TAG: "Women’s health"

CDC New Investigator Award goes to UC San Diego scientist


Jamila Stockman to receive award for domestic violence research.

Jamila Stockman, UC San Diego

By Bonnie Ward, UC San Diego

Jamila K. Stockman, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of medicine and global public health at the UC San Diego School of Medicine has been selected to receive the Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award. The national award, presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Foundation and Futures Without Violence, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending violence against women and children, recognizes an outstanding early career scientist working in the field of domestic violence.

“Jamila is a superb scientist, as demonstrated by her multiple National Institutes of Health grants, but this award really represents her commitment to use science to improve the lives of women living with violence, as well as to prevent violence,” said Anita Raj, Ph.D., professor of medicine and global public health and founding director of the Center on Gender Equity and Health at UC San Diego.

The Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award, presented every other year, recognizes an exceptional new investigator with two to 10 years of experience working in the field of domestic violence, violence against women or dating violence.

Stockman will receive the award during the National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence to be held March 19-21 in Washington, D.C.

An infectious disease epidemiologist, Stockman focuses her work on social and environmental factors contributing to intimate partner violence, particularly among low-income ethnic minority and substance abusing women. Along with exploring the factors influencing partner violence, Stockman seeks to create new and improved violence intervention strategies.

In addition to Stockman, UC San Diego scientist Elizabeth Reed, Sc.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of medicine and global public health, was also a finalist for the award.

Raj said the recognitions reflect the excellence and commitment of both researchers. “We at UC San Diego are enormously proud of these two scientists who, though early in their careers, are making important contributions in the field.”

One of Stockman’s current projects involves promoting safety planning strategies for methamphetamine-addicted women at risk for lethality by their intimate partner, who often have nowhere to turn during a crisis. Another effort looks at how underlying social and neighborhood environments, as well as an altered stress response, can influence behavioral risks for HIV infection among women with experiences of sexual violence.

Reed’s research focuses on how economic empowerment efforts can reduce women and girls’ vulnerabilities to violence. She is currently involved in a multi-agency study designed to reduce HIV-transmission and violence among vulnerable women in Tijuana through a microfinance loan and gender equity intervention program.

The CDC Foundation and Futures Without Violence created the new investigator biennial award in 2007 to honor senior scientist Linda E. Saltzman, Ph.D., who became one of the CDC’s top experts on violence, and one of the violence prevention movement’s most trusted allies, dedicating 20 years to the field of violence against women, before her death in 2005. Recipients are nominated by senior investigators in the field and selected by the Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award Selection Committee, comprised of representatives from the CDC, Futures Without Violence, and other experts in the field.

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UCLA, Apple team on app to track breast cancer survivors’ experiences


Share the Journey: Mind, Body and Wellness after Breast Cancer available now on iTunes.

Patricia Ganz, UCLA

By Reggie Kumar, UCLA

UCLA cancer research pioneer Dr. Patricia Ganz and collaborators Apple and Sage Bionetworks today (March 9) announced the launch of Share the Journey: Mind, Body and Wellness after Breast Cancer, a patient-centered mobile app that empowers women to be partners in the research process by tracking their symptoms and successes.

Available for download today at the iTunes App Store, Share the Journey was developed by UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Penn Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Sage Bionetworks. The app is an interactive research study that aims to understand why some breast cancer survivors recover faster than others, why their symptoms vary over time and what can be done to improve symptoms.

Ganz, who is director of cancer prevention and control research at the Jonsson Cancer Center, was a key collaborator with Apple and Sage in developing Share the Journey, which marries science and technology by using surveys and sensor data on the iPhone to collect and track fatigue, mood and cognitive changes, sleep disturbances and reductions in exercise.

Share the Journey is one of five new apps being launched in conjunction with Apple’s ResearchKit, an open-source tool that serves as a streamlined hub for iOS apps that can help speed scientific progress toward cures by amplifying the patient voice in shaping research directions and outcomes.

Share the Journey shifts the center of care, healing and intervention into the hands of women who have survived breast cancer. Its creators say that collecting women’s experiences after breast cancer treatment will create a trove of data based on well-validated surveys and measurements that will be continuously improved upon based on the participants’ feedback.

Women who have undergone surgery, radiation or drug therapy to treat breast cancer often experience symptoms that affect their quality of life and impede recovery.

“We’re excited to use these new ResearchKit tools to expand participant recruitment and quickly gather even more data through the simple use of an app. The data it will provide takes us one step closer to developing more personalized care,” said Ganz, who also is a professor at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. “Access to more diverse patient-reported health data will help us learn more about long-term aftereffects of cancer treatments and provide us with a better understanding of breast cancer patients’ experience.”

Share the Journey is open to women between the ages of 18 and 80 who live in the United States, whether or not they have had breast cancer. Those who have not had breast cancer will contribute important data to the app that will help researchers understand which symptoms may be related to cancer treatment and which may be part of the normal aging process. The developers also are creating a Spanish-language version of the app and planning to expand the study to other countries.

“One reason to build these apps and run these studies is to see whether we can turn anecdotes into signals, and by generating signals find windows for intervention,” said Dr. Stephen Friend, president of Sage Bionetworks and a principal investigator for Share the Journey. “We’re most interested in disease variations and the hourly, daily or weekly ebb and flow of symptoms that are not being tracked and completely missed by biannual visits to the doctor.”

The platform is based on the concept that if individuals’ experiences were at the center of the research process, researchers working in virtual teams might be able to get efficient, inexpensive and ubiquitous ways of gathering information using websites, tablets or an app. This technology will allow Sage and other teams to include patients and other study participants as owners of their own data and equal partners.

“We need to better understand some of the long-term negative treatment effects, such as fatigue, that can be associated with the disease control benefits of cancer therapies. What are the biological mechanisms that underpin those effects and why some survivors are more vulnerable to those effects than others,” Ganz said.

“With Share the Journey, women can tell us when something’s wrong, and the app has the potential to capture valuable information on the patient experience. Our current cancer care system lacks the ability to predict or treat these chronic and enduring symptoms, but Share the Journey can set us on a path toward understanding why some people recover and some do not.”

In addition to Ganz, Apple and Sage were advised in development of Share the Journey by Drs. Ann Partridge and Judy Garber at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dr. Kathryn Schmitz at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and Dr. Susan Love at UCLA and the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

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Curing cancer, one tax return at a time


Check a box and fund two UC-administered cancer research projects.

