TAG: "Women’s health"

Building the future of health care


More than 1,000 donors give $131M in support of UC San Diego Jacobs Medical Center.

By Judy Piercey and Jade Griffin, UC San Diego

Committed to fostering the future of health care in San Diego, more than 1,000 donors have contributed $131 million to UC San Diego’s Jacobs Medical Center. Included in the total are gifts that matched a donation of $25 million, meeting the Challenge goal of the initiative.

Today (Nov. 20), the campus announced that the Challenge donation, originally anonymous, was made by Joan and Irwin Jacobs. They provided a $75 million lead gift for the new facility in 2010; with the Challenge gift, that brings their contributions to the Jacobs Medical Center to a total of $100 million. Continued private support will help fund the completion of the new medical center, which is the largest hospital project currently underway in Southern California.

Under construction and projected to open in 2016, Jacobs Medical Center is a $839 million, 10-story facility on the university’s La Jolla campus, which will include three new clinical care units in one location: The A. Vassiliadis Family Hospital for Advanced Surgery, The Pauline and Stanley Foster Hospital for Cancer Care and the Hospital for Women and Infants.

“We are deeply grateful to Joan and Irwin Jacobs for their generosity, including the recent $25 million match challenge,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “We also thank Carol Vassiliadis and Pauline Foster, who made leadership gifts, as well as all of the other donors who participated in meeting this challenge. These visionaries support UC San Diego’s commitment and vision to create a healthier world through new science, new medicine and new cures.”

“Jacobs Medical Center is part of a multibillion dollar university investment in the future of health care for the region,” said Dr. David A. Brenner, vice chancellor for Health Sciences and dean of the UC San Diego School of Medicine. “I want to thank all of the donors who have helped make this extraordinary medical center a reality.”

Irwin and Joan Jacobs

“When we came here in 1966, the medical school was just starting,” said Irwin Jacobs, co-founder, former chairman and CEO of Qualcomm Inc. and UC San Diego founding faculty member, who served as a professor in electrical and computer engineering from 1966 to 1972. “There was no hospital, just a school. So it’s very exciting to make Jacobs Medical Center possible. More and more, we’re learning how to bring results from basic research in biology and engineering to medicine, and to the clinic. I think this medical center is going to show how effective that can be. The innovations will spread out from San Diego, and go all around the world.”

The 509,500-square-foot facility will house 245 patient beds and be connected on multiple floors with the existing John M. and Sally B. Thornton Hospital on UC San Diego’s La Jolla campus, in the heart of the area’s nexus of biomedical research centers. Jacobs Medical Center has been designed with the patient in mind. From spacious private rooms to soothing color schemes and artwork, to next-generation medical equipment, the vision and needs of patients, doctors and nurses, all aspects of the Jacobs Medical Center have been fully integrated. Each floor will combine all the necessary healing elements while achieving optimal safety and efficient delivery of care.

“Soon we will have the largest, most technologically advanced hospital in the region, dedicated to offering specialized care for every kind of patient, in every phase of life,” said Paul Viviano, CEO of UC San Diego Health System.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCSF Mission Bay hospital complex to open Feb. 1


Three new hospitals for women, children and cancer patients.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay will open Feb. 1, 2015. (Photo by Mark Citret)

After more than 10 years of planning and construction, UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay will open Feb. 1, 2015 on UC San Francisco’s world-renowned biomedical research campus. UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay comprises UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital and UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital. The new facilities include a 289-bed hospital complex, with children’s emergency and outpatient services that will integrate research and medical advancements with patient-focused, compassionate care.​

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay will welcome its first patients the morning of Feb. 1, when teams of health care professionals and ambulances begin moving some inpatients from the UCSF Parnassus campus and Mount Zion campus into the new facilities.

The new medical center, strategically located on UCSF’s 60.2-acre Mission Bay research campus, will enhance UCSF’s ecosystem of innovation by putting physicians in close proximity to researchers and near biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Mission Bay and beyond. The new cancer hospital, for example, will sit near the UCSF Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, where every day leading scientists are seeking causes and cures for cancer.

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay also will feature the only operating hospital helipad in San Francisco to transport critically ill babies, children and pregnant women to the medical center from outlying hospitals.

“UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay profoundly advances our ability to fulfill our mission as a public hospital, providing high-quality health care that meets the future needs of the entire Bay Area,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO, UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “By embedding clinical care within our research enterprise at Mission Bay, UCSF physicians and scientists in the forefront of cancer medicine, and women’s and children’s health will be able to more readily translate discoveries into next-generation therapies and cures.”

