission Bay.

Strategically located on UCSF’s world renowned UCSF Mission Bay biomedical research campus, the new medical center puts UCSF physicians in close proximity to UCSF researchers and nearby biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Mission Bay and beyond who are working to understand and treat diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease to neurological conditions.

“Placing the hospitals on our Mission Bay campus underscores our commitment to driving discoveries toward patient care, ensuring that our world-class researchers are working in close proximity to our leading clinical researchers and physicians in the hospitals,“ said Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., chancellor of UC San Francisco.  “They also will provide invaluable training for our medical students, the next generation of clinicians who will take care of patients at health care facilities across California and nationally.

“Significantly, the move also frees up space on our Parnassus and Mount Zion campuses, which will allow us to enrich our medical programs for adult patients there. With the opening of the hospitals at Mission Bay, we now have integrated clinical care and research programs on all of our campuses, the critical factor that has contributed to UCSF’s local, regional and global impact.”

The UCSF Parnassus campus will be restructured to provide more specialized clinical services, such as transplants, and the UCSF Mount Zion campus will become a world-class hub for outpatient care.

“UCSF Medical Center’s new $1.5 billion, state-of-the-art campus in our city’s Mission Bay neighborhood will help improve the health of children, women and cancer patients,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. “This is not just a milestone for UCSF; this is a milestone for our city and our city’s health care industry, which is at the heart of our economy providing good jobs for our residents.

“Right before our eyes, we have seen the transformation of this underutilized railyard in Mission Bay into an epicenter where new discoveries and innovation in medicine are saving lives around the world. By working together with our great partner UCSF, and the many generous philanthropists that helped build these new hospitals, we will continue to ensure our residents get the highest quality of health care.”

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California breast density law slow to have an impact


UC Davis research demonstrates need for more physician education.

Jonathan Hargreaves, UC Davis

By Dorsey Griffith, UC Davis

Ten months after California legislators enacted a controversial law mandating that radiologists notify women if they have dense breast tissue, UC Davis researchers have found that half of primary care physicians are still unfamiliar with the law and many don’t feel comfortable answering breast density-related questions from patients. The findings, to be published in the March print edition of Journal of the American College of Radiology, suggest that if the law is going to have any significant impact on patient care, primary care providers need more education about breast density and secondary imaging options.

“Overall, the impact of the breast density legislation probably is not significant if  primary care physicians are not educated or aware of it,” said lead author Kathleen Khong, a UC Davis radiologist and staff physician. “We should put some emphasis on educating the primary care physicians so that when they get questions from patients, they can be comfortable in addressing the issues.”

The California law, which took effect in April 2013, requires that patients whose breast density is defined as “heterogeneously dense” or “extremely dense” (about 50 percent of women), receive the following notification:

“Your mammogram shows that your breast tissue is dense. Dense breast tissue is common and is not abnormal. However, dense breast tissue can make it harder to evaluate the results of your mammogram and may also be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. This information about the results of your mammogram is given to you to raise your awareness and to inform your conversations with your doctor. Together, you can decide which screening options are right for you. A report of your results was sent to your physician.”

The researchers point out that breast density has long been a required part of any radiological report following mammography, but unless a patient asks to see the report, the information is shared only with the patient’s providers. Led by patient advocates, the legislation is intended to increase awareness of dense breasts and encourage patients to discuss the clinical issues with their doctors. According to published research, 28 states have passed, rejected or considered dense-breast notification legislation since 2009.

But the UC Davis study demonstrated that while women and their doctors are receiving the notifications, many of those physicians are unclear about what to do with the information. As a consequence, the researchers said, it appears that relatively few patients with dense breasts are asking questions about their breast density and its implications.

The UC Davis study surveyed 77 physicians about the new law.  Roughly half (49 percent) reported no knowledge of the legislation and only 32 percent of respondents noted an increase in patient levels of concern about breast density compared to prior years. In addition, a majority of primary care physicians were only “somewhat comfortable” (55 percent) or “not comfortable” (12 percent) with breast-density questions from their patients.

Khong said their survey results were surprising, but acknowledged that many primary care physicians may not feel they have sufficient training to make a clinical recommendation for a particular type of secondary screening. In fact, the study also found that 75 percent of respondents would like more education about the breast-density law and its implications for primary care.

“They are eager to learn and want to help their patients and be part of something positive as a result of this,” Khong said.

Jonathan Hargreaves, assistant professor of clinical radiology and a study co-author, said, for example,  that if a patient has dense breasts she should have a risk assessment, which takes into account her family history of breast cancer, biopsy history and other factors to determine whether a supplemental screening is warranted. Once  complete, the physician should then discuss the potential benefits and risks of supplemental imaging in determining the most appropriate approach for the patient. The use of ancillary screening in addition to mammography is a complex subject and still the subject of considerable debate, explained Hargreaves.