California taxpayers fund a number of health programs — some administered by UC — by designating a portion of their tax refund.

By Kate Rix, UC Newsroom

Those contribution lines on your 540 State Income Tax Return where you can fill in donation amounts for nearly 30 different California-based funds? Those are just nickel-and-dime funds without much impact, right?

Wrong.

Last year California taxpayers contributed more than $4 million to an inspiring range of worthy health, environmental and educational funds. Among the funds that get an important boost around tax time are the California Breast Cancer Research Program and the California Cancer Research Fund. Both funds are administered by the University of California, which distributes the money as direct grants to California researchers working on the cutting edge.

In other words, those contributions have a tangible impact in the fight against cancer, supporting work that ranges from personalized support for young cancer survivors to new low-radiation screening tools.

Protecting fertility for young cancer survivors

As treatments for breast cancer improve, the number of young women surviving the disease has grown. Of the 2.8 million cancer survivors in the U.S., 10 percent are under 45 at diagnosis. After enduring cancer therapies and one of the most frightening experiences of their lives, survivors often find themselves faced with a variety of worrisome long-term health issues.

During chemotherapy, menstrual periods often stop, and it is not uncommon for women — even very young women — to experience the symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Cancer fears become compounded by worries that they may never be able to have children and that their bodies will never be the same.

“Young breast cancer survivors and their health care providers want to learn about how to manage reproductive health after cancer,” said Dr. Irene Su, an assistant professor in the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Closing the knowledge gap

“There hasn’t been an emphasis on providing reproductive health information to young survivors,” Su said. Also, because many health care providers may not see that many young women with cancer, they may face knowledge gaps on providing reproductive health care for this population.

“Right now, there is a dearth of resources for disseminating reproductive health care information to patients and providers.”

Su is leading a project, funded by the California Breast Cancer Research Program, to help women and their medical providers — no matter where they are located — have access to up-to-date, evidence-based information to treat estrogen deprivation symptoms, improve sexual function and monitor fertility potential after cancer. CBCRP received nearly $400,000 through the tax check-off program last year.

With a grant of more than $750,000 over three years, the project will generate the Reproductive Survivorship Care Plan (SCP-R), a Web-based tool that offers the best current research on managing hot flashes, sexual problems, fertility concerns and contraception to young breast cancer patients and their providers. Information can be tailored to the patient, and focuses on specific issues. The SCP-R will be tested in a randomized controlled trial that launches this summer.

The resource is being developed with the participation of patients and caregivers recruited across the country and with the oversight of a stakeholder panel of clinicians, researchers and breast cancer survivors.

Young women who survive breast cancer often have questions about fertility. It isn’t unusual, for example, for a young woman’s periods to stop when she undergoes chemotherapy. Women who have not completed their families may worry that not menstruating means that they are infertile. “The SCP-R will provide relevant information on the natural course of ovarian recovery, when survivors usually get their periods back, types of blood tests that can help monitor ovarian function, and, equally importantly, what tests are not recommended and what we still don’t know,” Su said.

Women who have completed their families will need to consider effective contraception. In the United States, birth control pills are the most common reversible form of contraception. For a cancer survivor, however, it is crucial to keep estrogen levels low.

“The copper IUD is a great form of reversible birth control, because it is non-hormonal and highly effective,” said Su. “It would be great if a family practice physician or oncology provider had knowledge of how effective different birth controls are and what are recommended methods for breast cancer survivors.”

Lung cancer screenings as safe as chest X-rays

Lung cancer is the most deadly form of cancer in the U.S. While patients with other forms of cancer are living longer than before, the five-year survival rate for lung cancers hasn’t improved much in recent decades. More people die from lung cancer than from the next four cancers combined (including breast and prostate cancer). And while smoking is a leading cause of lung cancer, up to 15 percent of lung cancers have no relation to smoking; even smokers who quit smoking up to 15 years previously are still at risk of lung cancer.

One obstacle has been the lack of any screening test to detect lung cancer at an early stage. While imaging technology held some promise, it was unproven and there were some risks associated with being screened. But just a few years ago, a national lung screening trial found that at-risk patients who were screened using low-dose CT scanning technology had a 15-20 percent lower chance of dying of lung cancer than those who received a standard chest X-ray.

These results showed promise for a new tool, with dramatically reduced radiation, to detect the most deadly form of cancer.

With funding from the California Cancer Research Fund (administered by UC’s Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program), a team at UCLA is working to bring the level of radiation in an ultra-low-dose CT scan even lower. The TRDRP received nearly $445,000 through the tax check-off program last year.

“We know how to do the screening and the technology is pretty good,” said Michael McNitt-Gray, a professor of radiology at the UCLA School of Medicine. “We want to push that dose even lower. We’d like to get the same level as a single chest X-ray.”

Shorter times, improved images

Several aspects of CT scanning technology have improved dramatically. While low-dose CT screenings have been possible for nearly 20 years, technical limits have made them difficult to use effectively.

For example, an accurate image used to take up to 60 seconds to capture. Patients had to hold their breath during that entire time, something that most smokers can’t do.

The improvements being made at UCLA make the process faster — the actual scan takes just 5 seconds — and can allow finer detail in the image, showing suspicious objects in the lung as small as 5 mm.

The timing of the UCLA project couldn’t be better. Last year, private insurers began covering the cost of ultra-low-dose CT scans. In February, Medicare announced that it also would cover the screening, making the early detection tool available to the elderly and disabled who may be at risk of developing lung cancer.

“The test itself is very quick,” says McNitt-Gray. “The patient lies down, puts their arms above their head, and does some practice breathing. Based upon a planning view, the scanner adjusts to the patient’s anatomy so that just enough of the radiation dose is used to provide the necessary image quality to detect anything suspicious in the lungs.”

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Are we closing the gender gap?


UCLA report reveals marked inequalities in legal rights for women and girls around world.

The report found that although all but seven countries have made primary education tuition-free, 40 charge tuition before the end of secondary school. (Photo courtesy of UCLA's World Policy Analysis Center)

By Carla Denly, UCLA

On March 9, the United Nations will convene to evaluate the global community’s progress on gender equality in the 20 years since 189 countries adopted the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. The U.N. session will continue through March 20.

Closing the Gender Gap,” a new report by UCLA’s World Policy Analysis Center (World), reveals that more than 170 countries have legal barriers preventing women and girls from experiencing the same rights, protections and liberties as men and boys.

