TAG: "Awards & honors"

UC San Diego pharmacist honored for his leadership


Charles Daniels receives John Webb Lecture Award.

Charles Daniels, UC San Diego

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) has named Charles E. Daniels, Ph.D., FASHP, as the recipient of the 2014 John W. Webb Lecture Award. The Webb Award honors health-system pharmacy practitioners or educators who stand apart because of their extraordinary dedication to fostering excellence in pharmacy management and leadership.

“This prestigious award reflects Dr. Daniels international recognition as a leader in expanding pharmacy practices and academic development in health systems to improve patient care,” said James H. McKerrow, M.D., Ph.D., dean of the UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  “Throughout his career, Dr. Daniels has focused on solving issues that regularly confront health system pharmacists, including medication safety, cost-effective use of medications, and increased efficiency of health-system operations.”

Daniels is pharmacist-in-chief for UC San Diego Health System and professor of clinical pharmacy and associate dean at UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Daniels serves as system-wide pharmacy officer for the university’s hospitals and clinics. His leadership has cultivated an understanding among health system executives and health care providers of the importance of including pharmacists in key leadership and decision-making positions. He also has served as a champion for postgraduate education and training in order to best prepare pharmacists for practice.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC Davis Children’s Hospital receives Excellence in Life Support Award


Award recognizes exceptional commitment to evidence-based processes, patient care.

UC Davis Children’s Hospital has received the Excellence in Life Support Award from the international Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) for its Extracorporeal Life Support Program. The program provides lifesaving support for failing organ systems in infants, children and, in some cases, adults.

The Excellence in Life Support Award recognizes centers worldwide that demonstrate an exceptional commitment to evidence-based processes and quality measures, staff training and continuing education, patient satisfaction and ongoing clinical care. UC Davis Children’s Hospital also received this award in 2012.

The ELSO Award signifies to patients and families a commitment to exceptional patient care. It also demonstrates to the health care community an assurance of high-quality standards, specialized equipment and supplies, defined patient protocols and advanced education of all staff members.

Extracorporeal life support (ECLS), also known as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or ECMO, is one of the most advanced forms of life support available to patients experiencing acute failure of the cardiac and respiratory systems. The ECLS machine does the work of the heart and lungs, artificially oxygenating the blood and returning it to the body, allowing the patient’s heart and lungs to rest and heal.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCSF nursing professor honored by American Heart Association


Barbara Drew named a 2014 Distinguished Scientist.

Barbara Drew, UC San Francisco

The American Heart Association has just selected Barbara Drew, R.N., Ph.D., to be a 2014 Distinguished Scientist. Drew, professor of physiological nursing and founder of the ECG Monitoring Research Lab in the UCSF School of Nursing, will receive the award at the Annual Scientific Sessions of the AHA in Chicago in November.

Of the six scientists selected this year, Drew is the only nurse and the only woman. In fact, this is the first time in the history of AHA that a nurse scientist has been selected as a Distinguished Scientist. The award is recognition of the extensive contributions Drew has made in the care of patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

Drew has taught clinical electrocardiography to medical students, residents, and graduate nursing students for 32 years. She also founded the ECG Monitoring Research Lab in the School of Nursing and mentored numerous graduate students pursuing studies in the field of electrocardiology.

The primary goal of Drew’s research is to improve cardiac monitoring techniques and clinical practices in hospital and pre-hospital settings for more accurate diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia, and drug-induced long QT syndrome. Drew’s research has shaped the development of commercial cardiac monitors, including the introduction of multilead ECG monitoring, ST-segment and QT interval monitoring, and strategies to reduce clinical alarm fatigue.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Joint Commission certifies UC Irvine hip, knee replacement programs


Gold Seal of Approval denotes commitment to highest quality patient care.

UC Irvine Health has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for its hip and knee joint replacement programs by demonstrating compliance with the organization’s national standards for health care quality and safety in disease-specific care.

UC Irvine Health underwent a rigorous on-site review in May. A Joint Commission expert evaluated the programs for compliance with standards of care specific to the needs of patients and families, including infection prevention and control, leadership and medication management.

The commitment to these standards is reflected in the UC Irvine Health Joint Replacement Surgical Home. Developed at UC Irvine Medical Center, this model coordinates the roles of orthopaedic surgeons, anesthesiologists and nursing staff before, during and after surgery to ensure that patients receive the most efficient and comprehensive care available. The surgical home model has measurable standards for perioperative care and ensures that potential improvements are identified and incorporated into the program.

“The ability to achieve such high level of care and patient satisfaction is only possible due to the dedication and hard work put in daily by our joint replacement surgical home team,” said Ran Schwarzkopf, M.D., assistant clinical professor, UC Irvine Health Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and head of the hip and knee surgery service. “It is this team work that allows us to be a center of excellence in total hip and knee replacement surgery.”

The Joint Commission’s Disease-Specific Care Certification Program, launched in 2002, is designed to evaluate clinical programs across the continuum of care. Certification requirements address three core areas: compliance with consensus-based national standards; effective use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to manage and optimize care; and an organized approach to performance measurement and improvement activities.

“In achieving Joint Commission certification, UC Irvine Health has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its patients undergoing knee or hip joint replacement,” says Jean Range, M.S., R.N., C.P.H.Q. executive director, Disease-Specific Care Certification, The Joint Commission. “Certification is a voluntary process and I commend UC Irvine Health for successfully undertaking this challenge to elevate its standard of care and instill confidence in the community it serves.”

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCLA Medical Group earns highest rating in industry quality survey


Elite ranking in CAPG Standards of Excellence survey.

UCLA Medical Group has received a four-star “elite” ranking, the highest possible designation, in the eighth annual CAPG Standards of Excellence survey.