Tomosynthesis, known as 3-D mammography, is one supplemental test that breast radiologists generally agree provides a slight benefit for women with dense breasts over a standard mammogram and can be scheduled for the next annual mammographic screening appointment after receiving a notification. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is another secondary imaging option, Hargreaves said, but is generally only used for screening in women who have a very strong family history of breast cancer or have a known high-risk gene, such as BRCA.

“The law has raised a lot of awareness about breast density,” Hargreaves said. “That being said, mammography screening is the primary thing patients need to do, and beyond that, the real benefits of other screening techniques are still the subject of ongoing medical debate.”

Khong and Hargreaves hope to validate their findings by expanding their research to include primary care physicians from other major university health care systems in California.

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UCSF, CMC sign letter of intent to increase pediatric, women’s health services


Collaboration to expand services in Valley would build on foundation of existing relationship.

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

UCSF Medical Center and Community Medical Centers (CMC) have signed a letter of intent (LOI) to expand women’s and children’s services to the Central Valley, which has an undersupply of specialists for a growing population. The collaboration also would broaden medical education services in the area.

CMC, a Fresno-based regional health system, owns and operates Community Regional Medical Center (CRMC) and other licensed general acute care hospitals and outpatient centers in Fresno and Clovis that serve Fresno County and the surrounding counties.

“The delivery of health care is changing. We’re going to rely on medical information technology and strong alliances with private and academic physicians to more efficiently manage the health of entire families. This project with UCSF will be a key part of that,” said Craig Wagoner, CEO at Community Regional Medical Center.

The shared vision of CMC and UCSF includes development of a clinically integrated health system to facilitate better sharing of information in order to manage patient health; improved access to high-quality pediatric services in Fresno and surrounding communities; higher acuity pediatric services at CRMC to reduce the need for patients’ families to travel outside of Fresno; and increased integration of the academic and training missions of UCSF and CRMC.

An immediate goal for 2015 is to increase the availability of specialists at CRMC by this summer.

UCSF School of Medicine, which consistently is ranked among the nation’s top medical schools, has for decades operated a graduate medical education program in collaboration with Community, the San Joaquin Valley’s largest hospital organization.

About 300 UCSF medical residents and fellows currently practice on the Community Regional Medical Center campus, which is the Valley’s Level 1 trauma center. Pediatrics is one of 22 specialties currently offered in the Fresno-based graduate medical education program.

The collaboration among UCSF Fresno, CRMC and Valley Children’s Healthcare has afforded UCSF residents the ability to receive high-quality residency training across the entire spectrum of pediatric needs within a diverse set of clinical settings. UCSF remains firmly committed to maintaining and strengthening this long-time, top-ranked pediatric residency program for the benefit of patients, the community and the entire San Joaquin Valley.

“This is the next logical step in our relationship with Community,” said Michael Peterson, M.D., interim associate dean for UCSF Fresno. “The medical school is committed to serving the Valley, and our leadership team in San Francisco is excited about the opportunity to partner with the Community Regional Medical Center and build a leading-edge women’s and children’s program.”

“We have a great relationship with Fresno and the Central Valley, and this partnership with Community Medical Centers will strengthen that relationship,” said Stephen Wilson, M.D., Ph.D., associate chief medical officer for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco. “This is an opportunity to better integrate our women’s and children’s services in the region and support UCSF’s mission to provide care to patients in areas that are underserved.”

UCSF has been providing services in Fresno for decades. Established in 1975 and now celebrating its 40th anniversary, the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program plays a substantial role in providing health care services to residents of California’s San Joaquin Valley and training medical professionals in the region. A clinical branch of UCSF, the Fresno medical education program has trained approximately one-third of Central San Joaquin Valley physicians.

Faculty and medical residents at UCSF Fresno engage in a broad spectrum of research addressing health issues pertinent to the Valley. Faculty and residents also care for the overwhelming majority of the region’s underserved populations at health care facilities like CRMC.

In addition, UCSF Fresno provides academic preparation programs for middle- and high school students interested in the health professions through the Junior Doctors Academy and the Doctors Academy. UCSF Fresno academically prepares students at Fresno State to become competitive applicants to health professional schools and ultimately aims to prepare them for careers in health and medicine. UCSF Fresno also is a key partner in the UC Merced San Joaquin Valley Program in Medical Education.

The collaboration is anticipated to be finalized in the fall of 2015.

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UCSF receives $40M gift for new Medical Center at Mission Bay


Outpatient medical building to be named in honor of the Ron Conway family.

CSF Medical Center's new outpatient building, located on 16th Street, will be named the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building in honor of the family $40 million gift. Some outpatient clinics will begin opening on Jan. 26. (Photo by Cindy Chew)

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

UC San Francisco has received a $40 million gift from angel investor and philanthropist Ron Conway, his wife Gayle, and sons Ronny, Topher and Danny, to help fund the outpatient medical building at the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, which opens on Feb. 1 on UCSF’s world-renowned biomedical research campus. The outpatient medical building, a 207,500-square-foot facility that anchors the hospital complex, will house outpatient services for women, children and cancer patients.