World’s new report and accompanying online resource bank take a heightened approach to global accountability and transparency by detailing the rights, laws and policies pertaining to gender equality in 197 countries and Beijing Platform signatories. The resource bank includes quantitatively analyzable data, policy briefs, mobile-friendly interactive maps, infographics, fact sheets and more.

Analysis by World shows that in most countries, gender inequality continues to be embedded in national constitutions, laws and policies:

  • More than 150 countries lack protections critical to ensuring women’s economic participation.
  • Sixty-one countries provide girls with less legal protection from early marriage than they do for boys.
  • Ninety-two countries guarantee paid leave to mothers of infants, but not to fathers, perpetuating inequalities in the burden of caregiving and limiting equal opportunities at work.

The U.S. is not immune from these concerns — here, for example, mothers are not ensured paid leave to care for their newborn children, making the U.S. the world’s only high-income country not to provide such a guarantee. And while more than 80 percent of countries in the world have a constitutional guarantee of gender equality, the U.S. does not.

Yet the report findings indicate that progress is possible. More than 95 percent of the 56 new national constitutions adopted around the world in the past 20 years legally guarantee gender equality. Good legislation and policies exist in all regions and at all country income levels.

“Citizens need and deserve to know their rights and how their country fares when compared to others,” said Dr. Jody Heymann, founding director of the World Policy Analysis Center and dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. “Only by getting data into the hands of citizens and leaders alike on what effective steps have been taken — and what haven’t — can we close the gender gap in our global community.”

The study examined whether laws treat women and men equally, and whether concrete steps have been taken to reduce inequality. Among the findings:

Constitutions

  • Constitutional guarantees are nearly universal in newly passed constitutions. More than 95 percent of the 56 constitutions that have been adopted since 1995 include guarantees for gender equality, compared with just 79 percent enacted before then. These protections of equality provide a foundation to challenge discriminatory laws.
  • Thirty-two constitutions still do not explicitly guarantee gender equality.
  • Eleven constitutions allow customary or religious law to supersede constitutional protections of gender equality, potentially jeopardizing equal rights for women.
  • Despite constitutional guarantees, discriminatory laws remain in place in many countries around the world.

Families and marriage

  • Only 56 constitutions guarantee equality within marriage and there has been little change in the level of protection over the past 20 years.
  • Legislation also lags behind in this area. Sixty-one countries allow girls to be legally married younger than boys.
  • Inequalities in the law contribute to more girls being married young than boys: Nearly five times more girls than boys are married before the age of 18.
  • While large gaps remain, many countries have strengthened child marriage legislation since Beijing. Among 105 low- and middle-income countries, the percentage of countries that allow girls to be married before age 18 with parental consent fell from to 56 percent in 2013 from 80 percent in 1995.

Families and work

  • One hundred and eighty-eight countries guarantee paid leave for new mothers (the U.S. does not), but only 96 countries provide paid leave for new fathers. This legal inequality reinforces social norms that women are responsible for care and limits women’s economic opportunities, contributing to lower employment rates and wages for women.
  • Caregiving doesn’t end at infancy. Eighty-one countries provide no leave that can be used to meet children’s health needs and five other countries place the burden of meeting children’s health needs solely on women. In 143 countries, no leave can be used to meet children’s educational needs and two other countries place the burden of meeting children’s educational needs solely on women.
  • As the global population ages, leave to care for adult family members is increasingly important. Ninety-seven countries do not provide any leave to meet adult family members’ health needs. This gap disproportionately affects women who carry far more of the elder caregiving globally.
  • Countries that do guarantee paid leave for men and women exist in every region and income level.

Education

  • All but seven countries have made primary education tuition-free, but 40 countries continue to charge tuition before the end of secondary school.
  • When cost is a barrier, girls are more likely to be kept out of schools than boys. Unsurprisingly, the regions with the largest gaps in secondary enrolment for boys and girls are also those that are most likely to charge tuition.
  • Among those countries with available expenditure data, 43 percent that charge tuition before the completion of secondary school spend less than 4 percent of their gross domestic product on education.

Economy and work

  • Only 64 countries constitutionally guarantee women protection from discrimination at work or guarantee equal pay for equal work.
  • Only 40 countries have legislative protections from gender discrimination in hiring and pay.
  • Of constitutions adopted in the past 20 years, 38 percent guarantee protection from discrimination at work, compared to only 12 percent of those that existed previously.

World’s findings provide an opportunity to examine countries’ progress in closing the gender gap, especially in critical areas that impact the daily lives of women and girls — access to quality education and the ability to remain in school, protection from child marriage, equal rights in employment, and policies that ensure health at work and at home.

“When the status of women and girls improves, population health improves and the economic strength of companies and countries increases. Entire families, communities, and countries are lifted up,” Heymann said.

The Maternal and Child Health Equity research program at McGill University helped develop longitudinal data on child marriage, breastfeeding breaks and maternal leave for the study.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provided grant support for this work to improve the quantity and quality of comparative policy data available in partnership with the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation’s No Ceilings Initiative.

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UC complex contraception registry established to enhance family planning


UC collaborative taps into cross-campus searchable database to help improve patient care.

“You can have a big impact in a woman's life if you are able to identify that she has a need for more contraceptive counseling.” – Sheila Mody, UC San Diego

By Patti Wieser, UC San Diego

With support from the UC Office of the President, the family planning fellowship-trained specialists at the five UC medical center campuses – led by Sheila Mody, M.D., at UC San Diego – have established a UC-wide complex contraception registry.

“We are looking at how women with medical conditions access family planning specialists for contraception and how they make contraceptive decisions,” said Mody, the first family planning specialist at UC San Diego.

Last summer the Complex Contraception Registry–UC Family Planning Collaborative Study began recruiting patients with medical conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, migraines, cancer and organ transplants. Currently, 75 participants are enrolled in the registry, which is on ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the National Institutes of Health. The registry contains demographics, diagnoses and contraceptive method.

Many women with complex medical conditions who do not wish to become pregnant are not receiving in-depth contraception counseling from their primary or subspecialty care clinicians, and often they are not using contraception, Mody said. Several, she added, have conditions that could worsen with pregnancy or for whom pregnancy could be complicated by the medical condition.

