TAG: "Medical education"

UC San Diego, Perdana partner to advance medical education, research


Collaboration with Malaysian university will bring opportunities for both institutions.

UC San Diego and Perdana University in Malaysia have announced a medical education partnership.

By Jackie Carr, UC San Diego

Officials of UC San Diego and Perdana University in Malaysia have announced a plan to collaborate on further development of the Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine (PUGSOM). UC San Diego was chosen from among the top schools of medicine in the United States to lead this initiative.

“UC San Diego has a long history of excellence in education, research and medicine,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “Our School of Medicine is ranked among the nation’s top graduate programs, and UC San Diego Health System has been ranked number one in San Diego for four consecutive years by U.S. News & World Report. We are excited to share our expertise and knowledge in the power of academic medicine, and collaborate with Perdana University in joint research efforts.”

“Perdana University is delighted to work together with UC San Diego. This collaboration will bring tremendous opportunities to both institutions. This venture will drive Perdana University towards its goal of achieving international distinction as well as bring it recognition as an elite and successful academic institution,” said YABhg Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, chancellor of Perdana University.

The collaboration is designed to help Perdana University (PU) capitalize on the breadth and depth of UC San Diego’s experience in stimulating and helping to sustain San Diego’s status as a major research, health care and biotechnology hub.

“The 10-year joint collaboration will focus on enhancing and implementing a forward-thinking medical curriculum, a model for comprehensive patient care and a platform for innovative world-class research in Malaysia and Southeast Asia,” said David A. Brenner, M.D., vice chancellor for health sciences and dean of the UC San Diego School of Medicine. “Opportunities for clinical research from a global health perspective will exist in many areas, including cardiovascular, neuroscience, tropical diseases, diabetes, cancer and trauma care.”

“This collaboration will help PU to achieve its vision of becoming a top-tier academic medical center serving the 21st century health care needs of Malaysia and the broader region,” said Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Mohan Swami, chairman of the Board of Governors of Perdana University. “It will also accelerate the growth of a vibrant biomedical research, biotechnology and pharmaceutical infrastructure, helping to elevate Malaysia as a global center for translational medicine.”

“This is an exciting and important collaboration that will benefit both universities through shared knowledge and expertise, and especially through joint research,” said Mounir Soliman, M.D., M.B.A., assistant vice chancellor and executive director of UC San Diego Health Sciences International. “Joint research will help improve health in Malaysia and empower Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine to train the future health care workforce. Perdana University is the first medical school in Malaysia to offer graduate entry medical education similar to the United States model.”

Professor Dato’ Sothi Rachagan, vice chancellor, and Ph.D. barrister of law of Perdana University also stated that UC San Diego Health Sciences will assist in creating and refining the organizational infrastructure and facilities necessary for the continued growth of the graduate medical school program, including faculty recruitment, academic program development, student enrollment and the advancement of research and clinical needs.

“We envision a collaboration that will facilitate two-way transfer of knowledge, operational expertise and accrued health care experience to the benefit of both institutions. We are committed to working closely with PU to listen, learn, then plan, and finally bring these plans to fruition,” said Soliman who will lead the planning and implementation of this venture.

The collaboration between UC San Diego and PUGSOM will include exchange of faculty, students and staff. Faculty members from UC San Diego will travel to PUGSOM as visiting faculty to facilitate collaborative educational and research programs. PUGSOM faculty members may travel to UC San Diego to gain valuable skills and knowledge.

“In addition to Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine’s strong education focus, there will be future opportunities for collaboration in biomedical research, including bioengineering and technology, as well as for planned new academic teaching facilities, which include a 600-bed hospital,” said Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Mohan Swami.

Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine was established in 2011 with the vision of contributing to the global community through the pursuit of excellence in education, research and service. PUGSOM is intended to promote intellectual discovery, generate and spread state-of-the art knowledge and be a center of excellence in medical education based on a graduate entry level approach. Perdana University was established as a Public Private Partnership (PPP) initiative with the support of the Economic Planning Unit in the Prime Minister’s Department.

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UCSF, CMC sign letter of intent to increase pediatric, women’s health services


Collaboration to expand services in Valley would build on foundation of existing relationship.

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UC San Francisco

UCSF Medical Center and Community Medical Centers (CMC) have signed a letter of intent (LOI) to expand women’s and children’s services to the Central Valley, which has an undersupply of specialists for a growing population. The collaboration also would broaden medical education services in the area.