Each of the new hospitals’ designs reflects significant input from patients and families, as well as clinicians.

“UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay sets a national benchmark for patient- and family-centered health care by offering an unparalleled healing environment that supports and connects patients and their families during hospital stays,” said Cindy Lima, executive director, UCSF Mission Bay Hospitals Project. “These new hospitals expand our capacity to provide the most advanced treatments in buildings that reflect input from the people who will use them.”

The hospitals feature state-of-the art technology, including the world’s largest hospital fleet of autonomous robotic couriers which will deliver linens, meals and medications. Interactive media walls in each private room will enable patients to communicate with their families and clinicians, and an imaging suite specially designed to eliminate anxiety during an MRI offers children the chance to virtually experience a San Francisco trolley ride, or to play with a cast of animated critters as they boat around the San Francisco Bay.

Distinctive features of UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay include 4.3 acres of green space and 1.2 acres of rooftop gardens, soothing art- and light-filled interiors and a public plaza created in partnership with the City of San Francisco. In addition, UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay is on target to be one of the first LEED Gold-certified hospital in California.

The Integrated Center for Design and Construction brought together more than 200 architects, engineers and contractors working side by side in a command center on the construction site. Construction of the hospitals began in December 2010.

“The healing power of UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay extends beyond the hospitals’ walls, as clinicians and researchers work side by side to accelerate medical breakthroughs and transform the delivery of health care in this country,” said Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., chancellor of UC San Francisco. “It’s important to note that the hospital complex was built only through the generous philanthropic support of the Bay Area community, who share our vision of advancing health care across the world. We are greatly appreciative of their unwavering commitment to our mission over the past decade. ”

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, one of the nation’s leading children’s hospitals, provides treatment for virtually all pediatric conditions, as well as for critically ill newborns. The Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco was one of the first of its kind in the world. The hospital is the only California state-designated children’s medical center in San Francisco and is affiliated with UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland.

The new 183-bed facility at Mission Bay creates an environment where children and their families find quality care at the forefront of scientific discovery. Private rooms in the intensive care nursery support the youngest patients, while the fully accredited classroom and teachers enable school-age patients to continue their education while focusing on their health. The hospital offers accommodations for families of pediatric patients and nearby lodging for those requiring longer stays.

UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital

UCSF ranks consistently among the top cancer care centers in the nation, according to the “America’s Best Hospitals” survey from U.S. News & World Report. UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital sets the standard in personalized care, delivering advanced cancer therapies tailored to individual patient needs. The hospital increases UCSF’s inpatient and outpatient capacity to meet growing demand, in a state-of-the-art facility. The new hospital will absorb many of the cancer surgery beds currently located at UCSF Medical Center at Mount Zion, offering cancer surgeries in specialties ranging from urology and orthopedics, to head and neck and gynecologic oncology. Specialists also serve the individual needs of cancer patients from the children’s and women’s hospitals. In the future, Mission Bay could house as many as 250 or more surgery beds, with a full complement of outpatient cancer care services.

UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital

As the region’s first dedicated women’s hospital, UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital will embody the philosophy of the UCSF National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health. The new hospital will deliver care that addresses health needs across a woman’s lifetime, including cancer treatment, specialty surgery, a 36-bed birth center, nine deluxe labor and delivery rooms, and select outpatient services. Customizing care to each patient, the hospital will provide the best available diagnostic tests and treatments in a caring, women- and family-focused environment that incorporates the latest technology. Spacious rooms allow loved ones to spend the day or night comfortably.

Each labor and delivery room is designed to be respectful to patients and families during the life-altering event of childbirth. Combining sophisticated technical capabilities with carefully considered design choices, each room emits a sense of calm for the birthing experience. At the same time, it is a highly functional space for clinicians to provide quality care.

View original article

Related link:
View press kit for additional information and multimedia materials

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Developing a noninvasive test for endometriosis


UCSF researchers ID patterns of genetic activity that could help in early detection of disorder.

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure.

The study is online in the journal Endocrinology.

“This promising molecular diagnostic approach would not have been possible without advances in genomics and bioinformatics,” said senior author Linda Giudice, M.D., Ph.D., distinguished professor and chair of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at UCSF.

