TAG: "Diversity"

New reality of California ‘DREAMers’ takes shape at UCSF


Three undocumented immigrants chosen to join UCSF School of Dentistry’s class of 2019.

By Marc Fredson, UC San Francisco

José Carrasco Sandoval, Laura Aguilar and Angie Celis typify the caliber of talent UC San Francisco attracts. These California residents are standout students and want to give back to their communities after they graduate. All three have been chosen to join the School of Dentistry’s class of 2019.

Unlike most of their peers, all three are “DREAMers,” a term used to describe undocumented immigrants under the age of 31 who entered the United States before the age of 16 and have lived continuously in the country for at least five years while staying out of legal trouble. Those who meet these criteria outlined by the federal Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act are often referred to as “DREAMers.”

Carrasco Sandoval, Aguilar and Celis’ acceptance and enrollment at UCSF represent a particular milestone in the midst of shifting political winds. They will join Jirayut Latthivongskorn, a first-year DREAMer student in the School of Medicine.

“I was always hopeful that this day would come,” said Celis, who was born in Guatemala and immigrated to the San Fernando Valley with her family when she was two. “It took me longer to make it, but now I’m here.”

“Ever since I was in high school, I knew I wanted to be a doctor,” said Carrasco Sandoval, who graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in molecular and cell biology. “I also knew from an early age that our family had a special condition we called sin papeles, which means ‘without papers’ in Spanish, and that realizing my dream would be a challenge without having legal citizenship.” His parents left their native Jalisco, Mexico, and settled down in Napa when he was 2 years old.

Aguilar’s story is similar to Celis’ and Carrasco Sandoval’s. Her parents also made Napa their home after leaving Guadalajara, Mexico, when she was four. “I’ve wanted to be a dentist since I was young but remember thinking it didn’t seem possible because of my status,” she said. “I decided to just keep trying and to stay positive.”

The door to their dreams edged open with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, a new American immigration policy implemented by the Obama administration in June 2012. The policy allows certain immigrants — otherwise known as “DREAMers,” to receive a renewable two-year work permit and exemption from deportation.

Because of DACA, “for the first time, I could apply for programs, internships, jobs, scholarships and financial aid to help pursue my professional goals,” Aguilar said. “Not to mention simpler things like getting a driver’s license, establishing credit and opening a bank account.”

UCSF has a long-standing commitment to building a broadly diverse student community. As such, its leadership, faculty and staff work hard to create programs that provide additional support for students from underrepresented groups.

“Students with diverse backgrounds, such as those with DACA status, bring an important component to the University,” said John D.B. Featherstone, Ph.D., dean of the UCSF School of Dentistry. “One of my highest priorities is that we do everything possible to open the doors to dental education for the best and the brightest, regardless of their social or economic backgrounds.”

All three dreamers are products of the UC system. Carrasco Sandoval and Aguilar pursued their undergraduate studies at UC Berkeley and UC Riverside, respectively, while Celis received a Master of Science degree in oral biology from UCLA.

As an initial introduction to UCSF, Aguilar attended the Office of Diversity and Outreach’s “Inside UCSF” program, an annual two-day event geared toward students at two- and four-year degree schools who are interested in pursuing careers in health and science. “The students and faculty I met at ‘Inside UCSF’ were very inspiring, welcoming and supportive,” she said. “They encouraged us to keep working and made us aware of available resources.”

Carrasco Sandoval enrolled in a first-of-its-kind post-baccalaureate program offered by the School of Dentistry. “The purpose of the program is to help those who have demonstrated the ability to overcome hardship and who we think will ultimately be successful here,” said James Betbeze, assistant dean for enrollment management and outreach at the School of Dentistry.

“These students are three of the brightest, most driven individuals I’ve encountered,” said Daniel Ramos, D.D.S., Ph.D., a professor at the UCSF School of Dentistry who supported them through the process. “They’ve overcome insurmountable odds to be in a position to be able to help the community from which they came.

“DACA students are often particularly committed to underserved populations, because they may grow up in communities without ready access to dental care. They personally understand those challenges and have an inherent motivation to try and address them.”

Celis plans to continue being an activist in the immigrant community. “I feel an obligation to help the underserved community and to use my experience to help those who have hopes and dreams of going into higher education,” she said.

Carrasco Sandoval envisions working in a community dental practice. “At some point, I’d like to be a director for a community clinic, where I can help low-income and immigrant populations,” he said.