CMC, a Fresno-based regional health system, owns and operates Community Regional Medical Center (CRMC) and other licensed general acute care hospitals and outpatient centers in Fresno and Clovis that serve Fresno County and the surrounding counties.

“The delivery of health care is changing. We’re going to rely on medical information technology and strong alliances with private and academic physicians to more efficiently manage the health of entire families. This project with UCSF will be a key part of that,” said Craig Wagoner, CEO at Community Regional Medical Center.

The shared vision of CMC and UCSF includes development of a clinically integrated health system to facilitate better sharing of information in order to manage patient health; improved access to high-quality pediatric services in Fresno and surrounding communities; higher acuity pediatric services at CRMC to reduce the need for patients’ families to travel outside of Fresno; and increased integration of the academic and training missions of UCSF and CRMC.

An immediate goal for 2015 is to increase the availability of specialists at CRMC by this summer.

UCSF School of Medicine, which consistently is ranked among the nation’s top medical schools, has for decades operated a graduate medical education program in collaboration with Community, the San Joaquin Valley’s largest hospital organization.

About 300 UCSF medical residents and fellows currently practice on the Community Regional Medical Center campus, which is the Valley’s Level 1 trauma center. Pediatrics is one of 22 specialties currently offered in the Fresno-based graduate medical education program.

The collaboration among UCSF Fresno, CRMC and Valley Children’s Healthcare has afforded UCSF residents the ability to receive high-quality residency training across the entire spectrum of pediatric needs within a diverse set of clinical settings. UCSF remains firmly committed to maintaining and strengthening this long-time, top-ranked pediatric residency program for the benefit of patients, the community and the entire San Joaquin Valley.

“This is the next logical step in our relationship with Community,” said Michael Peterson, M.D., interim associate dean for UCSF Fresno. “The medical school is committed to serving the Valley, and our leadership team in San Francisco is excited about the opportunity to partner with the Community Regional Medical Center and build a leading-edge women’s and children’s program.”

“We have a great relationship with Fresno and the Central Valley, and this partnership with Community Medical Centers will strengthen that relationship,” said Stephen Wilson, M.D., Ph.D., associate chief medical officer for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital San Francisco. “This is an opportunity to better integrate our women’s and children’s services in the region and support UCSF’s mission to provide care to patients in areas that are underserved.”

UCSF has been providing services in Fresno for decades. Established in 1975 and now celebrating its 40th anniversary, the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program plays a substantial role in providing health care services to residents of California’s San Joaquin Valley and training medical professionals in the region. A clinical branch of UCSF, the Fresno medical education program has trained approximately one-third of Central San Joaquin Valley physicians.

Faculty and medical residents at UCSF Fresno engage in a broad spectrum of research addressing health issues pertinent to the Valley. Faculty and residents also care for the overwhelming majority of the region’s underserved populations at health care facilities like CRMC.

In addition, UCSF Fresno provides academic preparation programs for middle- and high school students interested in the health professions through the Junior Doctors Academy and the Doctors Academy. UCSF Fresno academically prepares students at Fresno State to become competitive applicants to health professional schools and ultimately aims to prepare them for careers in health and medicine. UCSF Fresno also is a key partner in the UC Merced San Joaquin Valley Program in Medical Education.

The collaboration is anticipated to be finalized in the fall of 2015.

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Students resolve to give back


A UC Irvine student-run free clinic opens in Garden Grove to treat underserved patients.

A new, student-run free clinic opens in Garden Grove to treat underserved patients. (Photo by Zach Ferguson, UC Irvine)

By Laura Rico, UC Irvine

Along with losing the holiday waistline and upping the exercise quotient, UC Irvine Anteaters are making resolutions of a different nature this New Year. They’re pledging to make a difference in their communities, and a shining example is the launch of a student-run teaching health clinic in Garden Grove.

Under the supervision of Dr. Baotran Vo, a family medicine and primary care specialist with UC Irvine Health, first- and second-year UCI medical students will staff the clinic. Undergrads will shadow the medical students and handle administrative duties, such as ordering supplies.

Students raised funds to open the free clinic – which began as an undergraduate club project – partly by selling banh mi (Vietnamese sandwiches), hot dogs and hot chocolate on Ring Mall.