“Importantly, there are relatively few genes in each ‘classifier’ of disease or of no disease and endometriosis stage that have the potential for non-surgical diagnostic development,” Giudice continued. “The approach also could be used to detect disease recurrence without requiring surgery, and the newly identified gene profiles and pathways resulting from this approach have opened doors for innovative targeted therapy development for endometriosis-related pain and infertility.”

Endometriosis is an often painful condition that occurs when tissue normally lining the inside of the uterus grows outside the uterus.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Bridge builder


Ellen Olshansky excels at forging bonds between university, community health organizations.

“My goal is to build partnerships with community-based groups,” says Ellen Olshansky, professor and founding director of nursing science at UCI. “I want to ask ‘How can we work together?’ It’s the difference between doing research ‘with’ and doing research ‘on.’” (Photo by Steve Zylius, UC Irvine)

Since joining UC Irvine in 2007 to launch the nursing science program, Ellen Olshansky has flourished as a highly respected county leader for community-based research and women’s health policy. And much of it started at her kitchen table five years ago.

There, in her University Hills home, Olshansky brought together Susan Bryant and Karol Gottfredson of UCI and Allyson Sonenshine and Stephanie Kight of Planned Parenthood of Orange & San Bernardino Counties to share ideas about what they could do to champion women’s health issues. Brainstorming over white wine, cheese and crackers, they outlined what would become the Orange County Women’s Health Project.

With aggressive planning and outreach by these five women, the OCWHP kicked off in 2011. In May 2012, it hosted the inaugural Orange County Women’s Health Policy Summit, at which a UCI alumna presented “A Snapshot of Women’s Health in Orange County” – the first-ever such survey.

The project’s partners have since formed task forces for breast and cervical cancer, teen reproductive health, and health and domestic violence. The work is paying dividends: Earlier this year, Blue Shield awarded the OCWHP $2 million to establish a countywide, integrated and collaborative system that will strengthen healthcare response to domestic violence and streamline service.

“Ellen was instrumental in getting the project off the ground – introducing the vision and doing the outreach and creating momentum,” says Sonenshine, OCWHP director. “We’ve developed a wonderful model that’s focused on data analysis, policy and education, and we play an increasingly important role.”

Now Olshansky is applying her bridge-building talents at UCI’s Institute for Clinical & Translational Science.

Supported by a prestigious Clinical & Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health, the ICTS is dedicated to advancing efforts to turn scientific discoveries into new methods, treatments and cures to improve public health. One of its most important objectives is community engagement, and that’s where Olshansky comes in.

“My goal is to build partnerships with community-based groups,” she says. “I want to ask ‘How can we work together?’ It’s the difference between doing research ‘with’ and doing research ‘on.’”

ICTS Director Dr. Dan Cooper says Olshansky is the perfect person at the perfect time to lead the community engagement push.

“Ellen has a long history of collaborating with the community, and her work is based upon having real dialogue and understanding among groups that don’t always speak the same language,” Cooper says. “She has remarkable skills in translating and expressing to faculty the community needs that impact health directly. Being a facilitator between these two groups is invaluable to us.”

To boost outreach, the ICTS is a founding partner of the Orange County Alliance for Community Health Research, which consists of the leaders of local, community-based organizations; practicing physicians; healthcare agencies; governmental representatives; community groups; and UCI researchers.

The alliance’s purpose is to create an infrastructure in Orange County that increases the ability of community organizations and universities to engage in health research that’s designed by the community to meet the needs of the community. Olshansky serves on its advisory board.

“At the heart of the alliance is the belief that the community first expresses its health needs, and then university researchers work with these partners to find solutions,” she says. “That’s what community-based research is all about, and I’ll be working diligently to further establish those relationships in Orange County.”

Earlier this year, Olshansky stepped aside from directing UCI’s Program in Nursing Science, where over seven years she oversaw the initiation of the bachelor’s program and the approval and initiation of the master’s and doctoral programs. She also spearheaded the effort to include nurse practitioner concentrations in the master’s program.

And during a recent sabbatical, Olshansky put the finishing touches on her latest book, Women’s Health & Wellness Across the Lifespan. Set for release on Dec. 11, it offers a historical and comprehensive look at women’s health – politically, socially, legally and medically – through contributions from leading experts across the country.

“This book is important because it explains the reasons why it’s necessary to have a focus on the issue of women’s health,” Olshansky says. “There has been such political push-back on sexual and reproductive health services, and we need to be sure that we continue to provide and strengthen these services.

