TAG: "Geriatrics"

Keeping roadways safe as America grays


Doctors, law enforcement receive training in assessing elderly drivers.

Every day in America roughly 10,000 people turn age 65. To help keep roadways safe as America grays and to help preserve the freedom of mobility of older drivers, researchers at the UC San Diego School of Medicine are training law enforcement officers to recognize warning signs of impaired driving skills and to take appropriate, compassionate action. They are also training doctors to think more about their patients’ ability to drive safely with age.

The educational program, known as Training, Research and Education for Driving Safety (TREDS) was recently awarded its eighth consecutive year of funding from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

“Our goal is to reduce the number of fatalities involving older drivers and to prolong the time that seniors can drive safely,” said Linda Hill, M.D., M.P.H., professor of family and preventive medicine and TREDS program director.

“Our program focuses on educating people about the effects of aging on driving skills and the need to assess older people for driving impairments,” she said. “We also teach doctors about conditions and medications that can impact a persons ability to drive safely at any age, especially older adults.”

This year’s funding provides continued support for training courses for physicians and local law enforcement officers in Southern California. In addition, the UC San Diego team will offer a train-the-trainer program to law enforcement officers who go on to teach the program material to colleagues. A primary focus is identifying signs of dementia and other medical conditions that can impair safe driving. Identified drivers may be referred to the California Department of Motor Vehicles for further assessment.

In the coming year, researchers say they will continue to expand their training program to reach law enforcement officers throughout the state.

Since 2006, UC San Diego researchers have conducted in-person TREDS training to more than 9,000 doctors and 3,000 law enforcement officers. Companion TV, radio and online efforts have reached an estimate 1 million people.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCSF, UC Berkeley scientists team up in new Center for Aging Research


Glenn Center exploring role of decline in protein quality-control in dementias, other illnesses.

Andrew Dillin, UC Berkeley

Researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have teamed up to create an innovative, integrated center for research on neurodegenerative diseases. Supported by a $3 million grant from the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, the new center aims to pave the way to developing novel treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease by investigating the many ways that proteins can malfunction within cells.

In particular, the center’s work will focus on a type of protein called the prion, which displays characteristics of infectious agents and is responsible for “mad cow” disease and a related, devastating human brain disorder known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

Stanley B. Prusiner, M.D., UCSF professor of neurology, and Andrew Dillin, Ph.D., the Thomas and Stacey Siebel Distinguished Chair of Stem Cell Research at UC Berkeley and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, will co-direct the new inter-campus program, known as the Paul F. Glenn Center for Aging Research. Ten additional researchers from UCSF and 13 from UC Berkeley will contribute to the center’s work, with more recruitments to come.

Stanley Prusiner, UC San Francisco

“The Glenn Foundation is pleased to welcome UCSF and UC Berkeley to the Glenn Consortium for Research in Aging,” said Mark R. Collins, president of the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, which is based in Santa Barbara. “I had the pleasure to work with Dr. Dillin previously, when he led the Glenn Center for Aging Research at the Salk Institute for Biological Sciences prior to moving to UC Berkeley. I’ve known Dr. Prusiner and followed his work for many years and it is a propitious time for us to assist these two leaders in biological research to discover treatments for age-related neurodegenerative disease.”

In 1997, Prusiner, director of UCSF’s Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of prions, which he demonstrated were an abnormally folded form of normal proteins that set up a template for replication in the brain. According to Prusiner, recent work provides persuasive evidence that, in addition to mad cow disease and CJD, many common neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, are caused by abnormally folded forms of normal proteins functioning as prions.

Dillin agrees that prions are ideal targets for research and novel therapeutic approaches. “The Glenn Foundation’s confidence to support our hypothesis is greatly appreciated,” he said, adding that the combination of UCSF’s medical mission with the strong basic research traditions of both campuses will make the new Glenn Center’s work uniquely powerful.