When Aguilar volunteered at a health clinic in Riverside, “I saw the adversities that others face and realized how lucky I was to have parents that supported my education,” she said. “I saw huge disparities, not just in health, but in education and in the way that people’s lives played out.” Aguilar tentatively plans to be a general dentist, and is also considering specializing in periodontics.

“The incredible and proud accomplishments of these students demonstrate that their aspirations go beyond the pursuit on an undergraduate degree,” said Alejandra Rincón, Ph.D., chief of staff to the vice chancellor of diversity and outreach, and an author of a book focused on undocumented immigrants’ access to higher education. “We welcome these students and congratulate their families as they enter this new face of their professional lives.”

Like other young people with DACA status, Carrasco Sandoval, Aguilar and Celis see themselves as more than future dentists. Because of their backgrounds and the opportunities they’ve been given, each seeks to make life better for others.

“I’ve seen the good that comes from when someone believes in you and gives you a chance,” said Aguilar. “It has shaped the kind of role model I want to become.”

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments (0)

Rate of Latino physicians shrinks as Latino population swells


UCLA study calls for action at national, state levels to increase ranks of Latino physicians.

By Enrique Rivero, UCLA

Latinos are one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, with their numbers having risen 243 percent since 1980. Yet the number of Latino physicians per 100,000 Latinos has declined by 22 percent during that period, according to new research.

In 1980, there were 135 Latino physicians for every 100,000 Latinos in the U.S.; by 2010, that figure had dropped to just 105 per 100,000. Meanwhile, the national rate of non-Hispanic white physicians increased from 211 for every 100,000 non-Hispanic whites to 315 per 100,000.

The numbers point to a worsening shortage of doctors who have the language skills and cultural familiarity needed to serve Latino patients, according to a new study from UCLA’s Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture. The study, published online by the peer-reviewed journal Academic Medicine, calls for action at the national and state and levels to increase the ranks of Latino physicians.

Dr. Gloria Sanchez, the paper’s lead author, said the shortage could negatively affect health care for U.S. Latinos.

“For example, there is a shortage of health care professionals that, at minimum, have the language skills to communicate effectively with patients, provide quality care and avoid harmful outcomes for a growing majority of patients not only in California but in the nation as a whole,” said Sanchez, an associate clinical professor of family medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and faculty member at Harbor–UCLA Medical Center.

The study drew U.S. Census data from 1980 through 2010 in five states with large Latino populations — California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas. The researchers found similar declines in the rates of Latino physicians in each of the five states, albeit with small variations.

The study is an update to a 2000 paper by David Hayes-Bautista, a UCLA professor of medicine and director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the Geffen School of Medicine who also was a co-author of the new paper. The earlier research found Latinos made up 4.8 percent of all physicians in California, while making up 30.4 percent of the state’s population; the same study projected that the number of Latino physicians in California would decrease 6 percent by 2020.

Sanchez said the researchers were surprised by the 22 percent drop in the rate of Latino physicians, a decline that was in stark contrast to the 49 percent increase in non-Hispanic white physicians over the same period.

Prior research has found that Latino physicians are far likelier than non-Hispanic whites to practice in communities with large concentrations of Latinos, and that underrepresented minorities such as Latinos, African-Americans and Native Americans are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to practice in areas with large underserved minority populations.

Other research has shown that Latino patients who have limited English-language skills visit doctors less frequently than those with stronger English proficiency.

The study did have some limitations: The researchers were limited by the strengths and weaknesses of the self-reported census data, and the census does not consider issues related to quality of care.

The findings point to a need for further research into Latinos’ health care needs, Sanchez said.

“Our research finds a very concerning trend of a growing Latino population that may not have the ability to find physicians who can provide language and culturally concordant care,” she said. “It demonstrates the urgent need for analysis of how the rapidly growing Latino population will have adequate access to high-quality care both now and in the future.”

The study’s other co-authors were Theresa Nevarez of UCLA and Werner Schink of the California Department of Social Services. The research was funded by the UCLA Hispanic Center of Excellence.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Act of courage: Life after the ‘die-in’


UCSF med students sparked a national movement with #whitecoats4blacklives; what’s next?

UC San Francisco professional students led a national movement via social media that examined how racial disparities impact health care. (Photo by Leland Kim, UC San Francisco)

By Leland Kim and Laura Kurtzman, UC San Francisco

A group of UCSF medical students gathered in a closed meeting last month to talk about race, racism and racial disparities.