Garden Grove residents and UCI students and faculty celebrated the Lestonnac Free Clinic’s grand opening Dec. 13 at the Garden Grove United Methodist Church.

Open every other Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., the clinic is at 12747 Main St.

The effort is just one of many ways UCI is serving the community. The campus recently launched its Fifty for 50 program to promote volunteerism and civic engagement. Participants pledge to donate 50 or more hours of their time and talent over the university’s two-year 50th anniversary period.

The goal is to reach 50,000 hours of volunteer service. Students at the Garden Grove free clinic are off to a healthy start!

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UCLA medical school receives unrestricted $50M gift


Bequest from Irma and Norman Switzer estate creates new fund to advance medicine, health.

UCLA Chancellor Gene Block said the gift stands as “an enduring legacy of two people who clearly cared about the future of medicine and science.”

An unrestricted gift of $50 million to the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA from the estate of Irma and Norman Switzer was announced Nov. 12 at a gathering of faculty, staff members, the school’s board of visitors and friends of the Switzer family.

“This exceptionally generous gift is an enduring legacy of two people who clearly cared about the future of medicine and science,” said UCLA Chancellor Gene Block. “The university is honored to be the steward of such a transformative bequest.”

As a tribute to the couple, the UCLA Center for Health Sciences Plaza, where the announcement was made, was renamed the Irma and Norman Switzer Plaza.

“The Switzers’ extraordinary gift will immediately strengthen the work of our faculty and eventually benefit countless patients,” said Dr. A. Eugene Washington, vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences and dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

“The Switzers, who were very humble people, would be gratified to know that the proceeds from their estate are going to advance medicine and health in such a profound way — and that this beautiful plaza, through which so many patients, physicians, scientists and students pass on a daily basis, will bear their names,” said Theodore Wolfberg, the Switzers’ attorney and friend.

Norman Switzer passed away in 2011 at the age of 84, and Irma died in 2013 at the age of 93. The couple were longtime residents of Pacific Palisades.

A veteran of the Korean War, Norman Switzer devised the concept of adding benches to bus stops throughout Los Angeles. In exchange for funding the bus benches, the city awarded his company, Norman Bench Advertising, a 20-year exclusive on advertising. He later sold the business and became a real estate investor. Irma Switzer, an accomplished weaver and member of the Palisades Weavers group, physically built two homes in Manhattan Beach with a friend. The couple was involved with the Fowler Museum at UCLA and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

“The Switzers’ selflessness manifested in many ways; UCLA’s recognition of their remarkable philanthropy in this vibrant and dynamic space is the highest honor they could ever have imagined,” said Arlynne Siegel, managing director and Los Angeles regional director of the personal trust department of MUFG Union Bank and trustee of the Switzers’ trust.

The bequest will advance medicine and health and will count toward The Centennial Campaign for UCLA, a $4.2 billion fundraising campaign, which was formally launched in May 2014 and is scheduled to conclude in 2019, the campus’s 100th year.

“The forethought the Switzers demonstrated by including UCLA Health Sciences in their estate plans illustrates the generosity that is their legacy,” said Kathryn Carrico, UCLA’s assistant vice chancellor for health sciences development.

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Student conference opens doors to health care professions


UC Davis hosting national pre-medical, pre-health conference Oct. 11-12.

Leading voices in health care and some 8,000 pre-health and pre-medical students will meet to explore the future of health care and how the students can join and influence the professions at the University of California, Davis, Oct. 11-12.

Keynote speakers at the 12th annual UC Davis Pre-Medical and Pre-Health Professional National Conference — the largest conference of its kind in the country — include:

  • United States Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald at 8:30 a.m. Saturday in the Pavilion;
  • U.S. Navy Surgeon General Matthew Nathan at 10 a.m. Saturday in the Pavilion;
  • California Department of Public Health Director Ronald Chapman at 10 a.m. Saturday in Rock Hall;
  • American Medical Association CEO James L. Madara;
  • National Hispanic Medical Association President and CEO Elena V. Rios;
  • American Osteopathic Association  President Robert S. Juhasz;
  • Harvey Fineberg, former president of the Institute of Medicine; and
  • presidents and CEOs of leading national organizations in the health professions.

See the complete list.

Making welcoming remarks at 8 a.m. Saturday in the Pavilion on the Davis campus will be Adela de la Torre, vice chancellor of Student Affairs at UC Davis, and UC President Janet Napolitano.