Proteins are crucial for many of a cell’s normal functions, but as people age, cells’ quality-control mechanisms become less efficient. Normally these systems ensure that proteins are properly formed, and target badly formed or “worn-out” proteins for destruction. But as the effectiveness of cellular quality control wanes over time, improperly formed proteins, including prions, can begin to accumulate.

Badly formed proteins, called “misfolded” by biologists, cannot carry out their required functions and, even worse, they can stick to one another and to other cellular components, sometimes leading to devastating physiological consequences. Prions are particularly problematic because they can act like a template, converting properly formed proteins into additional prions, essentially spreading protein misfolding like an infection.

Seeking ways to counteract the accumulation of misfolded proteins, the new Glenn Center’s researchers will investigate the many cellular quality-control mechanisms that act throughout a protein’s lifetime, from when proteins are first made, to the interactions that help them reach their proper functional state, to the transport processes that take them to their final destinations, to their ultimate degradation when they can no longer serve their purpose.

Together, the UCSF and UC Berkeley researchers affiliated with the center have complementary expertise in all of these areas, and the center’s ultimate goal is to develop new anti-prion drugs, Dillin said. “At Berkeley, we aim to build the basic scientific knowledge to leverage clinical and therapeutic discoveries at UCSF.”

According to Prusiner, “the newest research indicates that Alzheimer’s alone kills as many people every year as cancer does, but it only receives one-tenth of the funding that we dedicate to cancer research. We are grateful to The Glenn Foundation for their support in the battle against neurodegenerative diseases.”

View original article

Related link:
Tackling tomorrow’s health challenges

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

SeniorHealth Center is designated as patient-centered medical home


UC Irvine center’ s team approach highlights comprehensive care for aging adults.

Lisa Gibbs, UC Irvine

UC Irvine Health is proud to announce that the SeniorHealth Center has become one of the country’s first Patient-Centered Medical Homes focusing on geriatric care.

Certified by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the Patient-Centered Medical Home designation reflects the Affordable Care Act’s emphasis on improving patients’ health through a team-based approach that coordinates primary and specialty care to provide for all of a patient’s needs, produce better health outcomes and drive down the cost of care by focusing on patient-centered care. This includes coordinating higher levels of care for chronic conditions, providing preventive care, and empowering patients in managing their own health, as well as increasing access and implementing new ways of delivering care.

The center’s disease management focus is on diabetes, heart failure and dementia. Patients and families will experience optimal care and coordination from a whole team resulting in a customized approach to their care.

“We are very excited about this achievement because it enhances our mission of caring for older adults in a very personal manner through interdisciplinary teamwork,” said Dr. Lisa Gibbs, medical director of the UC Irvine Health SeniorHealth Center and chief of the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology in the UC Irvine School of Medicine. “Our program is committed to compassionate and comprehensive care that revolves around the needs of our patients and families.”

NCQA is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to improving health care quality. Its recognition programs are built on evidenced-based, nationally recognized clinical standards of care.

The UC Irvine Health geriatrics team includes physicians, pharmacologists, psychologists, social workers, nurses and others and places a major emphasis on enhancing quality of life for patients and their families by providing primary care and understanding the changing health needs of aging adults.

Patients come to the SeniorHealth Center to see geriatric medicine specialists for many conditions specific to older adults, including healthy aging, as well as specific concerns such as memory loss, falls, frailty, urinary incontinence and functional decline. Older adults can see physicians for one-time consultations or for primary care.

UC Irvine Health has long taken a team approach to integrating primary and specialty care. The program in geriatrics is well known nationally for its groundbreaking clinical, education and research programs. The center is ranked 39th among the nation’s top hospitals for senior care by U.S. News & World Report.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

How to delay the aging process by ‘remote control’


UCLA biologists ID gene that can slow the aging process.

David Walker, UCLA

UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems.

Working with fruit flies, the life scientists activated a gene called AMPK that is a key energy sensor in cells; it gets activated when cellular energy levels are low.

Increasing the amount of AMPK in fruit flies’ intestines increased their lifespans by about 30 percent — to roughly eight weeks from the typical six — and the flies stayed healthier longer as well.