“But many people believe that’s all women’s health is about. In fact, it’s much more than that, and this book goes in depth into the many other important issues women face. It’s written mostly for primary care physicians and nurse practitioners, but I believe anyone interested in women’s health will benefit from reading it.”

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Betting big on women, girls


Melinda Gates explains Gates Foundation’s strategy to lift countries out of poverty.

Melinda Gates talks with NPR’s Morning Edition co-anchor Renee Montagne about the source of her passion for improving conditions for people in undeveloped countries.

By Peggy McInerny, UCLA

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is betting big on women and girls to help developing countries lift themselves out of poverty, foundation co-chair Melinda Gates told a UCLA audience that filled Korn Convocation Hall on Nov. 5.

Gates sat down to talk with NPR’s Morning Edition co-anchor Renee Montagne at the 2014-2015 Arnold C. Harberger Distinguished Lecture on Economic Development of the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations. Co-sponsored this year by UCLA’s Center for World Health and the Health and Human Rights Law Project of the School of Law, the annual event is intended to bring economic policy experts to discuss their views with UCLA students and faculty.

UCLA Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics Harberger, who founded and supports the lecture series, was in attendance. A pioneer in the field of development economics, he has trained scores of Latin American economists over his 30 years at UCLA, where he continues to teach.

Gates has worked assiduously to restore contraception to a major place on the global health agenda. Her efforts in this direction led to the 2012 London Summit on Family Planning, which brought together donors, national governments and the development community from around the world. The summit adopted the goal of providing contraception to 120 million women in the developing world by 2020.

Today, 15 developing nations have created national family planning action plans. “We funnel our money through those action plans,” said Gates, which includes support at both the policy and the project levels.

Yet, said the speaker, she quickly realized that contraception alone could not resolve culturally ingrained gender inequality. Soon she began to advocate a holistic approach to cultivate the “other half” of the population of developing countries and, in the process, reduce poverty levels and promote economic growth.

Gates’ focus on gender inequality has led the Gates Foundation to “bet big” on three core areas: health, decision making power and economic empowerment. Saying she saw incredible opportunities in these areas to change things for the better for women and girls, she emphasized that the contributions of many individuals to these causes could create palpable change in our lifetimes.

Gates went even further, saying that development as a whole needs to be looked at through a gender lens. She explained, for example, that agricultural projects often do not take into account that the primary farmers in many countries are women, who frequently seek to avoid cash crops because they lose power over cash resources.

Longstanding development data show that investments in women’s health and education lead to smaller families with healthier, better-educated children. Where women have economic opportunity and decision-making power over resources, more of those resources are also invested in their families, promoting overall economic development.

“We need men and boys in the conversation on all of these issues,” said Gates. Only by educating men first about how contraception and women’s access to economic resources benefit the health and well-being of their children and their wives, she emphasized can these things become culturally acceptable. Moreover, the way in which health education is delivered must be culturally appropriate and respond to gender-specific circumstances.

Focusing on solving today’s problems

The Gates Foundation, which has an endowment of $42 billion and has already disbursed over $30 billion in grants, is focused on solving contemporary problems of the present generation — and perhaps the next — said the speaker.

The development aid provided by the foundation is not intended to endure indefinitely, noted Gates. Neither is the foundation itself. She and her husband do not expect it to have a shelf life much beyond their own — perhaps 15–20 years at most. “We want to spend our energy and our lives doing this work for the problems of today’s society,” she remarked.

“We are trying to build capacity now, so we can funnel more and more resources through those mechanisms,” she explained. “[And] as we learn what mechanisms work in one area, we take them and try to apply them to other areas.”

At present, the foundation is deeply engaged in the health sector in developing countries, supporting vaccination programs, building governmental and human capacity in health care, and developing ways to measure the impact of interventions, particularly those designed to improve gender inequality.

“The way that Bill and I think about this is that the only role [of] a foundation is to be a catalytic wedge,” said Gates. That is, foundations are able to take the risks needed to prove what does and doesn’t work. “But,” she added, “it takes government money to scale those things up.”

After helping create a global Vaccine Alliance (known as Gavi) and raising replenishment funds for it among wealthy nations, the Gates Foundation is now asking developing countries to make contributions to vaccination programs in their countries. Over time, these contributions are expected to increase until the programs become fully funded by those nations.

