TAG: "Pharmacy"

UCSF names vice provost for academic affairs


Clinician-educator-researcher Brian Alldredge to start in new position Nov. 1.

Brian Alldredge, UC San Francisco

Brian Alldredge, UC San Francisco

Brian Alldredge, Pharm.D., associate dean for the UCSF School of Pharmacy for the past 12 years and a member of the faculty for 28 years, has been named vice provost for academic affairs, effective Nov. 1.

Alldredge is a clinician-educator-researcher with research and clinical interests in epilepsy, seizure emergencies, pharmacogenomics and pharmacy education. He holds a joint appointment as a professor of clinical pharmacy in the School of Pharmacy and a clinical professor in the Department of Neurology in the School of Medicine.

In his new role, Alldredge will report directly to Jeffrey Bluestone, Ph.D., executive vice chancellor and provost (EVCP). He will be part of the EVCP leadership team, overseeing all aspects of faculty and academic affairs, including the Chancellor’s Council on Faculty Life, faculty development and advancement programs and initiatives, and supporting the EVCP and chancellor in all their strategic and operational goals related to faculty and academics.

“The role of vice provost, academic affairs, is critical to the well-being and productivity of faculty, and I am pleased that Brian will be taking this on,” Bluestone said. “Brian brings both highly relevant professional experience and a deep personal passion for the issues that arise in faculty affairs.”

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New health professionals need consistent pain management education


Basic skills in pain management sought across education programs for clinicians.

Scott Fishman, UC Davis

More Americans are coping with chronic pain than ever before. Yet clinicians’ understanding of pain and their pain management skills vary widely because no such educational framework exists. Following an Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendation, two UC Davis researchers led a team of experts to develop expectations for consistent, comprehensive pain management education for new health professionals, including nurses, physicians, pharmacists and physical therapists.

In an article scheduled for publication in the July issue of Pain Medicine, “Core Competencies for Pain Management: Results of an Interprofessional Consensus Summit” (available for free, public download at www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/paineducation/Happenings/PainMedicineArticle2013.pdf), UC Davis experts Scott Fishman and Heather M. Young, along with a team of international experts representing various health professions, identify the desired skills and knowledge new health professionals must possess to best care for people with pain. These educational outcomes, known as core competencies, serve as a foundation for the development of comprehensive pain management curricula for early learners in the health professions.

Heather Young, UC Davis

“The current state of educational content for pain management in schools of medicine and nursing, as well as other health professions, is often inadequate,” Fishman said. “The creation, distribution, and ultimately, the adoption of these basic expectations for pain management education is a critical step toward the preparation of more health care professionals who understand and have basic skills to safely and effectively address pain.”

The 2011 IOM report revealed the need for improved pain education for health professionals due to increasing numbers of Americans coping with chronic pain, as well as skyrocketing costs associated with chronic pain. According to the IOM, an estimated 100 million American adults — more than the total affected by heart diseases, cancer and diabetes combined — suffer from chronic pain. Pain costs the nation up to $600 billion annually in medical treatment and lost productivity.

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UCSF names chair of the Department of Clinical Pharmacy


Lisa Kroon to lead the department.

Lisa Kroon, UC San Francisco

Lisa Kroon, Pharm.D., has been named the new chair of the Department of Clinical Pharmacy within the UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy, effective July 1.

Kroon has served as interim chair of the department since July 2012, when the previous chair, B. Joseph Guglielmo, Pharm.D., became interim dean and later dean of the School of Pharmacy.

“The leadership of both the Department of Clinical Pharmacy and the UCSF Medical Center’s Department of Pharmaceutical Services unanimously supported Lisa’s selection,” Guglielmo said. “We are fortunate to have such an accomplished, even-keeled department chair.”

The UCSF School of Pharmacy has the nation’s top-ranked Doctor of Pharmacy degree program, according to U.S. News & World Report, and tops the list for research funding from the National Institutes of Health.

Kroon said the purpose of her department’s work in research, education, and patient care “is to advance the safe and effective use of therapeutics to improve health.”

“The Affordable Care Act has opened a lot of eyes to what quality care can be, how it can be provided, and by whom,” she said. “We’re building the evidence for new ways for pharmacists to improve patient health – and even to lower costs – and to prepare students for what is truly a new day in pharmacy practice.”