They were troubled by recent grand jury decisions not to indict white police officers who were involved in the deaths of two unarmed African American men, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner in New York City, and wanted to channel their frustration into something constructive.

The students, including many from the UCSF Underrepresented In Medicine (UIM) mentoring program, decided to hold a “die-in” at UCSF while wearing their white coats, symbolic of those in the health profession. They and their peers of all ethnic backgrounds tapped into student networks across the country.

In just five days, a national movement called #whitecoats4blacklives was born.

It catalyzed thousands of students, faculty and staff in more than 80 colleges across the country. At UCSF, students from all professional schools (dentistry, medicine, nursing and pharmacy) and the Graduate Division participated, as well as some faculty and staff members.

The hashtag dominated social media on Dec. 10, garnering widespread media attention and sparking a much-needed national conversation about racism being more than a just criminal justice issue.

Organizers of the student #whitecoats4blacklives die-in were invited to participate in the School of Medicine leadership retreat to share their experiences. (From left) Frederick Jamison, Angela Broad, Faby Molina, Adali Martinez, Donald Richards, Stephen Villa, Sidra Bonner and Nicolás Barceló. (Photo by Elisabeth Fall)

“As students, we were able to use the momentum from the #whitecoats4blacklives movement to demonstrate the urgency of dealing with the issues of race, micro-aggressions and inequality that affects UCSF faculty, staff, students and most importantly the patients we all serve,” said student organizer Sidra Bonner, a second-year student in the School of Medicine. “It is my hope that this movement leads to improvement of the social medicine curriculum, specifically continued learning and skill development around this issue of bias, creation of a robust mentorship/advising system for all students, as well as commitment to strengthening the pipeline for underrepresented students in medicine by increased availability of scholarships and administrative support.”

A priority for the university

The die-in had a ripple effect across UCSF.

A student-initiated town hall held two days after attracted faculty members, deans and many of the University’s top leaders, who talked openly with students about the UCSF’s ongoing challenge with diversity.

Chancellor Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., has made race and racial inequities a priority in his administration.

“This is an issue that goes beyond any one school or department; this is a campus issue,” he said. “Diversity is going to be an important priority for the entire UCSF community. I thank our students for initiating this conversation.”

And organizers of the School of Medicine’s annual leadership retreat this month decided to change the event’s agenda to discuss the enduring question of race in America – and how racial dynamics play out at UCSF.

“Our students are asking us to acknowledge, to think and to do something about the problem of racial and ethnic injustices,” said Bruce Wintroub, M.D., interim dean of the School of Medicine, introducing a daylong colloquy that was rich in both data and personal stories about what it means to be black and brown in America.

“It is very easy to talk about racial disparities at other places,” he said. “It is much harder for us to take an honest look at the problems we have at UCSF.”

Groundbreaking discussion of race

The leadership retreat, which took place on Jan. 8 and 9, was the first one ever to focus solely on race/ethnicity and health disparities. It came as the School of Medicine has launched a six-year, $9.6 million effort to hold its departments accountable for achieving diversity, provide the resources to recruit and retain a more diverse faculty, create a culture of diversity and inclusion and expand the pool of scientific talent, which gets smaller at each level of training.

“This retreat was the first time in my 32 years at UCSF that I feel we have started to have an authentic conversation about race and the impact of racism and unconscious bias on our students, faculty and patients,” said Renee Navarro, M.D., Pharm.D., vice chancellor of diversity and outreach. “I applaud the students who organized and implemented the #whitecoats4blacklives movement. They were the spark that led to this event.”

Some of those students were invited to participate in the leadership retreat and share their experiences with the group to help facilitate organizational change.

At times, nervous energy was palpable as students recalled instances of racism on campus. Some community members, participants noted, have accused UCSF being an “elitist ivory tower.”

White faculty members listened attentively, and some were candid enough to admit that they hadn’t really thought about racism and its impact on students and patients in a meaningful way.

“Being on the panel and speaking to an audience of accomplished and powerful people at UCSF were terrifying,” said Angela Broad, a second-year medical student. “It was really difficult sharing those experiences but the informal conversations I had throughout the day were very heartening. So many faculty, deans and staff thanked me for sharing my story.”

Compelling presentations and anecdotes by faculty of color helped shape the day’s conversation.

Neal Powe, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., vice chair of the Department of Medicine and chief of medical services at San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, shared a story about being pulled over by the police in North Carolina while in town to give a lecture. A police officer suspiciously questioned Powe about his destination, instructed him to keep his hands on the steering wheel and asked him if he had drugs in the car.