As a result of these programs, Gates noted that the governments of Ethiopia and Nigeria had built out basic-level primary health care systems in the form of “health posts.” (Ethiopia has built 15,000 such centers.)

“With basic supplies to help people and with basic trained health workers, usually two women, you can get unbelievable changes in maternal and child mortality,” observed Gates. The big lesson of the Ebola crisis is that investing in this primary level of health care provides an institutional bulwark against contagious diseases, which she predicted would continue to arise in perhaps more virulent form, she noted.

Nigeria, for example, was able to contain Ebola because after the first cases were reported, one of its polio clinics (supported by the Gates Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) was transformed into an Ebola emergency response clinic. Not only was the clinic able to trace the origin and spread of the disease in the country, the government was able to distribute appropriate behavior change messages throughout the system of health posts. In contrast, Liberia’s health system rapidly collapsed in the face of the Ebola crisis, having been greatly weakened by two decades of civil war.

Participating as an interlocutor, not an observer

Gates reflected that it was a great privilege to be able to travel for the foundation and learn firsthand about the concerns of men and women in the developing world. She traced her passion to making a difference in the world to the values of her parents, who encouraged all four of their children to attend college despite the serious financial burden this goal would impose.

A practicing Catholic, Gates said she attended a Catholic high school, but sought to transfer to an academically superior school in order to get into a good college. It took a while, she said, to understand that her parents sent her to the Catholic school because they believed in its values. “I was out serving in the courthouse … in the hospital, in a school two miles down the road,” she remarked. “These very liberal nuns showed us that we could make a change in the world.”

Asked if she had gotten pushback from Catholics about her support for contraception in developing nations, Gates said she had received surprisingly little criticism from people of faith. On the other hand, she noted, push back from Rome had been expected.

Whenever she travels to a development conference, the speaker said she makes a point to stop somewhere in Africa and meet people on the ground to remind herself what the work is about. Similarly, she takes a day or two to decompress after long stays in developing countries to let the stories she has heard wash through her, experience the grief sparked by them and decide what she wants to do.

“You don’t go to these countries and not let your heart break,” she said.

View original article

 

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Melinda Gates: Contraception needs to be on global health agenda


Gates Foundation co-chair delivers lecture at UCLA.

Renee Montagne, left, interviews Melinda Gates (Photo by Todd Cheney, UCLA)

The world has backed away from supporting contraception in the developing world because of politics, and it’s vital to put the issue back on the global health agenda, said Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, in comments today (Nov. 5) at UCLA.

The nonprofit leader was the featured speaker at UCLA’s annual Arnold C. Harberger Distinguished Lecture on Economic Development. She spoke in conversation with Renée Montagne, the co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition.

Investing in women’s health and family planning supports the whole community in sometimes unexpected ways, Gates said.

“If we invest in that lowest level, the primary health care system … you can get unbelievable changes in maternal mortality and infant mortality,” she said. “If you don’t invest in that primary health care system, you don’t have a chance when something like Ebola comes along.”

Empowering women and girls in developing countries to decide whether and when to have a child is a key part of her work at the foundation, Gates said.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Better education about prenatal testing leads to fewer tests


UCSF study shows importance of clear information on all prenatal testing options.

Miriam Kuppermann, UC San Francisco

A clinical trial led by UC San Francisco has found that when pregnant women are educated about their choices on prenatal genetic testing, the number of tests actually drops, even when the tests are offered with no out-of-pocket costs.

The findings underscore the need for clear information on all prenatal testing options and their possible outcomes, including the option of no testing, before pregnant women decide whether or not to have genetic testing, the authors said.

The study also suggests that some women may have undergone prenatal screening for Down syndrome without having full information about the implications of testing, the authors said.

The article is published in today’s (Sept. 24) issue of JAMA.

“Our findings show that prenatal testing is not appropriate for everyone, and that all women need information that is readily understood and unbiased to enable them to make informed choices reflecting their own preferences and values,” said lead author Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., professor and vice chair for clinical research at the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.

“Decisions about prenatal testing are personal and should be reflective of the patient’s own values and preferences, not those of her health care providers,” said Kuppermann.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC Davis names chief of maternal-fetal medicine


David Schrimmer joins from UC San Diego.

David Schrimmer, UC Davis

David B. Schrimmer, a highly respected obstetrician and gynecologist who is expert in the management of complex pregnancies, including multiple gestations and those requiring fetal therapy, has joined the faculty of the UC Davis School of Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology as professor and chief of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine.