The UCSF Medical Center is a close collaborator. Kroon adds, “It’s a potent combination with the potential to improve medication use, safety and effectiveness in patient care settings – inside and outside the hospital – in bold new ways we can’t even imagine today.”

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Study IDs protein essential for normal heart function


Protein being studied to fight cancer; may cause toxicity in cardiac cells.

Asa Gustafsson, UC San Diego

A study by researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Department of Pharmacology at UC San Diego, shows that a protein called MCL-1, which promotes cell survival, is essential for normal heart function.

Their study, published in the June 15 online issue of the journal Genes & Development, found that deletion of the gene encoding MCL-1 in adult mouse hearts led to rapid heart failure within two weeks, and death within a month.

MCL-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) is an anti-apoptotic protein, meaning that it prevents or delays the death of a cell. It is also a member of the BCL-2 family of proteins that regulate mitochondria – the cell’s power producers – and cell death. Aberrant expression of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members is one of the defining features of cancer cells, and is strongly associated with resistance to current therapies. Thus, these proteins are currently major targets in the development of new therapies for patients with cancer.

But, while MCL-1 is up regulated in a number of human cancers, contributing to the overgrowth of cancer cells, it is found at high levels in normal heart tissue. Additionally, the researchers found that autophagy – a process which deals with mitochondrial maintenance and is normally induced by myocardial stress – was impaired in mice with MCL-1 deficient hearts.

In summary, the study demonstrated that the loss of MCL-1 led to rapid dysfunction of mitochondria, impaired autophagy and heart failure, even in the absence of cardiac stress.

“Cardiac injury, such as a heart attack, causes levels of MCL-1 to drop in the heart, and this process may increase cardiac cell death,” said Åsa B. Gustafsson, Ph.D., an associate professor at UCSD Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “Therefore, preserving normal levels of this protein in cardiac tissue could reduce damage after a heart attack and prevent progression to heart failure.”

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Health professions education growing in new directions, UC report finds


Enrollment has increased significantly in medicine, nursing, pharmacy and public health.

Click image to download report

>>Download report

The University of California has issued a report that highlights some of the recent trends associated with the rapid growth in health professional schools and enrollment.

Enrollment in U.S. health professional schools has increased significantly in medicine, nursing, pharmacy and public health, according to the report, “A New Era of Growth: A Closer Look at Recent Trends in Health Professions Education.” For example, there has been unprecedented growth in total U.S. pharmacy student enrollment through expansion of existing programs and the establishment of new schools. Since 2005 alone, the number of accredited pharmacy schools has risen 48 percent (87 to 129).

The total enrollment and number of new U.S. medical schools also has increased. More striking, however, has been the rapid growth in the number of for-profit international medical schools located in the Caribbean and seeking to attract U.S. students. Growth has been more moderate in dentistry, optometry and veterinary medicine.

The report describes some of the changes in health professions education since 2007, when UC issued “A Compelling Case for Growth,” an in-depth review of health workforce needs as part of a systemwide planning effort that helped pave the way for enrollment growth at all five of UC’s longstanding medical schools, establishment of a new nursing school at UC Davis, and the recent accreditation and establishment of UC’s sixth school of medicine at UC Riverside.

The new report reviews the seven fields in which UC has health professional schools. The report also identifies trends and provides information by profession about the number of schools and enrollment in California and nationally. Information regarding current tuition levels by institution also is included.

“As the nation’s largest health sciences instructional program, UC has an important role to play in informing the public about the state of health professions education,” said Dr. Cathryn Nation, UC associate vice president for health sciences. “The ‘New Era of Growth’ report provides a valuable snapshot of trends that deserve our attention and further discussion.”