Guest speaker Denise Rodgers, M.D., focused on the impact of race and racism on health and health care in her talk, helping the audience to understand how a climate of violence affects their patients and their health.

“When we teach about homicide, do we reinforce the stereotype of violent, lawless black men who should be feared and for whom there is little hope for change?” asked Rodgers, vice chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. “When we teach about homicide, do we talk about poverty, unemployment, poorly-performing schools, inadequate access to social and mental health services as contributors to the homicide rates we see?”

Nurturing a pipeline of UCSF talent

This year, one-third of first-year medical students are underserved minorities (black, Latino, Native American or Pacific Islander), the highest percentage of any medical school in California.

Despite having one of the most diverse student populations in the nation, a recent survey found that nearly one-third of students who are black, Latino and Native American reported feeling shunned or ignored or having experienced behavior they found intimidating, offensive or hostile, and 21 percent said it interfered with their ability to learn. That was double the percentage reported by whites and a third higher than reported by Asians.

Talmadge King, M.D., chair of the Department of Medicine, said the medical school is doing well at recruiting students, but many are not staying for their residency training.

Retention drops more at the fellowship training level and then essentially stops at the faculty level. Similar statistics also apply to the other professional schools and the Graduate Division.

King believes the best long-term strategy is for UCSF to build its own pipeline of talent, beginning with middle and high school, so students learn to love science and have an association to UCSF. “Places that have really focused on that are beginning to have success,” he said. ”It takes a long time, but it actually works.”

Turning words into action

UCSF leadership will review and evaluate ideas that were generated by the retreat participants and determine the priorities and tactics to move them forward. This effort is aligned with the campus obligation to the University of California Office of the President to identify initiatives in the UC-wide Climate Survey. Those initiatives will include one that is focused on establishing a “climate of inclusion.”

Meanwhile, the students who organized the #whitecoats4blacklives event have formalized the creation of the national White Coats for Black Lives organization that was born out of the movement. They are connected with 83 representatives of various medical schools throughout the country and are in the process of creating a national board for their student organization.

They will also be actively involved in working with faculty and leadership to achieve the goals identified during the leadership retreat.

“I have never felt so inspired by UCSF – what it is and what it can be,” said student organizer Nicolás Barceló, a fourth-year medical student who attended the retreat. “My decision to attend UCSF was motivated by the belief that its capacity to effectively address the social determinants of health, it stands alone. No other institution can bring together the resources, talent and dedication to social justice that you see at UCSF. No one.”

View original article

CATEGORY: SpotlightComments Off

UC med centers named health care equality leaders


LGBT survey honors four UC med centers.

The nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights organization has again named four University of California medical centers as “Leaders in Healthcare Equality.” UC Davis, UCLA, UC San Diego and UC San Francisco medical centers earned top marks for their commitment to equitable, inclusive care for LGBT patients and their families, who can face challenges in accessing adequate health care.

UCSF Medical Center became the only institution in the United States to have received a perfect score on the national Healthcare Equality Index for seven consecutive years.

The Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s 2014 Healthcare Equality Index designated 426 health care facilities as leaders for meeting key criteria for equitable care, including non-discrimination policies for LGBT patients, non-discrimination policies for employees, a guarantee of equal visitation for same-sex partners and parents, and training for staff in LGBT patient-centered care.

Related links:

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Community colleges could be key in increasing student diversity for medical schools


Medical students who attended community college more likely to serve in poor communities.

IMPACT
The community college system represents a potential source of student diversity for medical schools and physicians who will serve poor communities; however, there are significant challenges to enhancing the pipeline from community colleges to four-year universities to medical schools. The authors recommend that medical school and four-year university recruitment, outreach and admissions practices be more inclusive of community college students.

FINDINGS
Researchers from UCLA, UC San Francisco and San Jose City College found that, among students who apply to and attend medical school, those from underrepresented minority backgrounds are more likely than white and Asian students to have attended a community college at some point. Community college students who were accepted to medical school were also more likely than those students who never attended a community college to commit to working with underserved populations.

The study also found that students who began their college education at a community college were less likely to get admitted to medical school than those students who never attended a community college or only attended a four-year university.

Using data from the 2012 Association of American Medical Colleges matriculant and applicant files and the AAMC’s Matriculating Student Questionnaire, researchers examined the association between students’ participation in a community college pathway, medical school admission and intention to practice medicine in underserved communities or work with minority populations.