“You can have a big impact in a woman’s life if you are able to identify that she has a need for more contraceptive counseling. If the recommendation is for a patient to prevent pregnancy at this point in her life, we want to help her achieve that,” said Mody.

She is supported through an institutional NIH K12 award and mentored by UC San Diego Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI) Executive Committee member Christina Chambers, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Groundbreaking work

“The work Dr. Mody is doing is groundbreaking in terms of preventing ‘preventable’ birth defects,” said Chambers, a professor of pediatrics at UC San Diego. “When we are prescribing medications known to have the potential to cause birth defects, it is essential to couple this with effective contraception counseling.”

A family planning fellowship-trained specialist can also recommend contraceptive methods that won’t interfere with therapy. For example, if a patient is taking medication for epilepsy and is concerned about drug-drug interactions, the specialist might recommend an intrauterine device rather than an oral contraceptive.

Mody said bringing the five medical campuses together with inter-institutional support and resources has a greater impact on patient health. The collaborative partners include UC Davis, UC Irvine, UCLA, UC San Diego and UC San Francisco.

“In order to progress the research knowledge about family planning with these medical conditions, it is helpful to have the UCs work together so we can improve patient care,” Mody said.

The UC partnership is also important for tackling state-specific research questions and policy issues.

UC ReX employed for research data

The collaborative employed UC Research Exchange (UC ReX), an initiative of UC Biomedical Research, Acceleration, Integration, and Development (UC BRAID), a consortium of the five UC medical center campuses. The UC ReX Data Explorer is a secure online system that enables cross-institution queries of clinical aggregate data from 13.6 million de-identified records. The collaborative then used the UC systemwide IRB Reliance Registry to streamline its administrative processes. Reliance is a regulatory initiative that enables UC campuses to rely on the Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval received by another UC campus.

“We began by using UC ReX. We wanted to get numbers of potential participants with different diagnoses. UC ReX enables us to search by age, gender, medical condition or diagnosis, and we were able to get rough estimates,” Mody said.

Through CTRI, the researchers also used Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) for data entry. REDCap is a secure Web application for building and managing online surveys and databases.

“All of these tools have definitely helped us launch this project,” said Mody.

UCOP and each medical center campus provided funding for the study.

“We received a generous grant to do our first research together and develop the collaborative as a whole,” Mody said.

The effort included combining its family planning journal clubs and salary support for research assistants at five study sites.

“Seeing the concept come to life has been very fulfilling. Everyone’s hard work, dedication and vision for the study’s potential have really contributed to its success,” she said. “The key is not to work in silos.”

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$13M gift launches new maternal and child health center


UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health to launch Wallace Maternal and Child Health Center.

By Jose Rodriguez, UC Berkeley

Dr. Helen Wallace, a world-renowned professor, mentor and advocate known for her passion for improving the lives of women and children, has left a bequest valued at more than $13 million to UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health. The funds will launch the Wallace Maternal and Child Health Center, the campus announced today (March 2).

The new center will engage in innovative, evidence-based research aimed at creating healthier generations of women, mothers, children and families in the United States. It will focus on educating and training public health leaders primarily, but not exclusively, from states west of the Mississippi River through interdisciplinary scholarships and fellowships. The funds also will create a new endowed chair.

By fostering partnerships at every level of research, from discovery science to implementation and dissemination of evidence, the Wallace Center will complement the school’s existing maternal and child health (MCH) program — one of the pre-eminent MCH leadership training programs in the nation — and the Bixby Center for Population, Health and Sustainability.

Wallace, who died in 2013 at the age of 99, mentored generations of students as a professor and chair of the school’s MCH program from 1962 to 1980. She laid important groundwork in the field by fostering collaboration across disciplines at a time when it was rare to do so, and she implemented these practices within the school, in research partnerships and in her writing. She was particularly interested in infant health, maternal mortality, health systems that improved health outcomes, and expanded delivery of health care to mothers and children.

“We are extremely excited and gratified to move our work forward with greater focus and commitment in the arena of maternal and child health, which was the vision of Dr. Helen Wallace,” said Dr. Stefano Bertozzi, dean of the School of Public Health. “The School of Public Health has been taking a leadership role on these issues at the global level for some time now through the Bixby Center for Population, Health, and Sustainability. The new Wallace Maternal and Child Health Center will deepen our work and allow us to focus on attracting and supporting students from the western United States.”

The Wallace Center will embody the values of the School of Public Health: equity, excellence, diversity, innovation, impact and collaboration. By supporting and engaging faculty and students and attracting new talent, the center will play an important role in workforce development while sustaining UC Berkeley’s reputation as a game-changer at the forefront of public health.

Wallace is remembered for visionary efforts that brought together scholars from separate disciplines, such as public health and social welfare, to advance common research goals, and for attracting the school’s first maternal and child health training grant from the federal government.

“She was well-known for mentoring her students and ensuring that what they learned on campus was put to use to benefit society,” said Sylvia Guendelman, professor and chair of the maternal and child health program at UC Berkeley. “She inspired her students to be leaders, to make a positive difference in the world.”

Among the leaders Wallace trained was Dr. Peter van Dyck, who served as associate administrator of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau from 1999 to 2011.

“Helen Wallace assured me and others at Berkeley that in maternal and child health, we could touch individual children as well as influence public health by implementing good policy,” said van Dyck. “She was correct. She was a great mentor.”

Guendelman, who will lead the planning effort, said that the center will allow new generations of students to see Wallace’s “vision, spirit and effort endure over time.”

Wallace received her bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College in 1933, her master’s in public health cum laude from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1943 and her medical degree from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1937.

She was the author of 336 journal articles and 16 textbooks — most recently, ”Health and Welfare for Families in the 21st Century,” the second edition of which was published in 2003. Besides serving as the national health chair of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers, Wallace was secretary of the maternal and child health section and a member of the committee on child health of the American Public Health Association.

She was, in addition, assistant editor of the Journal of the American Women’s Medical Association, as well as a diplomate of both the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Board of Preventive Medicine. She consulted with the World Health Organization in many countries including Uganda, the Philippines, India, Turkey, Iran, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka and Nepal, and trained numerous physicians in Africa and Asia.

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Obesity poses serious health risks for moms and their babies


‘Eating for two’ no longer holds weight.

By Shari Roan, U Magazine

Veronica Romero was 21 years old and worried. Pregnant with her first child, she was putting on a lot of weight. Her obstetrician leveled with her: “You’re gaining too much.” But as she approached 50 pounds of weight gain near the end of her pregnancy, Romero felt helpless.