Trends identified in the report include:

  • Rapid growth in educational programs and total enrollment. Since 2007, the number of U.S. schools in the seven health professions surveyed has grown by 48 percent (865 to 1,283). As a result, enrollment has increased by 34 percent (252,484 to 339,107), with the majority of this growth taking place primarily in medicine, nursing, pharmacy and public health.
  • Development of new programs and business models. For-profit schools and programs have proliferated, both in the U.S. and the Caribbean, where 22 of the 61 medical schools admitted their first classes in the past decade. Non-research institutions have added new schools of pharmacy and dentistry. Accelerated and alternate-entry programs have grown, particularly in nursing. Professional doctorates have increased, as have programs that deliver education online, with growth in online public health programs.
  • Rising student costs and indebtedness. Between 2005 and 2010, UC medical schools experienced a nearly 50 percent increase, on average, in the four-year cost of attendance. Not surprisingly, student debt also is rising. Viewed over a longer period, the increase is even more dramatic. The total cost of attendance has increased for all UC professional degree programs, posing new challenges for students interested in pursuing careers in public service. For example, the average educational debt of veterinary medicine graduates (excluding undergraduate loans) at UC Davis nearly quadrupled from $29,770 in 1993 to $118,772 in 2011.

Recent growth at UC

Across the UC system, relatively modest, planned enrollment growth in medical student enrollment has occurred over the past decade. This has occurred through new UC Programs in Medical Education (PRIME) that focus on the needs of medically underserved communities. Through this special initiative, UC boosted total medical student enrollment by approximately 350 students across the UC system. However, most of this growth, and most that is occurring in nursing, has been unfunded by the state. Major multiyear budget cuts and a lack of state funding also contributed to a delay in the opening of UC Riverside’s new school of medicine, which will welcome its first class of 50 students in fall 2013.

Looking toward the future

Notwithstanding the growth in enrollment and establishment of new schools across the U.S., workforce shortages persist in many health professions, including medicine, public health and others — needs that will increase dramatically as provisions of health care reform take effect. The balance is currently shifting for some professions. In pharmacy, for instance, the profession has experienced such rapid growth in recent years that some estimates suggest a total national supply of pharmacists that may outpace future demand. Amid these many changes, it will be important to monitor the impact that the new schools and programs make, with particular attention to issues of quality, cost and student success, according to the report.

“As the higher education community plans for the future, the importance of maintaining educational quality, improving access and affordability for students, and improving access and health outcomes for patients are among the central goals that must remain in focus,” the report states.

About UC Health
University of California Health includes five academic health centers with 10 hospitals and 18 health professional schools and programs on seven UC campuses — UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UCLA, UC Riverside, UC San Diego and UC San Francisco. For more information, visit http://health.universityofcalifornia.edu.

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New center targets ocean contaminants and human health


Scripps scientists lead two projects to track potentially toxic chemicals in marine life, impacts on human health.

(From left) Paul Jensen, Brad Moore, Eric Allen, Lihini Aluwihare of Scripps and Eunha Hoh of San Diego State University.

Capitalizing on UC San Diego’s unique ability to address environmental threats to public health, a new center based at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego will target emerging contaminants found naturally in common seafood dishes as well as man-made chemicals that accumulate in human breast milk.

With $6 million in joint funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, the new Scripps Center for Oceans and Human Health will track natural chemicals known as halogenated organic compounds, or HOCs. Human-manufactured varieties include polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, chemicals that until recently were manufactured and broadly used in commercial products as flame retardants in the textile and electronics sectors.

Less is known about the natural versions of HOCs that accumulate in marine mammals such as seals and dolphins and have been identified in top predators that humans consume such as tuna and swordfish. While PBDEs are well known for their toxicity and have been linked to a variety of human diseases, including cancer and thyroid ailments, the origin and transmission of their natural counterparts are poorly understood.

The Scripps Center for Oceans and Human Health will investigate the biology and chemistry behind these natural contaminants in the Southern California Bight, from Point Conception in Santa Barbara south to Ensenada, Mexico.

“The new Center for Oceans and Human Health is uniting leading experts in oceanography and medicine, two areas that make UC San Diego one of the best and most unique universities in the world, to address an emerging threat to public health and safety,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “UC San Diego is proud to be leading this effort in collaboration with other prominent institutions around the San Diego region.”

“The Scripps Center for Oceans and Human Health is focused on addressing to what extent nature contributes to the production and transmission of these toxins in the marine environment,” said Bradley Moore, director of the new center and a professor of oceanography and pharmaceutical sciences at Scripps and the UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “Southern California waters will be the focus of our study, in part because our state has the highest reported incidence of polybrominated chemicals in human breast milk in the world.”