Of 40,491 medical school applicants evaluated, 17,518 enrolled in medical school. Of those, 4,920 (28 percent) had attended a community college concurrently with high school, after high school or following graduation from a four-year college or university in order to take courses in preparation for medical school.

The researchers found that a higher proportion of underrepresented minority matriculants used the community college pathways compared with white students or other racial and ethnic groups. Thirty-four percent of Latinos had attended community colleges, (538 of 1,566 matriculants), compared with 28 percent of black students (311 of 1,109), 27 percent of white students (2,715 of 9,905), 27 percent of Asian students (963 of 3,628) and 30 percent of students identifying themselves as mixed-race or other race (393 of 1,310).

Applicants who attended community college after high school before transferring to a four-year college or university were 30 percent less likely to be admitted, compared to those students who never attended a community college or only attended a four-year university to medical school, after adjusting for age, gender, race and ethnicity, parental education, grade point average and MCAT score. The same group also was 26 percent more likely to intend to practice medicine in an underserved area than their non-community college educated peers.

AUTHORS
The research was conducted by Dr. Efrain Talamantes, Dr. Carol Mangione, Karla Gonzalez and Dr. Gerardo Moreno of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Dr. Alejandro Jimenez of UC San Francisco; and Fabio Gonzalez of San Jose City College.

FUNDING
The work was supported by Veterans Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations through the VA/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at UCLA. Dr. Moreno received support from a National Institute on Aging (NIA) Paul B. Beeson Career Development Award and the American Federation for Aging. Dr. Mangione received support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, the UCLA Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research/Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly under a National Institutes of Health/NIA grant, and the NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute. Dr. Mangione holds the Barbara A. Levey and Gerald S. Levey Endowed Chair in Medicine, which partially supported this work.

JOURNAL
The study was published online by Academic Medicine.

View original article

 

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Dental school’s diversity pipeline a success


UCLA School of Dentistry outreach program helps underrepresented students.

Raquel Ulma went from growing up in a poor neighborhood in Puerto Rico to graduating from UCLA School of Dentistry to getting accepted into the UCLA Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery program. (Photo by Brianna Aldrich, UCLA)

When Raquel Ulma moved to Los Angeles with her husband, Greg, in 2002, he knew that it was time for her to start making her lifelong dream of becoming a dentist a reality, even though she had no idea how.

So Greg encouraged her to attend the annual California Dental Association session with a friend. “I actually crashed the dentistry event,” confessed Ulma, who goes by “Rocky.” “I approached the Hispanic Dental Association booth and struck up a conversation with a female dentist who was approachable and welcoming.”

Soon Ulma was telling Dr. Lilia Larin about her goal of becoming a dentist. The two exchanged contact information and Larin told her to expect a call from a faculty member from UCLA School of Dentistry who was starting a program designed to help people apply to dental school.

The next day, Drs. Marvin Marcus and Bruce Sanders contacted Ulma. Marcus told Ulma that she was the perfect candidate for his new program aimed at recruiting disadvantaged and underrepresented students into dentistry. She was from a poor neighborhood in Puerto Rico and had the basic science foundation, having majored in chemistry at the University of Puerto Rico and had completed master’s level coursework in organic chemistry.

“To be honest,” Ulma said, “I was a little star-struck that a school such as UCLA would have an interest in me.”

Shortly after her first contact with Marcus, Ulma became one of the first students to participate in UCLA School of Dentistry’s then-fledgling recruitment initiatives and helped paved the way for the current Post-Baccalaureate program, which guides students step-by-step, through the daunting dental school application process. Since 2003, the program has mentored 40 post-baccalaureate students, 30 of whom have gone on to attend dental school. The program, which is funded in part by UCLA School of Dentistry Dean No-Hee Park’s office, is the first of its kind in Southern California.

“Our educational pipeline initiatives are something I am very proud of and are an important element of our outreach and diversity goals,” said Dr. Park. “Our Post-Baccalaureate Program has helped young people reach their full potential and has enriched the dental field with professionals from all backgrounds.”

For Ulma, the coaching began with a meeting at the School of Dentistry’s Office of Student Affairs where Marcus and Sanders reviewed her undergraduate transcripts, looked at her dental admission test (DAT) scores and went over a draft of her application essay. Ulma had strong grades from her undergraduate work, but needed to work on her DAT scores and wasn’t as strong in the interview portion. Knowing this, Marcus and Sanders helped set-up a mock-interview panel that resemble an actual interview she would eventually face.