“At the University of California, we want to empower students from across our state to discover and achieve their dreams in health care and contribute to the care and welfare of their communities and society as a whole,” Napolitano said. “This conference is an opportunity for young students to spark their passions in the medical fields.”

With the theme of “Empowering the Next Generation of Health Care Professionals,” the conference aims to introduce students to careers and educational opportunities in health care and help them achieve their goals.

The conference is organized by the UC Davis Pre-Health Student Alliance with the support of de la Torre’s office. The alliance is a partnership of pre-medical and pre-health student organizations, fraternities and sororities at UC Davis and other colleges in Sacramento. More than 400 students from throughout the region serve as leaders and volunteers for the conference.

Among those attending are high school, community college and university students; school counselors; and parents.

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Influx of faculty join UC Irvine


School of Medicine claims 14 of 77 new hires.

UC Irvine’s new faculty members were welcomed at a University Club event Sept. 23. (Photo by Steve Zylius, UC Irvine)

UC Irvine deans introduced new faculty members last week during a welcoming event at the University Club. The 2013-14 cohort of 77 recruits is one of the largest ever at UCI and includes 13 full professors and one dean.

Chancellor Howard Gillman, Ph.D., hailed the newcomers as “people who make us better by bringing fresh perspectives and ever higher aspirations for impact in our disciplines and on our world.”

“You are what our ongoing progress looks like,” he told those gathered.

Gillman encouraged them to do all they could to support diversity – among both the faculty and student populations.

“We have a diverse student body,” he said, adding that 43 percent qualify for federal assistance with fees and tuition. “There is no challenge President Obama can give with regard to social mobility that we haven’t already met, and those students are yearning for your commitment.”

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Community colleges could be key in increasing student diversity for medical schools


Medical students who attended community college more likely to serve in poor communities.

IMPACT
The community college system represents a potential source of student diversity for medical schools and physicians who will serve poor communities; however, there are significant challenges to enhancing the pipeline from community colleges to four-year universities to medical schools. The authors recommend that medical school and four-year university recruitment, outreach and admissions practices be more inclusive of community college students.

FINDINGS
Researchers from UCLA, UC San Francisco and San Jose City College found that, among students who apply to and attend medical school, those from underrepresented minority backgrounds are more likely than white and Asian students to have attended a community college at some point. Community college students who were accepted to medical school were also more likely than those students who never attended a community college to commit to working with underserved populations.

The study also found that students who began their college education at a community college were less likely to get admitted to medical school than those students who never attended a community college or only attended a four-year university.

Using data from the 2012 Association of American Medical Colleges matriculant and applicant files and the AAMC’s Matriculating Student Questionnaire, researchers examined the association between students’ participation in a community college pathway, medical school admission and intention to practice medicine in underserved communities or work with minority populations.

Of 40,491 medical school applicants evaluated, 17,518 enrolled in medical school. Of those, 4,920 (28 percent) had attended a community college concurrently with high school, after high school or following graduation from a four-year college or university in order to take courses in preparation for medical school.

The researchers found that a higher proportion of underrepresented minority matriculants used the community college pathways compared with white students or other racial and ethnic groups. Thirty-four percent of Latinos had attended community colleges, (538 of 1,566 matriculants), compared with 28 percent of black students (311 of 1,109), 27 percent of white students (2,715 of 9,905), 27 percent of Asian students (963 of 3,628) and 30 percent of students identifying themselves as mixed-race or other race (393 of 1,310).

Applicants who attended community college after high school before transferring to a four-year college or university were 30 percent less likely to be admitted, compared to those students who never attended a community college or only attended a four-year university to medical school, after adjusting for age, gender, race and ethnicity, parental education, grade point average and MCAT score. The same group also was 26 percent more likely to intend to practice medicine in an underserved area than their non-community college educated peers.

AUTHORS
The research was conducted by Dr. Efrain Talamantes, Dr. Carol Mangione, Karla Gonzalez and Dr. Gerardo Moreno of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Dr. Alejandro Jimenez of UC San Francisco; and Fabio Gonzalez of San Jose City College.