The research, published Sept. 4 in the open-source journal Cell Reports, could have important implications for delaying aging and disease in humans, said David Walker, an associate professor of integrative biology and physiology at UCLA and senior author of the research.

“We have shown that when we activate the gene in the intestine or the nervous system, we see the aging process is slowed beyond the organ system in which the gene is activated,” Walker said.

Walker said that the findings are important because extending the healthy life of humans would presumably require protecting many of the body’s organ systems from the ravages of aging — but delivering anti-aging treatments to the brain or other key organs could prove technically difficult. The study suggests that activating AMPK in a more accessible organ such as the intestine, for example, could ultimately slow the aging process throughout the entire body, including the brain.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Project launched to develop depression care for older adults


UC Davis and University of Washington receive $2.5M grant from Archstone Foundation.

Ladson Hinton, UC Davis

UC Davis and the University of Washington are implementing a project to develop innovative new models of care for depression in older adults through a $2.5 million grant from the California-based Archstone Foundation, a private grant-making organization whose mission is to contribute toward the preparation of society in meeting the needs of an aging population. The grant launches Archstone Foundation’s Depression in Late Life Initiative to improve the quality of life for older adults suffering from depression.

The work of this grant is based on a one-year systematic review of the literature and current practice. It will advance care for late-life depression by supporting innovative approaches to promote partnership and collaboration among primary care clinics, family members, friends and community-based organizations. Through the Archstone Foundation’s Depression in Late Life Initiative, a number of organizations will also be funded to carry out this effort in California.

Depression is common among older adults and comes at a high cost to patients and their families. Major depression affects 2 to 5 percent of older adults in the community, 5 to 10 percent of older adults in primary-care settings, and as many as 50 percent in nursing homes.

The UC Davis group will be led by Ladson Hinton, professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a nationally recognized expert in minority mental health and aging. Hinton is the director of the Latino Aging Research Resource Center and the education core of the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center. The University of Washington group is led by Jürgen Unützer, chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Washington, and the developer of the Improving Mood–Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT) model, the leading collaborative care program for late-life depression, which has been implemented in more than 500 clinics around the country.

“This initiative will help build on the success of collaborative care and include important partners, such as family members and community-based organizations,” Hinton said.

“While we have evidence-based treatments for depression in primary care, such as collaborative care, very little work has been done to mobilize community agencies (i.e. adult-day health programs, senior centers, meals on wheels, faith-based organizations) and families to help in the process,” he said. “Archstone Foundation’s Depression in Late Life Initiative addresses this important gap in the field, and may also help to engage groups at risk for under-treatment of their depression, such as ethnic minority elders and older men.”

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Nursing dean to receive national gerontological research award


UC Davis’ Heather Young honored for contribution to gerontological nursing research.

Heather Young, UC Davis

The founding dean for the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis, Heather M. Young, was recently named the 2014 recipient of the Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award by the nation’s largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging — the Gerontological Society of America (GSA).

The honor, presented by GSA’s Health Sciences Section, is bestowed upon a member of the society in recognition of outstanding and sustained contribution to gerontological nursing research.

“This honor means a great deal to me because GSA is the first major research organization I joined as a doctoral student in 1986,” Young said. “GSA has offered me a foundational perspective on gerontology and research because it is so interdisciplinary. I am able to understand the field from so many perspectives beyond the clinical, including policy, urban planning, the arts and humanities, as well as basic sciences.”

Young has attended more than 20 of the annual meetings and is a regular presenter and convener.
“Through this organization I have established a strong network of collaborators and colleagues in gerontology — experts who have helped shape my research and provided advice and mentorship over the years. I also had the opportunity to meet and mentor many up and coming scholars and learn from them about their priories and perspectives in this field,” she said. “In large part, due to GSA, the field of gerontology has grown and flourished. It is exciting to be part of this development over almost three decades.”