“The mock interview panel was a lot harder than I expected,” she said. “They asked a lot of questions, such as why I would be a good fit for that particular school and what makes me a good candidate for dental school.”

They also advised her to do some volunteer work in dentistry, so Ulma immediately began volunteering at the Wilson-Jennings-Bloomfield UCLA Venice Dental Center – a community clinic in West Los Angeles that provides dental care to low-income adults and children.

The entire process took about a year and a half, from reviewing her prerequisites and retaking the DAT to applying to numerous schools and interviewing. After that though, Ulma was accepted to her top choice, UCLA, and began dental school in 2004.

“Looking back at how far I’ve come is sometimes unbelievable,” Ulma said.

Originally from Levittown, Puerto Rico, a rough, urban neighborhood outside of the country’s capital, Ulma recalls the area where she grew up as, “a very bad neighborhood with high pregnancy rates, drug dealers and teenagers getting shot.”

Ulma’s police officer father also owned a woodworking shop where he made furniture to supplement his salary, and he would regularly bring her to the shop to keep her out of trouble.

“It was the experience of working with my father in his shop where I fell in love with using my hands to make something beautiful, yet functional,” she said.

Rather than follow her father exactly, though Ulma chose to pursue dentistry to combine her love of working with her hands along with helping people.

With the support of her husband and faculty at UCLA, Ulma achieved her long-held dream of becoming a dentist when she graduated with the D.D.S. class of 2008.

“During dental school, I would often meet with Dr. Marcus for breakfast and he would remind me to take it day-by-day,” she recalled. The support she received from Marcus and Sanders has inspired Ulma to volunteer her time to assist other students with their dental school applications.

Dental school was just the beginning for Ulma. In 2008, she successfully applied to and was accepted to the UCLA Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) residency program, a highly competitive program that only offers two slots per year out of approximately 100 applications. Ulma graduated from the OMS residency program with an M.D. degree and a certificate of specialization in oral and maxillofacial surgery this June.

“She is truly a remarkable individual and I believe she will be a model for many women and minorities in the future,” Marcus said.

While in the OMS residency program Ulma met Dr. Earl Freymiller, professor of clinical dentistry and chairman of the section of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Freymiller, an oral surgeon, introduced Ulma to the Thousand Smiles Foundation. Ulma and Freymiller, along with other oral surgeons travel to Ensenada, Mexico several times a year where they perform surgery on children with cleft lip and palate.

“Dr. Freymiller has been such an invaluable mentor to me,” Ulma said. “I’ve witnessed patients he’s worked on come back years later to introduce them to their families and thank him for what he’s done for them. He is an example of who I want to become.”

In summer 2015, Ulma will start a three-year residency in the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery program, and learn to perform complex facial and body reconstruction to help replace congenitally or traumatically missing body parts.

“I wouldn’t be where I am today without the Post-Baccalaureate program,” she said. “People do what they know. For example, if there isn’t a role model for how to get into dental school or the health sciences, then younger minorities won’t even see it as an option. I look at where I’m at in my career and feel incredibly lucky for the people who have been role models to me.”

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments (1)

Fact sheets provide snapshot of adult Californians’ health by race, ethnicity


UCLA report digs deeper into differences among groups within Latino, Asian populations.

The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research has issued a series of easy-to-read fact sheets with health statistics on five major ethnic and racial groups in California — whites, Latinos, blacks, Asians and American Indians/Alaska Natives, as well as more detailed information on Latino and Asian subgroups.

A new visual report also provides infographics on key findings from the profiles, which used data from the 2011–12 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) to explore a range of health topics, from insurance status to fruit-and-vegetable consumption to binge drinking.

The profiles provide a detailed and reliable source of information for policymakers, advocates, researchers, media and others interested in understanding the health of adult Californians, particularly those from previously understudied ethnic and racial minority groups.

Of specific interest are key health statistics for five groups within California’s Latino population (which accounts for 9.5 million of the state’s 27.8 million adults), including separate data for U.S.-born Mexicans and Mexicans born outside of the U.S., and health information on half a dozen Asian groups (3.9 million). Latino ethnic groups covered include Mexican, Salvadoran, Guatemalan, other Central American and South American. Asian groups include Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and South Asian.