In honor of the Conways’ generosity, UCSF will name the outpatient building the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, a result of more than 10 years of planning and construction, comprises UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital and UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital. The new facilities include a 289-bed hospital complex, with children’s emergency and outpatient services that will integrate research and medical advancements with patient-focused, compassionate care.​

Ron Conway is the founder of SV Angel and has worked with hundreds of startups including Google, Facebook, Zappos, Square, Airbnb, Dropbox, Pinterest  and Twitter. He also is a board member of the Salesforce.com Foundation and actively supports the tech civic organization sf.citi, College Track, Sandy Hook Promise, Americans for Responsible Solutions, Teach for America, THORN and Donors Choose.

“Ron and Gayle have been true partners with UCSF for more than a decade, and we are extremely grateful for their ongoing support. This building is significant for the connection it provides between the high-quality medical care patients will receive at our three specialty hospitals as inpatients, and the groundbreaking continuing care they will receive as outpatients,” said Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., chancellor of UCSF.

Ron Conway is a member of the UCSF Medical Center Campaign Cabinet and served on the UCSF Foundation Board for several years. He has been a generous fundraiser for and philanthropist to UCSF and in particular, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco.

He also has been an active supporter of neurodegenerative disease research and treatment, through the UCSF Neuroscience Initiative, which brings together under one roof outstanding scientists and clinicians from multiple disciplines – and the core technologies that they need to be successful.

“Ron is known as an ‘angel’ investor, and that description certainly holds true for his passion to better the lives of patients at UCSF,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “As a public medical center, we depend on the generosity of people like Ron and Gayle to continue serving the patients of San Francisco as well as Northern California and beyond. The Conways have been generous not just through financial gifts but with their time, introducing UCSF to their colleagues throughout the technology sector and Silicon Valley in order to advance our mission of care, research and education.”

The UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building is expected to draw more than 1,500 outpatient visits daily, as well as serve as a teaching facility for students. It includes a cancer clinic and women’s health clinic, and pediatric clinic. Some outpatient clinics will begin opening on Jan. 26.

The new medical center, strategically located on UCSF’s 60.2-acre Mission Bay research campus, will enhance UCSF’s ecosystem of innovation by putting physicians in close proximity to researchers and near biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Mission Bay and beyond. The new cancer hospital, for example, will sit near the UCSF Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, where every day leading scientists are seeking causes and cures for cancer.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay also will feature the only operating hospital helipad in San Francisco to transport critically ill babies, children and pregnant women to the medical center from outlying hospitals.

“Gayle and I are proud to partner with UCSF to improve the health of the Bay Area. We have watched UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay grow from a concept to a magnificent hospital complex, and can think of no better investment than supporting patients who are accessing needed outpatient medical services,” Ron Conway said. “We encourage others to get involved with the new medical center philanthropically, as well as other programs at this leading institution.”

The total $1.5 billion cost of the Mission Bay Hospitals Project has been funded by UCSF Medical Center financing and private philanthropy. Of the $600 million fundraising goal, UCSF has raised $550 million.

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Birth control shot linked to moderately increased risk of HIV infection


UC Berkeley findings have potentially broad implications.

By Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley

A large meta-analysis of 12 studies in sub-Saharan Africa found that women who used a type of injectable birth control had a moderately increased risk of becoming infected with HIV.

The contraceptive, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, is sold under the brand name Depo-Provera, and it is administered as a shot every three months.

The findings, published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, included data from 39,500 women. The researchers selected the studies based upon methodological rigor, such as whether they accounted for the use of condoms.

In addition to Depo-Provera, the studies also examined other commonly prescribed forms of hormonal contraception, such as the injectable norethisterone oenanthate (sold as NET-EN), combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only pills. The other birth control methods did not appear to increase HIV infection risk for women in the general population.

“We embarked on this study because of the inconsistency in the scientific literature on this topic,” said study lead author Lauren Ralph, who did this research for her UC Berkeley Ph.D. dissertation in epidemiology. “The results have potentially broad implications because hormonal contraceptives remain popular for women worldwide.”

Approximately 144 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception, and of those about 41 million women use injectable forms of birth control instead of the pill.

The study found that women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate had a moderate, 40 percent increased risk of acquiring HIV compared with women using non-hormonal methods and those not practicing birth control. The increased risk was slightly lower, 31 percent, among the studies done in women in the general population.