Before joining UC Davis, Schrimmer was professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UC San Diego, where he was founding director of the UCSD Fetal Surgery Program, which treats babies in utero. He also was founding director of the UCSD Multiples Program for women with multiple pregnancies.

“I am very excited about the opportunity to create a new division here for women with both straightforward and more complex pregnancies and providing a range of services with highly expert physicians, from conception to delivery,” Schrimmer said.

Schrimmer is highly regarded for treating women carrying multiple pregnancies, including the first set of healthy, surviving sextuplets successfully delivered in California. He also is a leader in treating fetuses with complex anomalies.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

SF celebrates 3 new hospitals with stars, lights and action


UCSF Hard Hat Walk, Lights On Festival draw thousands to Mission Bay.

San Francisco’s Mission Bay district became a melting pot of celebrities, civic dignitaries, community members and assorted creatures of unknown species with dazzling outfits and daring dance moves, as the city marked the upcoming opening of the new UCSF Medical Center.

Thousands joined in Saturday’s revelry, starting with the 5K Hard Hat Walk along the waterfront and through the Mission Bay neighborhood and ending with the Lights On Festival in the public plaza outside the medical center complex. The event culminated in a multicolor light show illuminating the windows of the three hospitals opening on Feb. 1, 2015: UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco, UCSF Bakar Cancer Hospital and UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women’s Hospital.

Donors and attendees of the celebration raised more than $525,000 for the new hospitals, exceeding the fundraising goal of $500,000.

Kicking off the Hard Hat Walk, UCSF Medical Center CEO Mark Laret paid tribute to the construction crew, staff and fundraisers. He urged the crowds to remind themselves that with “every step you take, think about a child whose life is going to be saved in that hospital and a mom who’s going to have an easier birth because of innovations here.”

There was plenty of levity to offset the serious moments.

A number of teams assembled for the walk dressed in fun costumes. UCSF Chief Information Officer Joe Bengfort nixed the sweats in favor of Luke Skywalker duds to lead his team, the Jedi Masters, which raised close to $12,000. The UCSF Cancer Crusaders donned superhero masks and capes; the Children’s Emergency Department team all wore rainbow tutus; and Remembering Maggie McDonald – one of the top patient fundraising teams – sported yellow hard hats in tribute to 19-year-old Maggie, a longtime patient of UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco who passed away earlier this year.

At the festival, families enjoyed pastries, tacos and other tasty treats from top local restaurants, while children got their faces painted, participated in wall art, played bungee run and danced to Vocal Rush, a teen a cappella group from the Oakland School for the Arts. Other participants decompressed with chair messages or a snuggle with a friendly possum from the San Francisco Zoo’s Zoomobile.

Adding razzle-dazzle to the event were Jesse Tyler Ferguson, star of the ABC television show “Modern Family,” Olympic champion figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi and San Francisco Giants home run king Barry Bonds, a longtime friend and supporter of UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco (“my brother from another mother,” according to Ferguson).

The midafternoon sun had segued into an early evening chill by the time celebrated singer and Bay Area native Michael Franti took the stage. But the audience warmed up dancing to his hits, “I’m Alive” and “Say Hey.”

At his invitation, a group of patients joined him on stage. The new hospitals were very personal to him, Franti explained, because his 15-year-old son had been a long-term patient at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco. The audience nodded in unison, knowing the hospitals will play a key role in their health and that of their loved ones for generations to come.

David Chiu, president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, said it best when he addressed the crowd: “This is a moment in time so special for San Francisco.”

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Breastfeeding may delay onset of puberty in girls


Girls with early-onset puberty at risk for multitude of health challenges.

Julianna Deardorff, UC Berkeley

In a recent study, maternal and child health researchers at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health looked into the idea that breast feeding may serve as a protective mechanism to delay onset of puberty in girls. They found that, in some cohorts, girls who were predominantly breastfed (as opposed to predominantly formula fed) showed later onset of breast development.

Girls with early-onset puberty are at risk for a multitude of health challenges, including greater risks of obesity, hypertension and some cancers. Early maturation is also associated with lower self-esteem, higher rates of depression and norm-breaking behaviors, and lower academic achievement.

“These findings are unique in suggesting that exclusive breastfeeding may delay onset of girls’ pubertal timing,” says Julianna Deardorff, assistant professor of maternal and child health and co-author of the study. “Given the limited number of modifiable factors influencing puberty, this is a promising area of research for intervention.”