Among the findings for California’s estimated 27.8 million adults:

Number of uninsured
Approximately 6.2 million California adults (26.6 percent of the state’s adult population) had no health insurance for all or part of the past year.

Insured through work
Nearly six of 10 Asians in the state had employment-based health insurance, compared with five of 10 Californians overall. Among Asian ethnic groups, the figure ranged from a high of more than 7 of 10 for South Asians to fewer than 4 of 10 for Koreans. For Latinos overall, fewer than 4 of 10 had employment-based insurance was, while Guatemalans had the lowest rate — 2 of 10.

Mexican groups and poverty
More than 70 percent of adult Mexicans born outside the U.S. had household incomes under 200 percent of the federal poverty level (less than $46,100 for a family of four in 2012). For U.S.-born Mexicans, the proportion was much lower, at 44.3 percent.

Walking and health
About one-third of all Californians walked regularly on a weekly basis. Latinos had one of the highest rates, at nearly 35 percent, and Salvadorans were the most frequent walkers, with a 41 percent rate.

Californians and obesity
More than 6.8 million Californians — a full quarter of the adult population — were obese. Less than one in 10 Asians was obese, while nearly four in 10 blacks and American Indians/Alaska Natives were.

Read the full 2011–2012 Racial and Ethnicity Health Profiles.

View UCLA Newsroom article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

NEH awards $100K for health humanities program


UC Riverside medical school, humanities faculty collaborate to improve doctor-patient communication.

"Untitled" by Kaza Faust, UC Riverside Ph.D. student in archaeology

Every patient has a story to tell about their illness, their fears and why a prescription for treatment may be difficult to follow. How doctors and patients understand and communicate those stories can be life-altering in making accurate diagnoses, adhering to treatment or accepting an unwelcome prognosis.

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded UC Riverside $100,000 to develop a health humanities program focused on the role of stories in medicine and healing. The two-year, interdisciplinary grant will fund a collaboration of humanities scholars and School of Medicine faculty in an effort to identify how narrative can best be integrated into training medical students.

“Narrative medicine plays a role in creating empathy in doctor-patient encounters,” said Juliet McMullin, associate professor of anthropology and principal investigator of the research project. “If we’re trying to create physicians who are knowledgeable about the community, they need to have conversations with patients that get to the core of their needs.”

The grant is part of the NEH’s Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). HSIs are nonprofit, degree-granting institutions where at least 25 percent of full-time undergraduate students are Hispanic. The U.S. Department of Education named UCR an HSI in 2008, the first in the UC system to receive the honor.

“Latinos are a steadily evolving population in the U.S., and it is therefore crucial to foster a sense of cultural fluency among medical professionals and researchers,” said Tiffany Ana López, holder of the Tomás Rivera Endowed Chair, professor of theater and a co-principal investigator on the project. “The humanities play a crucial role in developing creative and agile approaches to communication that extends to health care, program development and problem solving generally.”

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC medical centers named health care equality leaders


LGBT survey honors four UCs.

The nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights organization has named four University of California medical centers as “Leaders in Healthcare Equality.” UC Davis, UCLA, UC San Diego and UC San Francisco medical centers earned top marks for their commitment to equitable, inclusive care for LGBT patients and their families, who can face challenges in accessing adequate health care.

UCSF Medical Center became the only institution in the United States to have received a perfect score on the national Healthcare Equality Index for six consecutive years.

The Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s 2013 Healthcare Equality Index designated 464 health care facilities as leaders for meeting key criteria for equitable care, including non-discrimination policies for LGBT patients, non-discrimination policies for employees, a guarantee of equal visitation for same-sex partners and parents, and training for staff in LGBT patient-centered care.

Related links:

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC Davis Health System has new chief diversity officer


David Acosta named associate vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion.

David Acosta, UC Davis

David A. Acosta, previously chief diversity officer at the University of Washington School of Medicine, has been named associate vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion at UC Davis Health System, effective July 8.

In his role as associate vice chancellor, Acosta will lead diversity activities across all health system operations, including the UC Davis School of Medicine, the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, UC Davis Medical Center and the physician practice group.

“I am delighted that David Acosta has agreed to lead our diversity and inclusion efforts,” said Thomas Nesbitt, UC Davis interim vice chancellor for human health sciences and dean of the medical school.  “With his wealth of experience, Dr. Acosta is well positioned to advance the diversity of our student body, faculty and staff – an essential undertaking to ensure that our institution provides the highest quality education and care and reflects the communities we serve.”