It remains unclear why the increased risk was seen among those using Depo-Provera but not the other forms of hormonal contraception, the authors said. One possibility may be that birth control with higher levels of progestin, the synthetic form of the natural hormone progesterone, changed the vaginal lining or altered local immunity, increasing the risk for HIV infection, though the researchers emphasized that this study did not examine the physiological effects of the different contraceptive methods and more research on potential underlying biologic mechanisms is needed.

The researchers cautioned that the increased HIV infection risk needs to be considered in the context of the risks associated with not using birth control.

“We do not believe that the findings merit withdrawal of this method of birth control for most women,” said Ralph. “There are significant risks associated with pregnancy and childbirth as well. It can be tricky to ensure a reliable supply of contraceptives in sub-Saharan Africa. Removing Depo-Provera doesn’t mean the women will have immediate access to other methods of birth control that are as effective. Ultimately, decisions around which birth control method to use should be made between a woman and her healthcare provider.”

The researchers noted that the results highlight the need for more studies among high-risk populations.  Among the 12 studies analyzed, only two included sex workers or women with HIV-positive partners.

“The most important next steps for women all over the world are to examine ways to broaden women’s contraceptive options and increase uptake of other safe and effective contraceptive methods, and to step up research on new contraceptive methods, especially those that protect against both HIV and pregnancy,” said senior author Nancy Padian, a UC Berkeley adjunct professor of epidemiology.

Other co-authors of this study are Sandra McCoy, a UC Berkeley assistant adjunct professor of epidemiology, and Karen Shiu, who was a research analyst in Padian’s research group at the time of the study.

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Preeclampsia during mother’s pregnancy linked with greater autism risk


Likelihood of autism diagnosis even greater if mother experienced more severe disease.

By Phyllis Brown, UC Davis

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more than twice as likely to have been exposed in utero to preeclampsia, and the likelihood of an autism diagnosis was even greater if the mother experienced more severe disease, a large study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.

Women with preeclampsia experience hypertension during the latter half of their pregnancies, and may have increased levels of protein in their urine and edema, or fluid retention. Preeclampsia can develop into eclampsia, a life-threatening condition in which seizures may occur.

The study was conducted in more than 1,000 children between the ages of 2 and 3 years enrolled in the Childhood Risks of Autism from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study in Northern California. It is published online today in JAMA Pediatrics.

Cheryl Walker, UC Davis

“We found significant associations between preeclampsia and ASD that increased with severity. We also observed a significant association between severe preeclampsia and developmental delay,” said Cheryl Walker, study senior author, assistant professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine and a researcher affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute.

While preeclampsia has previously been examined as a risk factor for autism, the literature has been inconsistent. The current study provides a robust population-based, case-controlled examination of the association between autism and preeclampsia and whether risk was associated with preeclampsia severity.

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Major complication rate after abortion is extremely low, study shows


UCSF research is first to use complete data on post-abortion care.

By Laura Kurtzman, UC San Francisco

In the most comprehensive look yet at the safety of abortion, researchers at UC San Francisco have concluded that major complications are rare, occurring less than a quarter of a percent of the time, about the same frequency as colonoscopies.

The study, published today in Obstetrics & Gynecology, analyzed data from more than 50,000 women enrolled in the Medi-Cal fee-for-service program who obtained abortions from 2009 to 2010, and looked for complications that occurred within six weeks of the procedure.

The rate is similar to what has been found in previous studies, but this is the first study in which researchers have based their conclusions on complete data on all of the health care used by women who have received abortions. Since some women must often travel long distances to find abortion providers, they tend to receive follow-up care at facilities closer to where they live. For many women, this means their local emergency department. But, up until now, no study has systematically examined emergency department use for post-abortion care.

The researchers said they expect the study will contribute to the national debate over abortion safety. Many state legislatures have recently passed laws that have the effect of reducing access to abortion by requiring providers to have transfer agreements or admitting privileges with hospitals or to construct their clinics so that they meet the requirements of an ambulatory surgical center. But the researchers said that these restrictions were likely to make women travel further to get abortions or induce them on their own using unsafe methods, both of which may increase the risks for women.

“Our study had very complete follow-up data on all of the women in it, and we still found a very low complication rate,” said Ushma Upadhyay, Ph.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor at Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), a program of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at UCSF. “Abortion is very safe as currently performed, which calls into question the need for additional regulations that purportedly aim to improve safety.”

California is one of 17 states that cover abortion and follow-up care for women enrolled in Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor. Billing data from the Medi-Cal fee-for-service program gave researchers a complete picture of all the health care that women received in the six weeks following their abortion procedures.

California has more than 500 abortion providers, most of them practicing in an outpatient setting, and 97 percent of the abortions studied were performed in an outpatient clinic or a doctor’s office. Only 3 percent were performed in hospitals.

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Developing a noninvasive test for endometriosis


UCSF researchers ID patterns of genetic activity that could help in early detection of disorder.

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure.

The study is online in the journal Endocrinology.