In addition to serving as the founding dean for the 5-year-old nursing school at UC Davis, Young also serves as associate vice chancellor for nursing and a member of the executive leadership team for UC Davis Health System. She is a nationally recognized expert in gerontological nursing and rural health care. Her research and clinical interest is the promotion of healthy aging with a particular focus on the interface between family and formal health care systems.

Her systems research focused on medication management and safety in rural, assisted-living settings and technological approaches to promoting medication safety in rural hospitals, as well as the use of telehealth and community-based strategies to promote health for rural older adults. Young leads an interprofessional team of UC Davis researchers on a recently approved $2.1 million Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute study looking to improve health for individuals with diabetes. Young is also a collaborator of the Initiative for Wireless Health and Wellness at UC Davis and the Center for Information Technology Research for the Interest of Society, initiatives bringing together nursing, medicine, engineering and computer science to address compelling health issues. She is co-director of the Latino Aging Research Resource Center, a National Aging-funded Research Center for Minority Aging Research.

She is active in the implementation of the recommendations of the landmark Institute of Medicine report, “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health,” serving on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Strategic Advisory Committee that guides the national campaign as well as the California Action Coalition executive committee, which leads activities at the state level. She recently served as a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Working Group on Systems Engineering for Healthcare. Earlier in her career, Young practiced as a geriatric nurse practitioner in community-based long-term care and served as chief operations officer for a company designing and managing retirement communities.

The award presentation will take place at GSA’s 67th annual Scientific Meeting, which is set for Nov. 5-9 in Washington, D.C. The conference is organized to foster interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers, educators and practitioners who specialize in the study of the aging process.

View original article

Related link:
Patient-centered research projects receive funding

 

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Healthy lifestyle may reduce stress-related cell aging


UCSF study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate impacts of stress.

Eli Puterman, UC San Francisco

A new study from UC San Francisco is the first to show that while the impact of life’s stressors accumulate over time and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well.

“The study participants who exercised, slept well and ate well had less telomere shortening than the ones who didn’t maintain healthy lifestyles, even when they had similar levels of stress,” said lead author Eli Puterman, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at UCSF. “It’s very important that we promote healthy living, especially under circumstances of typical experiences of life stressors like death, caregiving and job loss.”

The paper will be published in Molecular Psychiatry, a peer-reviewed science journal by Nature Publishing Group.

Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes that affect how quickly cells age. They are combinations of DNA and proteins that protect the ends of chromosomes and help them remain stable. As they become shorter, and as their structural integrity weakens, the cells age and die quicker. Telomeres also get shorter with age.

In the study, researchers examined three healthy behaviors – physical activity, dietary intake and sleep quality – over the course of one year in 239 post-menopausal, non-smoking women. The women provided blood samples at the beginning and end of the year for telomere measurement and reported on stressful events that occurred during those 12 months. In women who engaged in lower levels of healthy behaviors, there was a significantly greater decline in telomere length in their immune cells for every major life stressor that occurred during the year. Yet women who maintained active lifestyles, healthy diets and good quality sleep appeared protected when exposed to stress – accumulated life stressors did not appear to lead to greater shortening.

“This is the first study that supports the idea, at least observationally, that stressful events can accelerate immune cell aging in adults, even in the short period of one year. Exciting, though, is that these results further suggest that keeping active, and eating and sleeping well during periods of high stress are particularly important to attenuate the accelerated aging of our immune cells,” said Puterman.

In recent years, shorter telomeres have become associated with a broad range of aging-related diseases, including stroke, vascular dementia, cardiovascular disease, obesity, osteoporosis diabetes, and many forms of cancer.

Research on telomeres, and the enzyme that makes them, telomerase, was pioneered by three Americans, including UCSF molecular biologist and co-author Elizabeth Blackburn, Ph.D. Blackburn co-discovered the telomerase enzyme in 1985. The scientists received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009 for their work.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Aging brain influenced by experiences throughout life


Study from UC Davis and University of Victoria examines demographics and cognitive aging.

Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study by researchers with the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center and the University of Victoria, Canada, has found.