“I tried to watch what I was eating, but it was so hard. Pregnant women get cravings, and my cravings were sugary,” she recalled.

“I tried to eat carrots and small appetizers, but it didn’t work. I was disappointed. I didn’t want to get bigger.” The pregnancy set into motion a health crisis on two fronts: for Romero, now 38, and her son, Anthony, now 17. Romero eventually grew to nearly 300 pounds, and Anthony became a big baby, then a chubby toddler and now an obese adolescent.

This mother-child pair is not unique. The obesity tsunami that has washed across the United States over the past four decades has swept up pregnant women and their offspring too. In fact, pregnant women today are considered by some medical authorities to be at the nexus of the obesity crisis. Abundant research has revealed that pregnancy is a key period of increased risk for developing obesity in women and that obesity in pregnancy may genetically “program” offspring to become overweight or obese later in life.

The concept, commonly known as fetal programming, is rapidly altering the fields of obstetrics and pediatrics, said Dr. Sherin Devaskar, Mattel Executive Endowed Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, physician-in-chief of Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA and assistant vice chancellor of children’s health. “There have been many studies to prove beyond a doubt that fetal programming is real. If a mother is obese, her babies are at very high risk for obesity and chronic disease.”

In the United States, more than half of all pregnant women are overweight or obese, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. An estimated 9 percent of babies are born macrosomic — weighing too much for their gestational age. Fetal macrosomia is typically defined as a birth weight of more than 9 pounds, 15 ounces, regardless of gestational age.

However, obesity in pregnancy can also result in babies who are born prematurely or underweight. These infants also seem to be predisposed to obesity and related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, later in life, Devaskar explained.

More than three decades ago, Dr. David Barker, a British physician and epidemiologist, linked birth weight, either excessively high or low, to a heightened risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity in offspring. He posited that these diseases had their roots, at least in part, in under- or over-nutrition during pregnancy. If a pregnant woman is under-nourished, her infant is prone to low birth weight with a rapid “catch-up” gain in body fat later when exposed to plentiful food. If a pregnant woman is over-nourished, her infant is prone to high birth weight and a booming growth trajectory that increases the risk of obesity later in life.

The amount of nutrients provided to a developing fetus, as well as the type of nutrients, appears to chemically modify genes that predispose a child to obesity and obesity-related diseases, said  Devaskar, whose own research on the subject resulted in her election to the prestigious Institute of Medicine in 2012. Her current research focuses on whether or not it’s possible to further modify those genes to reverse the propensity to gain weight. “In the fetus, the organs are still developing,” she explained. “It’s a critical window of development, and it’s very plastic at that time. Any insult — whether it’s from diet, drugs or toxins — creates a permanent mark that lasts for one’s lifetime. The hypothalamus — the part of the brain governing metabolism and hunger — is already programmed. The infant is used to seeing so much nutrition coming from the mother. These children are ever-hungry; they are born hypersensitive to high-calorie foods. Their insulin sensitivity is low, so they are at high risk for developing diabetes, obesity and heart disease.”

In 2009, the Institute of Medicine issued revolutionary new guidelines to begin to address obesity in pregnancy. The group put tighter limits on weight gain in pregnancy, warning doctors to help their patients stay within a healthy range and even strictly limit weight gain in obese pregnant women to 11 to 20 pounds.

“It’s a major change,” said Dr. Aisling Murphy, assistant professor in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. “More recent data have suggested that obese women really don’t need to be gaining as much weight as women who enter pregnancy at a normal weight.”

Moreover, doctors are encouraging pregnant women to exercise — something many women had been fearful of doing. “Sometimes, women are under the impression that they shouldn’t be walking or going to the gym when they are pregnant. That is not the case,” Murphy said. “They really should be active.”

In addition to the risk of fetal programming, obesity during pregnancy is linked to several other potential complications. The chances of developing both hypertension and gestational diabetes are higher in pregnant women who are obese. About 7 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. Studies show that these women have an increased likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. In essence, gestational diabetes often isn’t a “temporary” condition that goes away after childbirth.

Obesity during pregnancy also raises the risk of some types of birth defects and other complications, such as an increased risk of Cesarean section or complications during childbirth, Murphy noted.

While two decades ago, few pregnant women were given extra resources and support they needed to manage weight gain, overweight or obese women who are planning to have children are now encouraged to seek pre-conception counseling, where they are given advice and resources to help them lose weight before becoming pregnant. And pregnant women who are obese are typically referred to a registered dietician for assistance with a healthy diet. Breastfeeding for at least six months is highly recommended to help the mother lose weight.

“If we can take care of young women before pregnancy and during pregnancy, we will end up with a healthier society, and it will bring down health care costs dramatically,” Dr. Devaskar said.

Read the complete story in the latest issue of U Magazine.

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UCSF receives $100M gift to advance health sciences mission


Landmark gift cements Chuck Feeney’s role as UC system’s top philanthropist.

Chuck Feeney

By Jennifer O’Brien, UC San Francisco

UC San Francisco has received a $100 million gift from visionary philanthropist Charles F. “Chuck” Feeney to support its new Mission Bay hospitals, world-class faculty and students, and research programs focused on the neurosciences and aging.

This donation brings the longtime supporter’s total UCSF giving to more than $394 million, making Feeney the single largest contributor to the University of California system.

“I get my gratification from knowing that my investments in medical research, education, and the delivery of health care at UCSF will provide lifelong benefits to millions of people not only in the Bay Area but also around the world,” said Feeney, who, despite his global presence as a successful entrepreneur and discerning philanthropist, prefers remaining out of the limelight. “I can’t imagine a more effective way to distribute my undeserved wealth.”

Reflecting on Feeney’s contributions, UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., said, “As we celebrate UCSF’s 150th anniversary this year, it is only fitting that we acknowledge the unique role Chuck has played in our history. While his impact has been felt most profoundly during this past decade, his generosity will carry on forever at our university, in the San Francisco community, throughout the Bay Area and globally, as our faculty and students advance knowledge and provide the finest clinical care. We are honored that he has decided to invest again in UCSF.”

Feeney’s gifts to UCSF are most visible at the university’s Mission Bay campus, where he has provided indispensable support to create advanced facilities and foster the environment for the biomedical research and patient care that goes on within them.