“This promising molecular diagnostic approach would not have been possible without advances in genomics and bioinformatics,” said senior author Linda Giudice, M.D., Ph.D., distinguished professor and chair of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at UCSF.

“Importantly, there are relatively few genes in each ‘classifier’ of disease or of no disease and endometriosis stage that have the potential for non-surgical diagnostic development,” Giudice continued. “The approach also could be used to detect disease recurrence without requiring surgery, and the newly identified gene profiles and pathways resulting from this approach have opened doors for innovative targeted therapy development for endometriosis-related pain and infertility.”

Endometriosis is an often painful condition that occurs when tissue normally lining the inside of the uterus grows outside the uterus.

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Building the future of health care


More than 1,000 donors give $131M in support of UC San Diego Jacobs Medical Center.

By Judy Piercey and Jade Griffin, UC San Diego

Committed to fostering the future of health care in San Diego, more than 1,000 donors have contributed $131 million to UC San Diego’s Jacobs Medical Center. Included in the total are gifts that matched a donation of $25 million, meeting the Challenge goal of the initiative.

Today (Nov. 20), the campus announced that the Challenge donation, originally anonymous, was made by Joan and Irwin Jacobs. They provided a $75 million lead gift for the new facility in 2010; with the Challenge gift, that brings their contributions to the Jacobs Medical Center to a total of $100 million. Continued private support will help fund the completion of the new medical center, which is the largest hospital project currently underway in Southern California.

Under construction and projected to open in 2016, Jacobs Medical Center is a $839 million, 10-story facility on the university’s La Jolla campus, which will include three new clinical care units in one location: The A. Vassiliadis Family Hospital for Advanced Surgery, The Pauline and Stanley Foster Hospital for Cancer Care and the Hospital for Women and Infants.

“We are deeply grateful to Joan and Irwin Jacobs for their generosity, including the recent $25 million match challenge,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “We also thank Carol Vassiliadis and Pauline Foster, who made leadership gifts, as well as all of the other donors who participated in meeting this challenge. These visionaries support UC San Diego’s commitment and vision to create a healthier world through new science, new medicine and new cures.”

“Jacobs Medical Center is part of a multibillion dollar university investment in the future of health care for the region,” said Dr. David A. Brenner, vice chancellor for Health Sciences and dean of the UC San Diego School of Medicine. “I want to thank all of the donors who have helped make this extraordinary medical center a reality.”

Irwin and Joan Jacobs

“When we came here in 1966, the medical school was just starting,” said Irwin Jacobs, co-founder, former chairman and CEO of Qualcomm Inc. and UC San Diego founding faculty member, who served as a professor in electrical and computer engineering from 1966 to 1972. “There was no hospital, just a school. So it’s very exciting to make Jacobs Medical Center possible. More and more, we’re learning how to bring results from basic research in biology and engineering to medicine, and to the clinic. I think this medical center is going to show how effective that can be. The innovations will spread out from San Diego, and go all around the world.”

The 509,500-square-foot facility will house 245 patient beds and be connected on multiple floors with the existing John M. and Sally B. Thornton Hospital on UC San Diego’s La Jolla campus, in the heart of the area’s nexus of biomedical research centers. Jacobs Medical Center has been designed with the patient in mind. From spacious private rooms to soothing color schemes and artwork, to next-generation medical equipment, the vision and needs of patients, doctors and nurses, all aspects of the Jacobs Medical Center have been fully integrated. Each floor will combine all the necessary healing elements while achieving optimal safety and efficient delivery of care.

“Soon we will have the largest, most technologically advanced hospital in the region, dedicated to offering specialized care for every kind of patient, in every phase of life,” said Paul Viviano, CEO of UC San Diego Health System.

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UCSF Mission Bay hospital complex to open Feb. 1


Three new hospitals for women, children and cancer patients.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay will open Feb. 1, 2015. (Photo by Mark Citret)

After more than 10 years of planning and construction, UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay will open Feb. 1, 2015 on UC San Francisco’s world-renowned biomedical research campus. UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay comprises UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital and UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital. The new facilities include a 289-bed hospital complex, with children’s emergency and outpatient services that will integrate research and medical advancements with patient-focused, compassionate care.​

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay will welcome its first patients the morning of Feb. 1, when teams of health care professionals and ambulances begin moving some inpatients from the UCSF Parnassus campus and Mount Zion campus into the new facilities.

The new medical center, strategically located on UCSF’s 60.2-acre Mission Bay research campus, will enhance UCSF’s ecosystem of innovation by putting physicians in close proximity to researchers and near biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Mission Bay and beyond. The new cancer hospital, for example, will sit near the UCSF Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, where every day leading scientists are seeking causes and cures for cancer.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay also will feature the only operating hospital helipad in San Francisco to transport critically ill babies, children and pregnant women to the medical center from outlying hospitals.

“UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay profoundly advances our ability to fulfill our mission as a public hospital, providing high-quality health care that meets the future needs of the entire Bay Area,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO, UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “By embedding clinical care within our research enterprise at Mission Bay, UCSF physicians and scientists in the forefront of cancer medicine, and women’s and children’s health will be able to more readily translate discoveries into next-generation therapies and cures.”

Each of the new hospitals’ designs reflects significant input from patients and families, as well as clinicians.

“UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay sets a national benchmark for patient- and family-centered health care by offering an unparalleled healing environment that supports and connects patients and their families during hospital stays,” said Cindy Lima, executive director, UCSF Mission Bay Hospitals Project. “These new hospitals expand our capacity to provide the most advanced treatments in buildings that reflect input from the people who will use them.”

The hospitals feature state-of-the art technology, including the world’s largest hospital fleet of autonomous robotic couriers which will deliver linens, meals and medications. Interactive media walls in each private room will enable patients to communicate with their families and clinicians, and an imaging suite specially designed to eliminate anxiety during an MRI offers children the chance to virtually experience a San Francisco trolley ride, or to play with a cast of animated critters as they boat around the San Francisco Bay.

Distinctive features of UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay include 4.3 acres of green space and 1.2 acres of rooftop gardens, soothing art- and light-filled interiors and a public plaza created in partnership with the City of San Francisco. In addition, UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay is on target to be one of the first LEED Gold-certified hospital in California.

The Integrated Center for Design and Construction brought together more than 200 architects, engineers and contractors working side by side in a command center on the construction site. Construction of the hospitals began in December 2010.

“The healing power of UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay extends beyond the hospitals’ walls, as clinicians and researchers work side by side to accelerate medical breakthroughs and transform the delivery of health care in this country,” said Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., chancellor of UC San Francisco. “It’s important to note that the hospital complex was built only through the generous philanthropic support of the Bay Area community, who share our vision of advancing health care across the world. We are greatly appreciative of their unwavering commitment to our mission over the past decade. ”

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, one of the nation’s leading children’s hospitals, provides treatment for virtually all pediatric conditions, as well as for critically ill newborns. The Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco was one of the first of its kind in the world. The hospital is the only California state-designated children’s medical center in San Francisco and is affiliated with UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland.

The new 183-bed facility at Mission Bay creates an environment where children and their families find quality care at the forefront of scientific discovery. Private rooms in the intensive care nursery support the youngest patients, while the fully accredited classroom and teachers enable school-age patients to continue their education while focusing on their health. The hospital offers accommodations for families of pediatric patients and nearby lodging for those requiring longer stays.

UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital

UCSF ranks consistently among the top cancer care centers in the nation, according to the “America’s Best Hospitals” survey from U.S. News & World Report. UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital sets the standard in personalized care, delivering advanced cancer therapies tailored to individual patient needs. The hospital increases UCSF’s inpatient and outpatient capacity to meet growing demand, in a state-of-the-art facility. The new hospital will absorb many of the cancer surgery beds currently located at UCSF Medical Center at Mount Zion, offering cancer surgeries in specialties ranging from urology and orthopedics, to head and neck and gynecologic oncology. Specialists also serve the individual needs of cancer patients from the children’s and women’s hospitals. In the future, Mission Bay could house as many as 250 or more surgery beds, with a full complement of outpatient cancer care services.

UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital

As the region’s first dedicated women’s hospital, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital will embody the philosophy of the UCSF National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health. The new hospital will deliver care that addresses health needs across a woman’s lifetime, including cancer treatment, specialty surgery, a 36-bed birth center, nine deluxe labor and delivery rooms, and select outpatient services. Customizing care to each patient, the hospital will provide the best available diagnostic tests and treatments in a caring, women- and family-focused environment that incorporates the latest technology. Spacious rooms allow loved ones to spend the day or night comfortably.

Each labor and delivery room is designed to be respectful to patients and families during the life-altering event of childbirth. Combining sophisticated technical capabilities with carefully considered design choices, each room emits a sense of calm for the birthing experience. At the same time, it is a highly functional space for clinicians to provide quality care.

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Bridge builder


Ellen Olshansky excels at forging bonds between university, community health organizations.

“My goal is to build partnerships with community-based groups,” says Ellen Olshansky, professor and founding director of nursing science at UCI. “I want to ask ‘How can we work together?’ It’s the difference between doing research ‘with’ and doing research ‘on.’” (Photo by Steve Zylius, UC Irvine)

Since joining UC Irvine in 2007 to launch the nursing science program, Ellen Olshansky has flourished as a highly respected county leader for community-based research and women’s health policy. And much of it started at her kitchen table five years ago.