“Declining cognitive function in older adults is a major personal and public health concern,” said Bruce Reed, professor of neurology and associate director of the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

“But not all people lose cognitive function, and understanding the remarkable variability in cognitive trajectories as people age is of critical importance for prevention, treatment and planning to promote successful cognitive aging and minimize problems associated with cognitive decline.”

The study, “Life Experiences and Demographic Influences on Cognitive Function in Older Adults,” is published online in Neuropsychology, a journal of the American Psychological Association. It is one of the first comprehensive examinations of the multiple influences of varied demographic factors early in life and their relationship to cognitive aging.

The research was conducted in a group of over 300 diverse men and women who spoke either English or Spanish. They were recruited from senior citizen social, recreational and residential centers, as well as churches and health-care settings. At the time of recruitment, all study participants were 60 or older, and had no major psychiatric illnesses or life threatening medical illnesses. Participants were Caucasian, African-American or Hispanic.

Read more

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCLA doctor to lead major trial to prevent fall-related injuries among older adults


New patient-centered strategies to be tested in large, multisite trial.

David Reuben, UCLA

Each year, one in three adults aged 65 or older falls, and a third of these falls result in moderate to severe injuries that can lead to further declines in health and a loss of independence. Thousands of older adults also die every year from such falls.

To find effective, evidence-based strategies to address the personal and public health burden of these falls, the National Institutes of Health and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) have joined together to support a clinical trial to test individually tailored interventions to prevent fall-related injuries. The award, made by the NIH’s National Institute on Aging and funded by PCORI as part of the two organizations’ Falls Injuries Prevention Partnership, is expected to total $30 million over the five-year project.

The trial will be led by Dr. David Reuben of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Dr. Shalender Bhasin of  Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School; and Dr. Thomas Gill of Yale School of Medicine. The team will include more than 100 researchers, stakeholders and patients and their representatives at 10 clinical health system sites across the country. First-year funding of $7.6 million was awarded on June 1.

“For too long, we have known what care processes are needed to reduce the risk of injuries due to falls. However, we haven’t been able to get these care processes done in practice,” said Reuben, chief of the UCLA Division of Geriatrics. “This study will develop and test a new approach to ensure that patients at risk of falling are participants in determining what falls-prevention care is right for them and ensuring that they get that care.”

The study’s approach differs from others in that it will integrate proven fall-reduction strategies into a cohesive intervention that can be adopted by many health care systems.

“This collaboration with PCORI exemplifies our efforts to go beyond the norms to solve the nation’s health issues,” said Dr. Francis S. Collins, director of the NIH. “The problems we face are complex and therefore require thoughtful and complex solutions. I am hopeful this initiative will greatly improve the lives of those most at risk for falls.”

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Study suggests depression, early death among seniors with disabilities linked


Depressed people less likely to adhere to prescribed medications, diet, exercise.

Carol Mangione, UCLA

People with diabetes have about double the risk of premature death as people of the same age without diabetes. Studies also have shown that they have about twice the odds of suffering from depression, which further increases their mortality risk.

A new UCLA-led study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that among adults 65 and older with diabetes, depression is linked with a far greater chance for early death compared with people of the same age who do not have depression.

The researchers suggest that the higher mortality rate among those with depression could stem from the fact that depressed people are less likely than their non-depressed counterparts to adhere to their prescribed medications, diet, exercise and glucose self-monitoring.

The link between depression and mortality among people with diabetes has been the subject of many other studies, but this is the first to specifically compare the phenomenon as it affects those 65 and older with how it affects younger people, said Lindsay Kimbro, project director in the division of general internal medicine and health services research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and the study’s lead author.

Each participant was given a baseline survey and was contacted for a follow-up survey six to seven years after the initial interview.

“We found that depression mainly increases the risk of mortality among older persons with diabetes,” she said. “Although depression is an important clinical problem for people of all ages, when you split the different age groups, depression in the younger group doesn’t lead to increased mortality six to seven years later.”