FUNDING
The work was supported by Veterans Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations through the VA/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at UCLA. Dr. Moreno received support from a National Institute on Aging (NIA) Paul B. Beeson Career Development Award and the American Federation for Aging. Dr. Mangione received support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, the UCLA Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research/Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly under a National Institutes of Health/NIA grant, and the NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute. Dr. Mangione holds the Barbara A. Levey and Gerald S. Levey Endowed Chair in Medicine, which partially supported this work.

JOURNAL
The study was published online by Academic Medicine.

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Medical school test drives curriculum redesign


UCSF redesign is ‘the most meaningful thing to happen in medical education in 100 years.’

UCSF School of Medicine faculty and staff brainstorm ways to redesign the curriculum at a medical education retreat in March.

With today’s dynamic health care environment and rapidly advancing biomedical sciences, medical education must change so that students will be ready for the world that awaits them eight or 10 years from now.

The way students are trained currently ensures that they are going to be good at solving individual diseases and addressing individual organs, said Anna Chang, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at UC San Francisco. But, she added, we haven’t been as successful in teaching students how to work within teams and systems and improve the health of entire populations, in addition to individual patients.

“For medicine to advance, we must find a way to give our students this expanded set of skills,” Chang said.

The UCSF Bridges Curriculum Redesign is aiming to address the ever-widening gap between what medical students are being taught and what they need to learn to function as modern physicians.

For more than two years, committees captured the vision of what the new Bridges curriculum should include and hammered out the framework that reflects that vision. It was then distilled into a blueprint that was approved by the Faculty Council in June.

“Over the past year, the vision of Bridges has moved from a big idea to an exciting reality,” said Catherine Lucey, M.D., vice dean for education at UCSF School of Medicine. “That reality is the direct result of the creative energy and collaborative efforts of literally hundreds of UCSF faculty, staff and students who have come together to create strategies to improve the curriculum.”

The new Bridges Curriculum will be rolled out in two stages, beginning with the academic year 2015-2016.

“This is a pioneering effort,” said Chang, director of the Bridges Curriculum. “I think that Bridges is the most meaningful thing to happen in medical education in 100 years.”

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UCSF appoints interim medical school dean


Bruce Wintroub, previously vice dean, has served UCSF for more than 32 years.

Bruce Wintroub, UC San Francisco

Bruce Wintroub, M.D., has been named interim dean of the UCSF School of Medicine while a search committee looks for a permanent replacement. Chancellor Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., made the announcement today (Sept. 11).

“I am deeply grateful to Bruce for his dedicated service and commitment to lead the School through this transition period,” said Hawgood, who served as dean of the School of Medicine until Wintroub’s appointment. “I am confident that he is well equipped to serve in this role and to ably steer the school through the months ahead.”

Wintroub has served UCSF for more than 32 years. Most recently he has served as vice dean of the School of Medicine, a position he held for 10 years. Wintroub is also a professor and has been chair of the Department of Dermatology since 1985.

“I am delighted, honored and privileged to serve in this capacity for the School of Medicine and UCSF,” he said. “I deeply appreciate the trust and confidence the chancellor has in me.”

Wintroub will maintain his responsibilities in the Department of Dermatology, including his position as chair.

He also has led the Dermatology Foundation, a nonprofit organization that develops and retains tomorrow’s teachers and researchers in dermatology. Wintroub has helped raise more than $60 million for the organization.

He earned a bachelor’s degree at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts, and a medical degree at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Wintroub completed residencies and fellowships at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (internal medicine) and Harvard Medical School (immunology and dermatology) and was a member of the Harvard Medical School faculty for six years before joining UCSF in 1982.

A search committee, co-led by Catherine Lucey, M.D., vice dean for education in the School of Medicine, and Shaun Coughlin, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute, has been charged to make recommendations to find a permanent School of Medicine dean.

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UC president encourages aspiring doctors in Fresno


Janet Napolitano meets with Doctors Academy students at UCSF Fresno.

UC President Janet Napolitano talks with high school students from UCSF Fresno’s Doctors Academy at a discussion that included officials from UCSF (pictured from left are UCSF Fresno Associate Dean Joan Voris, Doctors Academy founder Katherine Flores and UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood), UC Merced and UC medical students and residents. (Photos by Francis Fung, UCSF Fresno)

By Alec Rosenberg

University of California President Janet Napolitano visited UCSF Fresno today (Sept. 5), where she encouraged high school students to pursue their dreams of becoming doctors and help address the severe physician shortage in the San Joaquin Valley.