There, in her University Hills home, Olshansky brought together Susan Bryant and Karol Gottfredson of UCI and Allyson Sonenshine and Stephanie Kight of Planned Parenthood of Orange & San Bernardino Counties to share ideas about what they could do to champion women’s health issues. Brainstorming over white wine, cheese and crackers, they outlined what would become the Orange County Women’s Health Project.

With aggressive planning and outreach by these five women, the OCWHP kicked off in 2011. In May 2012, it hosted the inaugural Orange County Women’s Health Policy Summit, at which a UCI alumna presented “A Snapshot of Women’s Health in Orange County” – the first-ever such survey.

The project’s partners have since formed task forces for breast and cervical cancer, teen reproductive health, and health and domestic violence. The work is paying dividends: Earlier this year, Blue Shield awarded the OCWHP $2 million to establish a countywide, integrated and collaborative system that will strengthen healthcare response to domestic violence and streamline service.

“Ellen was instrumental in getting the project off the ground – introducing the vision and doing the outreach and creating momentum,” says Sonenshine, OCWHP director. “We’ve developed a wonderful model that’s focused on data analysis, policy and education, and we play an increasingly important role.”

Now Olshansky is applying her bridge-building talents at UCI’s Institute for Clinical & Translational Science.

Supported by a prestigious Clinical & Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health, the ICTS is dedicated to advancing efforts to turn scientific discoveries into new methods, treatments and cures to improve public health. One of its most important objectives is community engagement, and that’s where Olshansky comes in.

“My goal is to build partnerships with community-based groups,” she says. “I want to ask ‘How can we work together?’ It’s the difference between doing research ‘with’ and doing research ‘on.’”

ICTS Director Dr. Dan Cooper says Olshansky is the perfect person at the perfect time to lead the community engagement push.

“Ellen has a long history of collaborating with the community, and her work is based upon having real dialogue and understanding among groups that don’t always speak the same language,” Cooper says. “She has remarkable skills in translating and expressing to faculty the community needs that impact health directly. Being a facilitator between these two groups is invaluable to us.”

To boost outreach, the ICTS is a founding partner of the Orange County Alliance for Community Health Research, which consists of the leaders of local, community-based organizations; practicing physicians; healthcare agencies; governmental representatives; community groups; and UCI researchers.

The alliance’s purpose is to create an infrastructure in Orange County that increases the ability of community organizations and universities to engage in health research that’s designed by the community to meet the needs of the community. Olshansky serves on its advisory board.

“At the heart of the alliance is the belief that the community first expresses its health needs, and then university researchers work with these partners to find solutions,” she says. “That’s what community-based research is all about, and I’ll be working diligently to further establish those relationships in Orange County.”

Earlier this year, Olshansky stepped aside from directing UCI’s Program in Nursing Science, where over seven years she oversaw the initiation of the bachelor’s program and the approval and initiation of the master’s and doctoral programs. She also spearheaded the effort to include nurse practitioner concentrations in the master’s program.

And during a recent sabbatical, Olshansky put the finishing touches on her latest book, Women’s Health & Wellness Across the Lifespan. Set for release on Dec. 11, it offers a historical and comprehensive look at women’s health – politically, socially, legally and medically – through contributions from leading experts across the country.

“This book is important because it explains the reasons why it’s necessary to have a focus on the issue of women’s health,” Olshansky says. “There has been such political push-back on sexual and reproductive health services, and we need to be sure that we continue to provide and strengthen these services.

“But many people believe that’s all women’s health is about. In fact, it’s much more than that, and this book goes in depth into the many other important issues women face. It’s written mostly for primary care physicians and nurse practitioners, but I believe anyone interested in women’s health will benefit from reading it.”

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Betting big on women, girls


Melinda Gates explains Gates Foundation’s strategy to lift countries out of poverty.

Melinda Gates talks with NPR’s Morning Edition co-anchor Renee Montagne about the source of her passion for improving conditions for people in undeveloped countries.

By Peggy McInerny, UCLA

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is betting big on women and girls to help developing countries lift themselves out of poverty, foundation co-chair Melinda Gates told a UCLA audience that filled Korn Convocation Hall on Nov. 5.

Gates sat down to talk with NPR’s Morning Edition co-anchor Renee Montagne at the 2014-2015 Arnold C. Harberger Distinguished Lecture on Economic Development of the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations. Co-sponsored this year by UCLA’s Center for World Health and the Health and Human Rights Law Project of the School of Law, the annual event is intended to bring economic policy experts to discuss their views with UCLA students and faculty.

UCLA Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics Harberger, who founded and supports the lecture series, was in attendance. A pioneer in the field of development economics, he has trained scores of Latin American economists over his 30 years at UCLA, where he continues to teach.

Gates has worked assiduously to restore contraception to a major place on the global health agenda. Her efforts in this direction led to the 2012 London Summit on Family Planning, which brought together donors, national governments and the development community from around the world. The summit adopted the goal of providing contraception to 120 million women in the developing world by 2020.