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“Sam” Skaggs dies at 89


UC San Diego pharmacy school benefactor “a pioneer, a visionary.”

L.S. "Sam" Skaggs

L.S. “Sam” Skaggs, whose enduring support of pharmacy education and research helped fuel the growth and development of the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego, died Thursday at the age of 89 of causes related to age.

Skaggs built a retail food-and-drug business empire, but the Utah businessman also nurtured a decades-long, widespread interest in promoting the health sciences. In 2004, he and his family’s Institute for Research donated $30 million to UC San Diego’s then-2-year-old School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. It was the largest gift to UC San Diego Health Sciences at the time, and among the largest in UC San Diego history.

“Sam Skaggs was a pioneer, a visionary and a generous philanthropist,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “He helped ensure the success of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. His legacy lives on through his contributions and dedication to the future of pharmaceutical care. We will always be grateful for the positive impact he’s had on the health and well-being of our campus and community.”

The Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, named in Sam Skaggs’ honor, is one of just two pharmacy schools in the UC system and a national leader in pharmaceutical education and research. It boasts more than 150 salaried and volunteer faculty members, with a current enrollment of 240 Pharm.D. and 60 Ph.D. students as well as 30 pharmacy residents.

“Sam Skaggs was instrumental in the development of our school,” said Palmer Taylor, Ph.D., dean of the Skaggs School and associate vice chancellor of health sciences at UC San Diego. “From our humble beginnings in a temporary building, he followed our growth, occasionally offering sage advice. His gift in 2004 was transformational. It gave us the resources and flexibility to not just grow, but excel.”

Skaggs, who resided in Salt Lake City, built his business and fortune growing the Payless Drug Stores chain, which he took over after his father died from a stroke in 1950. He was 26. In 1979, he acquired American Stores, creating the second-largest U.S. food retailer in the United States. In 1995, shortly before he retired, Skaggs headed one of the largest food companies in the world, with 1,700 stores in 26 states and annual revenue exceeding $22 billion.

A significant portion of his wealth was devoted to diverse philanthropic interests, from pharmaceutical education and research throughout the American west to religious interests, which included support of Mater Dei Catholic High School in Chula Vista.

Memorial contributions may be made to the “Skaggs School of Pharmacy Scholarship Fund.” Checks payable to the UC San Diego Foundation can be sent to University of California, San Diego, c/o Andrina Marshall, 9500 Gilman Drive #0657, La Jolla, CA 92093-0657; donations also can be made online at www.givetoucsd.ucsd.edu. Please type “Skaggs School of Pharmacy Scholarship Fund” in the keyword search section.

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UCSF appoints new dean of nation’s top pharmacy school


Pharmacist Joe Guglielmo to lead school.

B. Joseph Guglielmo, UC San Francisco

UC San Francisco has named a highly accomplished pharmacist and clinical scientist, B. Joseph Guglielmo, Pharm.D., to lead the nation’s premier School of Pharmacy, continuing the school’s focus on shaping the course of the therapeutic sciences, pharmacy education, patient care, and health policy.

UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann, M.D., M.P.H., announced the appointment today, noting the numerous contributions that Guglielmo already has made to UCSF, as well as his breadth of leadership across the academic pharmacy landscape.

“In its decades as the pre-eminent School of Pharmacy in the nation, the school has never been stronger, and there is no better dean to guide it into the future,” Desmond-Hellmann said. “Joe is both an able leader and an international expert in his field, and will provide a clear course for the school as it helps guide the changing world of health care.”

As the nation’s leading pharmacy school in terms of both research funding from the National Institutes of Health and the ranking of its Doctor of Pharmacy degree program in U.S. News & World Report, the UCSF School of Pharmacy serves as a bellwether for pharmacy schools worldwide.

“It is a tremendous honor to be named the next steward of this accomplished school,” said Guglielmo. “The caliber of people and the culture of respect and inclusion here are second to none: the faculty is brilliant and collegial; the students are leaders by instinct and experience; and the staff is extremely talented. Excellence is their common ground.”