Before the latest funding, Feeney’s most recent gift to the campus was to UCSF Global Health Sciences, enabling the October 2014 opening of Mission Hall, which houses global health researchers, scientists and students under the same roof for the first time. Feeney, who coined the term “giving while living,” also generously supported the building of the Smith Cardiovascular Research Building and the Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building.

“Chuck Feeney has been our partner at Mission Bay for more than 10 years,” added Hawgood. “He immediately embraced the Mission Bay concept, and he has enthusiastically helped us shape a larger vision for the campus and finance its development because he knew that our research and clinical programs could not flourish without state-of-the-art buildings.”

Gift to support four primary areas

The Campaign for the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay
Funds will support the $600 million philanthropy goal of the $1.5 billion hospitals project. The latest donation builds upon the transformative $125 million matching gift Feeney made to support the hospitals complex and its programs in 2009, the largest gift received toward the campaign.

The opening of the 289-bed hospital complex – which includes UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital, UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital, and the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building – was the culmination of more than 10 years of planning and construction. Strategically located adjacent to UCSF’s renowned Mission Bay biomedical research campus, the new medical center places UCSF physicians in close proximity to UCSF researchers and nearby bioscience companies who are working to understand and treat a range of diseases, from cancer to neurological disorders.

“It’s been thrilling to see the reactions of our patients and their families as they encounter the amazing care offered at our new UCSF Mission Bay hospitals,” said Mark Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “This world-class experience would never have been possible without the support of Chuck Feeney who, as the largest contributor to the project, helped us create the hospitals of our dreams. Every patient cured, every breakthrough discovered at Mission Bay, will be thanks in part to Chuck. His legacy is unparalleled.”

Neuroscience and aging
The gift also supports UCSF’s pre-eminent neuroscience enterprise, including its Sandler Neurosciences Center and neurology programs at Mission Bay.

The center, a five-story, 237,000-square-foot building that opened in 2012, brings under one roof several of the world’s leading clinical and basic research programs in a collaborative environment. UCSF’s neurology and aging efforts are focused on finding new diagnostics, treatments, and cures for a number of intractable disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, migraine, epilepsy and autism. The programs also seek to integrate neuroscience and clinical disciplines with public health initiatives in order to disseminate and implement novel findings from research centers of excellence, as well as conduct community outreach to raise awareness about the diseases of aging.

“Chuck Feeney has taken a keen interest in the challenges of aging,” said Hawgood. “In turn, he has recognized UCSF’s extraordinary talent in the neurosciences, among both basic researchers and those who translate research into clinical care and public policy. This gift will build on UCSF’s strengths while encouraging strong partnerships at other research institutions around the world where Chuck also has made important investments.”

Student scholarships and housing
Even with its extraordinary academic firepower, UCSF has extremely limited funds to support scholarships for professional students in its schools of dentistry, medicine, nursing and pharmacy. Part of the gift will provide scholarship support, bolstering UCSF’s ability to recruit the best and brightest students, regardless of their financial circumstances.

Recent decreases in state funding led to tuition increases and higher demand for scholarships. This, in turn, increased student debt. Combined with Bay Area housing prices that are among the highest in the nation – from 2011 to 2013, the median rent increased by 24 percent – the prospect of overwhelming debt can deter economically vulnerable students as well as those from middle-class backgrounds from attending UCSF. By minimizing debt upon graduation, the scholarships will help ensure that a UCSF education remains in reach for students from underserved populations, as well as for those students who choose to become health care leaders in underserved communities.

“Scholarships give our students the gift of freedom: to make career choices based on purpose and passion, rather than the price of education; to use time to study, explore science, and volunteer to help others, rather than working to make ends meet; and to succeed because someone who never met them saw enough potential to invest in their dreams,” said Catherine Lucey, M.D., vice dean for education at UCSF’s School of Medicine. “These scholarships catalyze our schools’ ability to find, recruit, educate and nurture the workforce our country needs: talented professionals whose life experiences enable them to provide compassionate care to today’s diverse communities and advance science to improve the health of future communities.”

Faculty recruitment
The donation also will help UCSF recruit the next generation of promising faculty in an increasingly competitive marketplace.

New funding will attract junior faculty – who frequently find it more challenging to secure research funding – and provide initial startup funds as they launch their research careers and clinical practices. With decreasing federal support for young investigators, this gift will underwrite a new generation of brilliant upcoming faculty.

“While Chuck’s unprecedented generosity has been focused primarily on Mission Bay, he understands the power of the entire UCSF enterprise, from our cutting-edge stem cell research at Parnassus to our innovative cancer programs at Mount Zion,” Hawgood said. “We’re thrilled that Chuck has inspired other philanthropists to join him in creating one of the most vibrant life science communities in the world, where progress will ripple far beyond Mission Bay and the campus for generations to come.”

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UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay opens


Large-scale transport completed with support of city of San Francisco agencies.

More than 130 patients were carefully transported from Parnassus and Mount Zion campuses to the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay on Feb. 1. (Photo by Noah Berger)

>>Related: UCSF Medical Center at Parnassus and Mount Zion to expand care

>>Related: President Bill Clinton tours new UCSF hospitals

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

With 40 ambulances, approximately 300 UCSF staff and faculty, as well as 100 emergency medical services personnel, UCSF Medical Center on Sunday, Feb. 1,  safely transported 131 patients to the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay from its Parnassus and Mount Zion campuses.

The move day started at 7 a.m. on the UCSF Parnassus campus; later in the day patients also were transported from the UCSF Mount Zion campus. The last patient to be moved arrived at UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay at 3:33 p.m. The new medical center also greeted the first baby born at the new hospitals, a healthy boy who entered the world at a little more than seven pounds.

The opening of the new hospitals was the culmination of more than 10 years of planning and construction of the complex, which includes UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital, UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital and the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building.

The move day, itself, reflected significant planning. “Patient safety was our top priority during the patient move, along with minimizing disruption to our neighbors. We achieved both goals, thanks to the superb work of our medical center faculty and staff as well as our partners in the City of San Francisco,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “We have been looking forward to this day for some time, and the opportunity to start providing care in our new location at UCSF Mission Bay.”

The majority of patients who made the trip on Sunday were children, as UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco moved from Parnassus to its new home at UCSF Mission Bay.

Strategically located on UCSF’s world renowned UCSF Mission Bay biomedical research campus, the new medical center puts UCSF physicians in close proximity to UCSF researchers and nearby biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Mission Bay and beyond who are working to understand and treat diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease to neurological conditions.