Today, 15 developing nations have created national family planning action plans. “We funnel our money through those action plans,” said Gates, which includes support at both the policy and the project levels.

Yet, said the speaker, she quickly realized that contraception alone could not resolve culturally ingrained gender inequality. Soon she began to advocate a holistic approach to cultivate the “other half” of the population of developing countries and, in the process, reduce poverty levels and promote economic growth.

Gates’ focus on gender inequality has led the Gates Foundation to “bet big” on three core areas: health, decision making power and economic empowerment. Saying she saw incredible opportunities in these areas to change things for the better for women and girls, she emphasized that the contributions of many individuals to these causes could create palpable change in our lifetimes.

Gates went even further, saying that development as a whole needs to be looked at through a gender lens. She explained, for example, that agricultural projects often do not take into account that the primary farmers in many countries are women, who frequently seek to avoid cash crops because they lose power over cash resources.

Longstanding development data show that investments in women’s health and education lead to smaller families with healthier, better-educated children. Where women have economic opportunity and decision-making power over resources, more of those resources are also invested in their families, promoting overall economic development.

“We need men and boys in the conversation on all of these issues,” said Gates. Only by educating men first about how contraception and women’s access to economic resources benefit the health and well-being of their children and their wives, she emphasized can these things become culturally acceptable. Moreover, the way in which health education is delivered must be culturally appropriate and respond to gender-specific circumstances.

Focusing on solving today’s problems

The Gates Foundation, which has an endowment of $42 billion and has already disbursed over $30 billion in grants, is focused on solving contemporary problems of the present generation — and perhaps the next — said the speaker.

The development aid provided by the foundation is not intended to endure indefinitely, noted Gates. Neither is the foundation itself. She and her husband do not expect it to have a shelf life much beyond their own — perhaps 15–20 years at most. “We want to spend our energy and our lives doing this work for the problems of today’s society,” she remarked.

“We are trying to build capacity now, so we can funnel more and more resources through those mechanisms,” she explained. “[And] as we learn what mechanisms work in one area, we take them and try to apply them to other areas.”

At present, the foundation is deeply engaged in the health sector in developing countries, supporting vaccination programs, building governmental and human capacity in health care, and developing ways to measure the impact of interventions, particularly those designed to improve gender inequality.

“The way that Bill and I think about this is that the only role [of] a foundation is to be a catalytic wedge,” said Gates. That is, foundations are able to take the risks needed to prove what does and doesn’t work. “But,” she added, “it takes government money to scale those things up.”

After helping create a global Vaccine Alliance (known as Gavi) and raising replenishment funds for it among wealthy nations, the Gates Foundation is now asking developing countries to make contributions to vaccination programs in their countries. Over time, these contributions are expected to increase until the programs become fully funded by those nations.

As a result of these programs, Gates noted that the governments of Ethiopia and Nigeria had built out basic-level primary health care systems in the form of “health posts.” (Ethiopia has built 15,000 such centers.)

“With basic supplies to help people and with basic trained health workers, usually two women, you can get unbelievable changes in maternal and child mortality,” observed Gates. The big lesson of the Ebola crisis is that investing in this primary level of health care provides an institutional bulwark against contagious diseases, which she predicted would continue to arise in perhaps more virulent form, she noted.

Nigeria, for example, was able to contain Ebola because after the first cases were reported, one of its polio clinics (supported by the Gates Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) was transformed into an Ebola emergency response clinic. Not only was the clinic able to trace the origin and spread of the disease in the country, the government was able to distribute appropriate behavior change messages throughout the system of health posts. In contrast, Liberia’s health system rapidly collapsed in the face of the Ebola crisis, having been greatly weakened by two decades of civil war.

Participating as an interlocutor, not an observer

Gates reflected that it was a great privilege to be able to travel for the foundation and learn firsthand about the concerns of men and women in the developing world. She traced her passion to making a difference in the world to the values of her parents, who encouraged all four of their children to attend college despite the serious financial burden this goal would impose.

A practicing Catholic, Gates said she attended a Catholic high school, but sought to transfer to an academically superior school in order to get into a good college. It took a while, she said, to understand that her parents sent her to the Catholic school because they believed in its values. “I was out serving in the courthouse … in the hospital, in a school two miles down the road,” she remarked. “These very liberal nuns showed us that we could make a change in the world.”

Asked if she had gotten pushback from Catholics about her support for contraception in developing nations, Gates said she had received surprisingly little criticism from people of faith. On the other hand, she noted, push back from Rome had been expected.

Whenever she travels to a development conference, the speaker said she makes a point to stop somewhere in Africa and meet people on the ground to remind herself what the work is about. Similarly, she takes a day or two to decompress after long stays in developing countries to let the stories she has heard wash through her, experience the grief sparked by them and decide what she wants to do.

“You don’t go to these countries and not let your heart break,” she said.

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