Guglielmo has served as the school’s interim dean since July 2012. He previously led the school’s Department of Clinical Pharmacy as the Thomas A. Oliver Chair in Clinical Pharmacy.

“We see a time when new, precise therapeutics – drugs, medical devices, and diagnostic tests – are used safely and effectively to improve the health of people everywhere,” he said. “This view will drive my work as dean.”

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UC Health ranks among best in nation


U.S. News gives high marks to UC medical schools.

University of California Health ranked among the nation’s best graduate schools in a survey released today (March 12) by U.S. News & World Report.

Five UC medical schools placed in the top 50 nationally for research rankings and four placed in the top 40 nationally for primary care rankings.

In research, UC San Francisco was the top-ranked public school and tied for fourth among all U.S. schools, with UCLA 13th overall, UC San Diego 15th, and UC Davis and UC Irvine tied for 42nd. In primary care, UCSF ranked fourth, UCLA ranked 11th, UC Davis tied for 19th and UC San Diego tied for 39th, with UC Irvine tied for 66th. UCSF has the only medical school ranked in the top five of both categories.

UC medical schools also received high marks in a number of specialty programs. UCSF ranked first for its medical program in AIDS, second in both internal medicine and women’s health, tied for second in drug/alcohol abuse education, fourth in family medicine, sixth in geriatrics, and seventh in pediatrics. UCLA ranked third in geriatrics, seventh in drug/alcohol abuse education, tied for ninth in AIDS and 10th in women’s health. UC San Diego ranked ninth in drug/alcohol abuse education and 11th in AIDS.

U.S. News’ 2014 America’s Best Graduate Schools rankings were released online today (March 12) and can be viewed at www.usnews.com/grad.

The new rankings include previous assessments of a number of other health fields, which U.S. News also surveys but not each year. UCLA ranked first in clinical psychology, UCSF ranked first in pharmacy, UC Davis ranked second in veterinary medicine, UCSF ranked fourth for both its master’s of nursing program (tied) and its nursing-midwifery program, while in public health UC Berkeley tied for eighth and UCLA was 10th. The surveys do not rank dental or optometry schools.

UC Health runs five academic health centers and the nation’s largest health sciences education system with more than 14,000 students and 18 health professional schools and programs in medicine, dentistry, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, public health and veterinary medicine. UC’s sixth medical school, UC Riverside, will enroll its first class this fall.

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UCSF-Safeway pharmacy alliance aims to help customers quit smoking


Safeway’s pharmacists will be trained in proven smoking-cessation counseling techniques.

B. Joseph Guglielmo Jr., UC San Francisco

The UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy has partnered with Safeway Inc. to help Safeway customers quit smoking, by connecting them with specially trained pharmacists to learn about smoking-cessation programs and other resources.

Under the partnership, Safeway’s pharmacists will be trained in proven smoking-cessation counseling techniques using a program developed by the UCSF pharmacy faculty. The stores also will locate non-prescription, nicotine-replacement therapies near store pharmacy areas, giving customers convenient access to a pharmacist to answer questions. The partnership is designed to give Safeway customers access, in a community setting, to the patient-care expertise of the UCSF School of Pharmacy.

The school, which has the nation’s top-ranked pharmacy degree program, pioneered the field of clinical pharmacy in the 1960s to provide direct interactions between hospital patients and pharmacists.

“Pharmacists are often the most accessible health care provider for patients within their own communities, but we haven’t maximized their expertise in that setting,” said B. Joseph Guglielmo Jr., Pharm.D., interim dean of the UCSF School of Pharmacy. “This project offers Safeway customers the full patient-care skill set of pharmacists with a goal of helping customers prevent and manage their chronic medical conditions.”

The project initially will focus on 20 pharmacy stores in Northern and Southern California and will expand throughout 2013 to include hundreds of Safeway pharmacies across the country.

“We are proud to partner with the UCSF School of Pharmacy on this effort to help our customers quit smoking and live healthier lives,” said Darren Singer, Safeway senior vice president for pharmacy, health & wellness. “Our pharmacists are, at all times, ready to help customers reach their health and wellness goals.”