Napolitano met with 20 students from UCSF Fresno’s Doctors Academy, a challenging academic preparation program at three high schools in Fresno County. The star students, who come from educationally disadvantaged backgrounds, had questions about whether they could afford college and how they could overcome their self-doubt.

The path to become a physician is long and intense, but it’s a worthy journey that’s within reach, said Napolitano and colleagues who included UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood, UC Merced Chancellor Dorothy Leland and UC medical students and residents.

“Never doubt that you have what it takes to succeed as a doctor, nurse or whatever field you’re considering,” said Napolitano, who described how she overcame challenges in college, explained its affordability and encouraged students to consider applying to UC.  “You are exactly the kind of smart, motivated and compassionate students UC wants.”

High school students at UCSF Fresno’s Doctors Academy tell UC President Janet Napolitano why they are in the Doctors Academy and interested in becoming health professionals.

Napolitano’s message resonated with Doctors Academy students such as Sunnyside High School senior Carlos Villalobos, who wants to become a physician in the valley so he can serve his community. “I feel it’s my calling,” he said.

Villalobos had been interested in attending an Ivy League college, but after listening to Napolitano, he was inspired to change his mind.

“I want to go to UC,” Villalobos said. “I got to see how big a family we are with UC.”

Indeed, UC trains nearly half of the medical students and residents in California. In the San Joaquin Valley, UCSF, UC Merced and UC Davis all have efforts to address health issues and the shortage of physicians practicing in the region.

The UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program was established in 1975. UCSF Fresno annually now trains approximately 290 medical residents and fellows (an increase of 100 in the past 10 years) and about 250 medical students on a rotating basis. Since its inception, the program has graduated more than 2,000 resident physicians. About 40 percent of medical residents who graduate from UCSF Fresno stay in the area to provide care for community members.

“It shows the efficiency of training residents locally — they tend to stay here,” said Dr. Joan Voris, UCSF Fresno associate dean.

UCSF Fresno also has pipeline programs to prepare health care professionals. The Doctors Academy serves 336 high school students. The Junior Doctors Academy is an academic enrichment program for 186 motivated seventh- and eighth-grade students, while the Health Careers Opportunity Program at Fresno State provides academic support to prepare select students for entry into graduate programs and health professional schools

Dr. Katherine Flores, a Fresno native who was raised by her migrant farmworker grandparents and became the first in her family to attend college, founded the Doctors Academy in 1999 to open doors for students like her. All Doctors Academy graduates go on to college, with 98 percent matriculating into four-year colleges and universities. Three students from the inaugural class have received medical degrees and are in primary care residencies.

“In the Central Valley, we don’t have enough health care providers,” said Flores, who directs the UCSF Fresno Latino Center for Medical Education and Research. “We wanted to grow our own.”

The Doctors Academy students also met with San Joaquin Valley PRIME students. PRIME is an innovative training program focused on meeting the needs of California’s underserved populations, with 330 total students in six programs. UC Davis, UC Merced and UCSF Fresno collaborate on SJV PRIME, which launched in 2011 and now enrolls 27 students — all of whom have expressed interest in staying in the Valley to practice and/or work with underserved communities.

Maricela Rangel-Garcia, a third-year SJV PRIME student and Clovis native who was part of the inaugural class at UC Merced, encouraged Doctors Academy students to find mentors.

“The doubt will never go away,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to reach out to new people who will help you along the way.”

Agustin Morales, a fourth-year SJV PRIME student and Mexico native who received a bachelor’s degree from UC Santa Cruz, agreed.

“Look for people who are positive, inspirational, who will guide you in unfamiliar terrain,” said Morales, who is interested in internal medicine and plans to apply for residency at UCSF Fresno. “You end up empowering yourself to do what you want to do.”

Along with SJV PRIME, UC Merced continues to develop health sciences research programs. It has established a Health Sciences Research Institute, offers a minor in public health and collaborates with UCSF Fresno on research into valley fever.

As part of her visit to Fresno, Napolitano met with UC Merced and UCSF campus leaders to discuss health issues in the San Joaquin Valley and how UC is addressing needs and the funding challenges associated with efforts to help improve health in the region. For example, the Doctors Academy used to receive nearly $1 million a year in federal grant funding, but that has stopped. Also, state funding only covers about one-third of all PRIME slots.