Acosta is a recognized leader in managing and directing diversity and inclusion programs. At the University of Washington’s medical school, he developed several key programs aimed at increasing the diversity of physicians and patient care.  These included:

  • A rural health fellowship program for Tacoma Family Medicine, an affiliated family medicine residency program at the university’s School of Medicine.
  • A National Institutes of Health-funded Center for Cultural Proficiency in Medical Education at Washington, which received a Washington State Association of Multicultural Education award.
  • A Hispanic Health Pathway certification program for medical students interested in working with Hispanic communities.

As the inaugural chief diversity officer at UW’s School of Medicine, Acosta co-authored the diversity strategic plan and founded the Center for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

“Diversity and inclusion should be the foundations for our interactions with each other, our patients and our communities, as well as for our research and education programs,” said Acosta. “I am proud to be part of UC Davis Health System, which is clearly committed to these fundamental principles. As associate vice chancellor, I will continue to nurture an institutional climate that values inclusion, equity, cultural humility and lifelong reflection.

Acosta was first associated with UC Davis in the early 1980s when he served as clinical preceptor for the school’s medical and family nurse practitioner students at Lassen Family Practice in Susanville.

Acosta earned his medical degree from UC Irvine and his undergraduate degree in biology from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He completed his residency training at Community Hospital of Sonoma County and a faculty development fellowship in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington.

He is a member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the National Alliance for Hispanic Health and the National Association for Rural Medical Educators, among others. He serves on several committees at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), including one focused on holistic review of medical school applicants and another, the AAMC Group on Diversity and Inclusion, where he serves as national chair.

As associate vice chancellor, Acosta will receive an annual base salary of $240,000. Additional compensation information is available upon request.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCSF names new diversity program manager, LGBT specialist


Larry Lariosa appointed to position.

Larry Lariosa, UC San Francisco

Larry D. Lariosa, M.A., a licensed marriage and family therapist, has been named diversity program manager and LGBT specialist at UC San Francisco’s Office of Diversity and Outreach.

The announcement of his appointment coincides with today’s historic Supreme Court rulings in two cases that bolster same-sex marriage and rights of LGBT families. A California native, Lariosa has dedicated his professional and personal life to the issues of cultural diversity and social justice over the past two decades.

Currently, he is serving as a clinical social worker at the UCSF Student Health & Counseling. In that role, he developed a variety of outreach programs addressing the unique needs of LGBT students and other marginalized groups, including students of color and international students.

In his new position, Lariosa will report to Renee Chapman Navarro, M.D., Pharm.D., vice chancellor of diversity and outreach, who was the first to be named to that new leadership role in December 2010.

“We are delighted to have Larry join the Office of Diversity and Outreach,” Navarro said. “His expertise and experience in working with diverse populations makes him an ideal fit for this critical position at UCSF. I look forward to Larry working with the campus and medical center to continue and strengthen the great work that has put UCSF on the map for raising awareness for critical diversity issues including LGBT health care and equity.”

Lariosa will be responsible for the design, execution and assessment of diversity and outreach programs that advance the strategic goals of the Office of Diversity and Outreach and the campus, UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital.

Lariosa will direct and manage all activities of the UCSF Center for LGBT Health and Equity, a center that is considered a national leader in increasing awareness of the LGBT community and addressing issues of equality and inclusion.

Read more

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Director named for center devoted to boost women’s numbers in academia


UC Davis nursing school professor to lead CAMPOS.

Mary Lou de Leon Siantz, UC Davis

Betty Irene School of Nursing professor Mary Lou de Leon Siantz was recently appointed by UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi as director for the new Center for the Advancement of Multicultural Perspectives on Science (CAMPOS). The center is part of a new effort, led by Katehi, to increase the participation of women, especially Latinas, in academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers.

Established by a grant of $3.725 million over five years from the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE program, CAMPOS is a research center aimed at attracting women and Latina STEM scholars to UC Davis by providing an accessible and inclusive community of research collaborators and mentors throughout their careers.

CAMPOS is planned to be both a physical location for networking and exchanging ideas and a faculty-hiring initiative to increase diversity in key STEM fields. In making up to 16 new faculty hires, CAMPOS aims to build coalitions of STEM faculty who want to apply their research to serve underrepresented communities.

“I am honored to not only be representing the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing in the chancellor’s initiative, but also for the recognition of the science behind the nursing profession and the critical role of Latina women in science for the 21st century,” Siantz said.

Read more

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off