This will be the first time a smoking cessation intervention has been applied systematically across a network of pharmacies, Singer said. Safeway sees this important new service as complementary to the ever-evolving range of patient-centered care offerings that Safeway pharmacies provide.

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Industry funding changes study results, research shows


Who pays for clinical trial has direct impact on reported outcome.

Lisa Bero, UC San Francisco

Drugs and medical devices tend to appear more beneficial in scientific papers if they were manufactured by the company that sponsored the study, showing that who pays for the clinical trial has a direct impact on the reported outcome, according to a new analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Cochrane Collaboration.

Lisa Bero, Ph.D., a UCSF professor of clinical pharmacy and health policy who heads the San Francisco branch of the U.S. Cochrane Centre, at UCSF; and Joel Lexchin, M.D., a professor of health policy at York University, in Toronto. A definitive analysis in 2003 by Bero and Lexchin found discrepancies across drug studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.

Clinical studies on drugs and medical devices are routinely used by physicians worldwide to assess which medications are most effective and appropriate for their patients. However, that research is increasingly sponsored by the pharmaceutical or device companies that make these products, either because the companies directly perform the studies or fund them. The team set out to assess whether that sponsorship continues to have an impact on results.

“We found that papers reporting the results of industry-sponsored studies present a more favorable picture of the effects of drugs and medical devices than those reporting on studies that were not sponsored by industry,” said Andreas Lundh, of the Nordic Cochrane Centre at the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark, who led the new research and is first author on the paper.

“Of a particular interest was our finding that when two drugs were compared head-to-head in an industry-sponsored study, the drug that came out most favorable in a specific study was most often the drug manufactured by the sponsor of that study,” Lundh said.

The current analysis more than doubled the number of studies from the 2003 review, to a total of 48, and included papers on both drugs and medical devices for conditions ranging from heart disease to psychiatric illnesses. The number of favorable results was 24 percent higher in industry-sponsored studies, compared to non-industry sponsored ones, and included reports of both greater benefits from the drug or medical device and fewer harmful side effects. The team also found that industry-funded papers were more likely to report conclusions that were inconsistent with the papers’ results sections.

“This is really important because it means that people must take sponsorship into account when evaluating whether they should believe the results of a study. This is still rarely done,” said Bero, who is in the UCSF School of Pharmacy. “A fundamental question now is that when a systematic review is entirely based on industry-sponsored studies and finds a favorable result for the sponsor’s product, can we really trust it?”

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International scholars make intellectual, cultural impact at UCSF


UCSF has the most international scholars of any U.S. health sciences university.

Janina Patsch, a visiting scholar from Austria, works on bone micro-structure analysis at her China Basin lab.

As she entered her boss’ office at the Vienna General Hospital in 2010, Janina Patsch, M.D., Ph.D., didn’t know what to expect. A bone specialist by training, pursuing a residency program in diagnostic radiology, Patsch was hoping for an opportunity to pursue her other passion: research.

So the first question Patsch’s boss asked caught her by surprise: Would she like to do research in the United States?

Patsch joined the Musculoskeletal Imaging Center in the UC San Francisco Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging in January 2011. Her work over the past two years under Thomas M. Link, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the department, has focused on developing a better understanding of the micro-architecture and metabolism of the skeletal system, particularly for patients suffering from diabetes. During this time, Patsch has written papers in high-impact journals and presented her research at international meetings.

As an international faculty member himself, Link says he is well aware of his role as an international ambassador and notes that some of the brightest UCSF leaders and faculty – including 2012 Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D., of Japan and 2009 Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn, Ph.D., of Australia – hail from other countries.

“UCSF continues to attract the brightest and most promising scholars chosen by their country,” said Link. “They will go back as leaders in their field and consolidate the role of UCSF as a global leader in medical research.”

Providing a collaborative and inviting environment for international scholars, as well as all faculty, staff and students, is a priority for UCSF.

In 2010, UCSF had the most international scholars of any U.S. health sciences university, and ranked 25th among all U.S. universities with a total of 1,267, according to the Institute of International Education. Of those, 132 were international students enrolled in the schools of dentistry, nursing and pharmacy, as well as the Graduate Division.

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