In the meantime, the San Joaquin Valley has just 45 primary care physicians per 100,000 people, while the recommended level is 60 to 80.

UCSF Fresno medical resident Andres Anaya, a Fresno native, encourages high school students from UCSF Fresno Doctors Academy to become physicians. (From left: Sidra Suess, a fourth-year San Joaquin Valley PRIME student, and Erica Gastelum, a UCSF Fresno pediatric resident.)

UCSF Fresno medical resident Andres Anaya encouraged Doctors Academy students to join him in addressing that shortage. Anaya was born the eldest son of Mexican immigrants, both of whom are deaf. His first language was American Sign Language. At the age of 5, he began translating for his family. His college guidance counselor told him college wasn’t for everyone. Later in life, he suffered an industrial accident, which landed him in the emergency department and left him temporarily paralyzed.

“It changed my perception,” Anaya said. “Everything became possible.”

Anaya graduated from UCSF medical school and now is a physician in Fresno.

“Every day I get to do something I love,” Anaya said. “I’m literally living the dream. I’m home.”

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Medical schools urged to increase enrollment of undocumented immigrants


Accepting students eligible for federal DACA program could help address nation’s shortage of primary care physicians, UCLA center says.

Youhali Balderas-Medina Anaya, UCLA

A paper by researchers at the UCLA Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture urges medical schools to do more to increase their enrollment of undocumented immigrants seeking access to the medical professions.

The authors of “Undocumented Students Pursuing Medical Education: The Implications of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” published in the current issue of the journal Academic Medicine, suggest that these students, who are often highly motivated and qualified, can help alleviate the nationwide shortage of primary care physicians, particularly in underserved, low-income areas.

“This country is in great need of primary care physicians to fill the ongoing shortage, yet qualified undocumented pre-medical students are still being denied access to medical schools because of concerns regarding their status,” said Dr. Yohualli Balderas-Medina Anaya, a resident physician in the department of family medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the paper’s lead author.

The authors suggest that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an initiative signed by the Obama administration in 2012 that allows certain young undocumented immigrants to work legally in the U.S. without fear of deportation, could help shore up the numbers.

“With DACA,” Anaya said, “undocumented pre-med students can help address this growing shortage. We are calling upon the medical and academic community to support undocumented students applying to medical school. We can all benefit from helping these students enter and successfully complete medical school.”

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New law helps grads of accelerated medical programs


UC co-sponsored bill signed by governor will allow more physicians to practice in California.

A new law sponsored by the University of California will allow graduates of accelerated and fully accredited medical education programs to become licensed physicians in California by as early as January 2015.

AB 1838, co-sponsored by UC and the Medical Board of California and introduced by Assembly Member Susan Bonilla, will allow more physicians to practice in California and help doctors incur less student debt. Gov. Jerry Brown signed the bill into law last week.

The law previously required California physicians to complete a medical curriculum over at least four academic years with a minimum of 4,000 hours of coursework. Those provisions created a barrier for well-qualified graduates of accelerated programs who were interested in practicing in the state.

There is already a shortage of medical doctors in California and it is estimated that the state will need an additional 8,000 primary care physicians by 2030. Debt is another problem facing students pursuing medical degrees; the median debt for graduate students is $175,000. AB 1838 addressed both problems by allowing students to finish their training sooner. It also allows California medical facilities to recruit physicians who have attended accelerated programs in other states.

The UC Davis School of Medicine is the first UC campus to offer an accelerated program. The Accelerated Competency-based Education in Primary Care (ACE-PC) program provides approximately three years of medical school training after which students move directly into a primary care residency program operated by UC Davis or Kaiser Permanente of Northern California.

“We want to thank Assembly Member Susan A. Bonilla and the Medical Board of California for their leadership on this important and timely legislation,” said Dr. Cathryn Nation, UC associate vice president for health sciences. “UC is proud that its School of Medicine at Davis, in partnership with Kaiser Permanente, developed the first accelerated medical education program in California, enrolling its first class of six students in June 2014. Now future graduates from this primary-care focused program and other accelerated programs will have a clear path to medical practice in California.”

The accelerated programs enable students to complete a more concentrated, modified year-round education schedule that often eliminates summer breaks and involves reduced time for electives.

The University of California operates six of California’s nine M.D.-granting medical schools and provides specialty training for nearly half of the state’s medical residents.

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