A significant number of previous reports have linked diabetes and depression with an increased risk for premature death, but Kimbro said it now appears that those results may have been influenced by a focus on elderly patients.

The researchers analyzed information on 3,341 people with diabetes. Their data came from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes, a study that collected health insurance claims, medical chart review, and phone interviews from 10 health plans in eight states.

The UCLA-led team reviewed information for patients 65 and older (1,402 people) and those who were 18 to 64 (1,939 participants), and measured mortality risk as the number of days until death since the time of the interview. The researchers controlled for age, gender, race and ethnicity, income, and co-morbidities such as heart and kidney disease associated with diabetes.

As in previous studies, the results revealed that the risk for early death among depressed people with diabetes was 49 percent higher than among those without depression. However, the correlation was even more pronounced among older adults: Researchers found a 78 percent higher mortality risk among those 65 and older than they did among non-depressed people with diabetes within that age group. For the younger participants with diabetes, the effect of depression on their risk for early death was not statistically significant.

“Our findings highlight the importance of screening for depression among older adults with diabetes, and of encouraging treatment for those who screen positive,” said Dr. Carol Mangione, a study co-author who holds the Geffen School’s Barbara A. Levey, M.D., and Gerald S. Levey, M.D., endowed chair.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

‘Physician partners’ free doctors to focus on patients, not paperwork


Patient satisfaction increases when doctors have help on administrative tasks.

David Reuben, UCLA

Primary care physicians already have enough administrative duties on their plates, and the implementation of electronic medical records has only added to their burden. As a result, they have less time to spend with their patients.

But a new UCLA study suggests a simple way to lighten their load: a “physician partner” whose role would be to work on those administrative tasks, such as entering information into patient records, that take up so much of doctors’ time. A physician partner allows doctors to focus more of their attention on their patients and leads to greater patient satisfaction with their care, the UCLA researchers say.

The study is published online in the peer-reviewed journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Patients want their doctors to spend time with them and give them the attention that makes them feel more confident in their medical care — they don’t want to just sit there while their doctor is on the computer,” said Dr. David Reuben, chief of the division of geriatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the study’s primary investigator. “This also saves physicians a huge amount of time after patient sessions end, enabling them to spend more time with their families, keep up with the latest developments in medicine and come back refreshed the next day.”

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC San Diego launches Center on Healthy Aging and Senior Care


Dilip Jeste named first associate dean and director of center.

Dilip Jeste, UC San Diego

Dilip V. Jeste, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, has been appointed the first associate dean for healthy aging and senior care at UC San Diego and will direct the newly established Center on Healthy Aging and Senior Care.

The appointment recognizes the broad and growing interest, research and need to improve and promote the long-term health and well-being of older Americans, who comprise an ever-larger percentage of the U.S. population. In 2009, roughly 1 in 8 Americans was 65 years and older. In 2030, that ratio is projected to be 1 in 5.

As the Estelle and Edgar Levi Chair in Aging and director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, both at UC San Diego, Jeste has long been a leading scientist and advocate for greater understanding of how Americans age – and how to help them do so well and healthfully.

“When I first became involved in this type of research two decades ago, aging was viewed as all doom and gloom. Old age was defined by disease, dementia, disability and death. But I’ve found that aging has an important positive side, too. There is, of course, some physical decline and cognitive impairment with aging, but several parts of  psychosocial functioning actually improve. In terms of well-being and emotional regulation, as people get older, even if they are more physically impaired, they tend to be more satisfied with life. It’s the paradox of aging, and it’s something that I think we must address, explore, investigate and understand. We need to stop thinking about how older people are a burden to society and instead focus on how they are a foundation, the personification of resilience, knowledge and wisdom.”

David Brenner, M.D., vice chancellor for health sciences and dean of the School of Medicine, said the new center will help make UC San Diego a local, national and global leader “in not just clinical care, research and training, but also in innovation and health policy for seniors. And Dr. Jeste is, with his unsurpassed scientific expertise, vision and tireless advocacy in these areas, ideally suited to lead this collaborative effort across the campus.”

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off