The study was led by Aarti Kale, M.P.H. ’11, who analyzed data from a population of 1,237 girls recruited across three geographic locations — New York City, Cincinnati and the San Francisco Bay Area. Breast feeding practices were assessed using self-administered questionnaires with the primary caregiver. The girls were seen on an annual basis to assess breast and pubic hair development. In addition to breastfeeding correlating with pubertal onset, duration of breastfeeding was also directly associated with age at onset of breast development. However, a stratified analysis showed the association only in the Cincinnati cohort.

“The results varied across the sites, suggesting that unique characteristics of these cohorts and their environments modify effects,” says Deardorff. “Further research into the contexts within which breastfeeding and girls’ development occur would potentially illuminate sources of variability.”

The study was published in the Journal of Maternal and Child Health.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

After ovarian cancer strikes daughter, mother raises money for research


Paulinda Babbini’s nonprofit raises money to fund ovarian cancer research at UCLA.

Paulinda Babbini and her late daughter, Robin Babbini, who died of ovarian cancer at 20. (Photo courtesy of Paulinda Babbini)

When Paulinda Babbini’s daughter, Robin, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2004 at age 17, the mother’s first reaction was shock. Robin was a typical, active teenager and honor student, co-captain of the cheerleading squad, homecoming queen and involved in the dramatic arts.

How could her baby have cancer at 17 — worse, stage three ovarian cancer?

But Robin did have ovarian cancer, a disease that will strike nearly 22,000 American women this year alone, killing more than 14,000. Ovarian cancer accounts for 5 percent of cancer deaths among women, and causes more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system.

Mother and daughter decided to fight and face the daunting disease together.

As part of her treatment, Robin underwent a total hysterectomy, followed by chemotherapy treatments. Unfailingly optimistic, Robin completed her classes, graduated from high school and began her freshman year at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

But six short months later, Robin’s cancer returned. She underwent another surgery, during which doctors discovered the cancer had spread. She fought on, joining the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority and continuing her studies. She served as co-captain of her team at the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event. And despite her weakened condition, Robin gave a gut-wrenching, inspirational speech, hoping that one day there would be a cure found for ovarian cancer and no one would have to suffer like she had.

Just six weeks later, Robin lost her battle with ovarian cancer at 20.

“Losing a child is an anguish no parent should ever experience. It is utterly devastating. But how to move forward becomes the next challenge,” Babbini said. “I knew I had to shine a light on Robin’s memory and give her brief life a lasting purpose. Committing myself to fundraising to fight ovarian cancer keeps her in my heart.”

Babbini vowed that her daughter would not die in vain. Single-handedly, the grieving mother in 2010 launched the nonprofit The Ovarian Cancer Circle/Inspired by Robin Babbini and set out to raise money for ovarian cancer research. All the money she raises goes to fund the work of Dr. Sanaz Memarzadeh, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UCLA and director of the G.O. Discovery Lab at UCLA.

The donations from The Ovarian Cancer Circle/Inspired by Robin Babbini have enabled Memarzadeh and her team to make critical steps in understanding why ovarian cancers are not detected early and why these tumors often relapse despite surgery and chemotherapy.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

How breast cancer usurps powers of mammary stem cells


Finding provides insight into how aggressive breast cancer might be treated.

Mammary cells found during pregnancy that express integrin beta3 (CD61) act as stem cells, capable of reconstituting a new mammary gland in mice. This property may be to blame for the more aggressive nature of beta3-expressing breast cancer cells. Shown is a section from a mammary “outgrowth” harvested at lactation and immuno-stained for the epithelial markers E-cadherin (brown) and alpha-SMA (red).

During pregnancy, certain hormones trigger specialized mammary stem cells to create milk-producing cells essential to lactation. Scientists at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have found that mammary stem cells associated with the pregnant mammary gland are related to stem cells found in breast cancer.

Writing in today’s (Aug. 11) issue of Developmental Cell, David A. Cheresh, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Pathology and vice chair for research and development, Jay Desgrosellier, Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology and colleagues specifically identified a key molecular pathway associated with aggressive breast cancers that is also required for mammary stem cells to promote lactation development during pregnancy.

“By understanding a fundamental mechanism of mammary gland development during pregnancy, we have gained a rare insight into how aggressive breast cancer might be treated,” said Cheresh. “This pathway can be exploited. Certain drugs are known to disrupt this pathway and may interfere with the process of breast cancer progression.”

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off