“Placing the hospitals on our Mission Bay campus underscores our commitment to driving discoveries toward patient care, ensuring that our world-class researchers are working in close proximity to our leading clinical researchers and physicians in the hospitals,“ said Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., chancellor of UC San Francisco.  “They also will provide invaluable training for our medical students, the next generation of clinicians who will take care of patients at health care facilities across California and nationally.

“Significantly, the move also frees up space on our Parnassus and Mount Zion campuses, which will allow us to enrich our medical programs for adult patients there. With the opening of the hospitals at Mission Bay, we now have integrated clinical care and research programs on all of our campuses, the critical factor that has contributed to UCSF’s local, regional and global impact.”

The UCSF Parnassus campus will be restructured to provide more specialized clinical services, such as transplants, and the UCSF Mount Zion campus will become a world-class hub for outpatient care.

“UCSF Medical Center’s new $1.5 billion, state-of-the-art campus in our city’s Mission Bay neighborhood will help improve the health of children, women and cancer patients,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. “This is not just a milestone for UCSF; this is a milestone for our city and our city’s health care industry, which is at the heart of our economy providing good jobs for our residents.

“Right before our eyes, we have seen the transformation of this underutilized railyard in Mission Bay into an epicenter where new discoveries and innovation in medicine are saving lives around the world. By working together with our great partner UCSF, and the many generous philanthropists that helped build these new hospitals, we will continue to ensure our residents get the highest quality of health care.”

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California breast density law slow to have an impact


UC Davis research demonstrates need for more physician education.

Jonathan Hargreaves, UC Davis

By Dorsey Griffith, UC Davis

Ten months after California legislators enacted a controversial law mandating that radiologists notify women if they have dense breast tissue, UC Davis researchers have found that half of primary care physicians are still unfamiliar with the law and many don’t feel comfortable answering breast density-related questions from patients. The findings, to be published in the March print edition of Journal of the American College of Radiology, suggest that if the law is going to have any significant impact on patient care, primary care providers need more education about breast density and secondary imaging options.

“Overall, the impact of the breast density legislation probably is not significant if  primary care physicians are not educated or aware of it,” said lead author Kathleen Khong, a UC Davis radiologist and staff physician. “We should put some emphasis on educating the primary care physicians so that when they get questions from patients, they can be comfortable in addressing the issues.”

The California law, which took effect in April 2013, requires that patients whose breast density is defined as “heterogeneously dense” or “extremely dense” (about 50 percent of women), receive the following notification:

“Your mammogram shows that your breast tissue is dense. Dense breast tissue is common and is not abnormal. However, dense breast tissue can make it harder to evaluate the results of your mammogram and may also be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. This information about the results of your mammogram is given to you to raise your awareness and to inform your conversations with your doctor. Together, you can decide which screening options are right for you. A report of your results was sent to your physician.”

The researchers point out that breast density has long been a required part of any radiological report following mammography, but unless a patient asks to see the report, the information is shared only with the patient’s providers. Led by patient advocates, the legislation is intended to increase awareness of dense breasts and encourage patients to discuss the clinical issues with their doctors. According to published research, 28 states have passed, rejected or considered dense-breast notification legislation since 2009.

But the UC Davis study demonstrated that while women and their doctors are receiving the notifications, many of those physicians are unclear about what to do with the information. As a consequence, the researchers said, it appears that relatively few patients with dense breasts are asking questions about their breast density and its implications.

The UC Davis study surveyed 77 physicians about the new law.  Roughly half (49 percent) reported no knowledge of the legislation and only 32 percent of respondents noted an increase in patient levels of concern about breast density compared to prior years. In addition, a majority of primary care physicians were only “somewhat comfortable” (55 percent) or “not comfortable” (12 percent) with breast-density questions from their patients.

Khong said their survey results were surprising, but acknowledged that many primary care physicians may not feel they have sufficient training to make a clinical recommendation for a particular type of secondary screening. In fact, the study also found that 75 percent of respondents would like more education about the breast-density law and its implications for primary care.

“They are eager to learn and want to help their patients and be part of something positive as a result of this,” Khong said.

Jonathan Hargreaves, assistant professor of clinical radiology and a study co-author, said, for example,  that if a patient has dense breasts she should have a risk assessment, which takes into account her family history of breast cancer, biopsy history and other factors to determine whether a supplemental screening is warranted. Once  complete, the physician should then discuss the potential benefits and risks of supplemental imaging in determining the most appropriate approach for the patient. The use of ancillary screening in addition to mammography is a complex subject and still the subject of considerable debate, explained Hargreaves.

Tomosynthesis, known as 3-D mammography, is one supplemental test that breast radiologists generally agree provides a slight benefit for women with dense breasts over a standard mammogram and can be scheduled for the next annual mammographic screening appointment after receiving a notification. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is another secondary imaging option, Hargreaves said, but is generally only used for screening in women who have a very strong family history of breast cancer or have a known high-risk gene, such as BRCA.

“The law has raised a lot of awareness about breast density,” Hargreaves said. “That being said, mammography screening is the primary thing patients need to do, and beyond that, the real benefits of other screening techniques are still the subject of ongoing medical debate.”

Khong and Hargreaves hope to validate their findings by expanding their research to include primary care physicians from other major university health care systems in California.

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UCSF, CMC sign letter of intent to increase pediatric, women’s health services


Collaboration to expand services in Valley would build on foundation of existing relationship.

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

UCSF Medical Center and Community Medical Centers (CMC) have signed a letter of intent (LOI) to expand women’s and children’s services to the Central Valley, which has an undersupply of specialists for a growing population. The collaboration also would broaden medical education services in the area.

CMC, a Fresno-based regional health system, owns and operates Community Regional Medical Center (CRMC) and other licensed general acute care hospitals and outpatient centers in Fresno and Clovis that serve Fresno County and the surrounding counties.

“The delivery of health care is changing. We’re going to rely on medical information technology and strong alliances with private and academic physicians to more efficiently manage the health of entire families. This project with UCSF will be a key part of that,” said Craig Wagoner, CEO at Community Regional Medical Center.

The shared vision of CMC and UCSF includes development of a clinically integrated health system to facilitate better sharing of information in order to manage patient health; improved access to high-quality pediatric services in Fresno and surrounding communities; higher acuity pediatric services at CRMC to reduce the need for patients’ families to travel outside of Fresno; and increased integration of the academic and training missions of UCSF and CRMC.

An immediate goal for 2015 is to increase the availability of specialists at CRMC by this summer.

UCSF School of Medicine, which consistently is ranked among the nation’s top medical schools, has for decades operated a graduate medical education program in collaboration with Community, the San Joaquin Valley’s largest hospital organization.

About 300 UCSF medical residents and fellows currently practice on the Community Regional Medical Center campus, which is the Valley’s Level 1 trauma center. Pediatrics is one of 22 specialties currently offered in the Fresno-based graduate medical education program.

The collaboration among UCSF Fresno, CRMC and Valley Children’s Healthcare has afforded UCSF residents the ability to receive high-quality residency training across the entire spectrum of pediatric needs within a diverse set of clinical settings. UCSF remains firmly committed to maintaining and strengthening this long-time, top-ranked pediatric residency program for the benefit of patients, the community and the entire San Joaquin Valley.

“This is the next logical step in our relationship with Community,” said Michael Peterson, M.D., interim associate dean for UCSF Fresno. “The medical school is committed to serving the Valley, and our leadership team in San Francisco is excited about the opportunity to partner with the Community Regional Medical Center and build a leading-edge women’s and children’s program.”

“We have a great relationship with Fresno and the Central Valley, and this partnership with Community Medical Centers will strengthen that relationship,” said Stephen Wilson, M.D., Ph.D., associate chief medical officer for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco. “This is an opportunity to better integrate our women’s and children’s services in the region and support UCSF’s mission to provide care to patients in areas that are underserved.”

UCSF has been providing services in Fresno for decades. Established in 1975 and now celebrating its 40th anniversary, the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program plays a substantial role in providing health care services to residents of California’s San Joaquin Valley and training medical professionals in the region. A clinical branch of UCSF, the Fresno medical education program has trained approximately one-third of Central San Joaquin Valley physicians.

Faculty and medical residents at UCSF Fresno engage in a broad spectrum of research addressing health issues pertinent to the Valley. Faculty and residents also care for the overwhelming majority of the region’s underserved populations at health care facilities like CRMC.

In addition, UCSF Fresno provides academic preparation programs for middle- and high school students interested in the health professions through the Junior Doctors Academy and the Doctors Academy. UCSF Fresno academically prepares students at Fresno State to become competitive applicants to health professional schools and ultimately aims to prepare them for careers in health and medicine. UCSF Fresno also is a key partner in the UC Merced San Joaquin Valley Program in Medical Education.

The collaboration is anticipated to be finalized in the fall of 2015.

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UCSF receives $40M gift for new Medical Center at Mission Bay


Outpatient medical building to be named in honor of the Ron Conway family.

CSF Medical Center's new outpatient building, located on 16th Street, will be named the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building in honor of the family $40 million gift. Some outpatient clinics will begin opening on Jan. 26. (Photo by Cindy Chew)

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

UC San Francisco has received a $40 million gift from angel investor and philanthropist Ron Conway, his wife Gayle, and sons Ronny, Topher and Danny, to help fund the outpatient medical building at the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, which opens on Feb. 1 on UCSF’s world-renowned biomedical research campus. The outpatient medical building, a 207,500-square-foot facility that anchors the hospital complex, will house outpatient services for women, children and cancer patients.

In honor of the Conways’ generosity, UCSF will name the outpatient building the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, a result of more than 10 years of planning and construction, comprises UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital and UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital. The new facilities include a 289-bed hospital complex, with children’s emergency and outpatient services that will integrate research and medical advancements with patient-focused, compassionate care.​

Ron Conway is the founder of SV Angel and has worked with hundreds of startups including Google, Facebook, Zappos, Square, Airbnb, Dropbox, Pinterest  and Twitter. He also is a board member of the Salesforce.com Foundation and actively supports the tech civic organization sf.citi, College Track, Sandy Hook Promise, Americans for Responsible Solutions, Teach for America, THORN and Donors Choose.

“Ron and Gayle have been true partners with UCSF for more than a decade, and we are extremely grateful for their ongoing support. This building is significant for the connection it provides between the high-quality medical care patients will receive at our three specialty hospitals as inpatients, and the groundbreaking continuing care they will receive as outpatients,” said Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., chancellor of UCSF.

Ron Conway is a member of the UCSF Medical Center Campaign Cabinet and served on the UCSF Foundation Board for several years. He has been a generous fundraiser for and philanthropist to UCSF and in particular, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco.

He also has been an active supporter of neurodegenerative disease research and treatment, through the UCSF Neuroscience Initiative, which brings together under one roof outstanding scientists and clinicians from multiple disciplines – and the core technologies that they need to be successful.

“Ron is known as an ‘angel’ investor, and that description certainly holds true for his passion to better the lives of patients at UCSF,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “As a public medical center, we depend on the generosity of people like Ron and Gayle to continue serving the patients of San Francisco as well as Northern California and beyond. The Conways have been generous not just through financial gifts but with their time, introducing UCSF to their colleagues throughout the technology sector and Silicon Valley in order to advance our mission of care, research and education.”

The UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building is expected to draw more than 1,500 outpatient visits daily, as well as serve as a teaching facility for students. It includes a cancer clinic and women’s health clinic, and pediatric clinic. Some outpatient clinics will begin opening on Jan. 26.

The new medical center, strategically located on UCSF’s 60.2-acre Mission Bay research campus, will enhance UCSF’s ecosystem of innovation by putting physicians in close proximity to researchers and near biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Mission Bay and beyond. The new cancer hospital, for example, will sit near the UCSF Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, where every day leading scientists are seeking causes and cures for cancer.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay also will feature the only operating hospital helipad in San Francisco to transport critically ill babies, children and pregnant women to the medical center from outlying hospitals.

“Gayle and I are proud to partner with UCSF to improve the health of the Bay Area. We have watched UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay grow from a concept to a magnificent hospital complex, and can think of no better investment than supporting patients who are accessing needed outpatient medical services,” Ron Conway said. “We encourage others to get involved with the new medical center philanthropically, as well as other programs at this leading institution.”

The total $1.5 billion cost of the Mission Bay Hospitals Project has been funded by UCSF Medical Center financing and private philanthropy. Of the $600 million fundraising goal, UCSF has raised $550 million.

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