The survey is a voluntary, critical self-assessment for CAPG’s 180 medical group members in California and 29 other states. It measures how well-equipped health care systems are to deliver a better patient experience, better population health and better overall affordability — the “triple aim“ outlined by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

UCLA Medical Group is one of 45 physician organizations to achieve the coveted “elite” status in the survey, which for the second consecutive year was conducted by CAPG in collaboration with the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

The results of the survey were released at CAPG’s national conference of health care experts, held from June 5 to 8 in Los Angeles.

“We are constantly challenging ourselves to do more for our patients while controlling costs,” said Dr. Samuel A. Skootsky, chief medical officer of the UCLA Faculty Practice and Medical Group. “Participation in the Standards of Excellence survey provides an opportunity to evaluate and improve on our processes. It is gratifying to see the success of these efforts acknowledged through our four-star rating.”

“What started eight years ago has now become an industry standard in measuring the tools required for sophisticated health care systems to deliver accountable and value-based care in the physician practice setting,” said Donald Crane, president and CEO of CAPG. “The industry validation continues to solidify the Standards of Excellence’s value in helping physician practices improve the coordination of patient care and thrive in a health care marketplace undergoing immense transition.”

This year, 86 medical groups that cover 11.1 million members through HMO models of care and an estimated 5 million through PPO coverage or government programs participated in the CAPG assessment. They were evaluated in six key domains:

Care management practices
Providing timely, safe, effective, efficient care and constantly improving care.

Health information technology 
The technical tools required to support care management practices, as well as individual care coordination, population awareness, performance measurement and feedback.

Accountability and transparency
Responding to the demands of the people the organization serves.

Patient-centered care
The ability to promote a service-oriented culture.

Group support of advanced primary care
Giving the “patient-centered medical home” a systemwide functionality and revitalizing the discipline of primary care.

Administrative and financial capability
How physician groups respond to the financial challenges of health care reform.

Survey results and additional information can be found at www.capg.org/index.aspx?page=84.

CAPG represents more than 180 multispecialty medical groups and independent practice associations in California and 29 other states, serving as a voice for physician organizations that provide comprehensive health care through coordinated and accountable physician group practices.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC Davis Medical Center receives echocardiography accreditation


Accreditation a ‘seal of approval’ for patients.

UC Davis Medical Center has been granted a three-year term of accreditation in echocardiography in three areas by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC).

The three areas for which the IAC granted accreditation are adult stress, adult transesophageal and adult transthoracic.

Accreditation by the IAC signifies that the medical center has undergone a thorough review of its operational and technical components by a panel of experts. The IAC grants accreditation only to those facilities that are found to be providing quality patient care, in compliance with national standards through a comprehensive application process including detailed case study review.

IAC accreditation is a “seal of approval” that patients can rely on as an indication that the facility has been carefully critiqued on all aspects of its operations considered relevant by medical experts in the field of echocardiography. When scheduled for an echocardiography procedure, patients are encouraged to ask about the accreditation status of the facility where their examination will be performed, and can learn more by visiting www.intersocietal.org/echo/main/patients.htm.

IAC accreditation is widely respected within the medical community, as illustrated by the support of the national medical societies related to echocardiography, which include physicians and sonographers. Echocardiography accreditation is required in some states and regions by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and by some private insurers. However, patients should remain vigilant in making sure that their echocardiography procedures are performed within accredited facilities, because for many facilities accreditation remains a voluntary process.

Cardiovascular diseases are the No. 1 cause of death in the United States. On average, one American dies every 39 seconds of cardiovascular disease — disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The American Heart Association estimates that the direct and indirect cost for cardiovascular disease in the U.S. for 2010 was $503.2 billion.

Early detection of life threatening heart disorders and other diseases is possible through the use of echocardiography procedures performed within hospitals, outpatient centers and physicians’ offices. While these tests are helpful, there are many facets that contribute to an accurate diagnosis based on echocardiography testing. The skill of the echocardiography sonographer performing the examination, the type of equipment used, the background and knowledge of the interpreting physician and quality assurance measures are each critical to quality patient testing.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC children’s hospitals rank among best in U.S.


U.S. News highlights excellence in pediatric care.

The University of California’s three children’s hospitals – Davis, Los Angeles and San Francisco – all rank among the nation’s top pediatric hospitals, according to the new 2014-15 Best Children’s Hospitals survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

This year’s report, published today (June 10), can be viewed online at www.usnews.com/childrenshospitals. The rankings highlight U.S. News’ top 50 pediatric facilities in 10 specialties.

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital was recognized for excellence in all 10 specialties, Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA in eight and UC Davis Children’s Hospital in four. In addition, UC’s two other medical center campuses are affiliated with ranked children’s hospitals – UC Irvine is affiliated with Children’s Hospital of Orange County (ranked in seven specialties) and UC San Diego is affiliated with Rady Children’s Hospital (ranked in all 10 specialties).

The rankings for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital include diabetes and endocrinology (10), urology (12), nephrology (18), gastroenterology and gastrointestinal surgery (21), neurology and neurosurgery (21), cardiology and heart surgery (23), cancer (25), neonatology (26), orthopedics (28), and pulmonology (45).

The rankings for Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA include nephrology (10), neonatology (13), gastroenterology and gastrointestinal surgery (15), cardiology and heart surgery (25), orthopedics (27), neurology and neurosurgery (36), cancer (38), and diabetes and endocrinology (44).

Together with Shriners Hospital for Children – Northern California, its longstanding partner in caring for children with burns, spinal cord injuries, urological issues and orthopedic disorders, UC Davis Children’s Hospital ranked No. 22 in orthopedics and No. 47 in urology. UC Davis also ranked No. 23 in nephrology and No. 28 in neonatology.

Related links:

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Medical center receives Zero Hero Award for avoidance of early deliveries


UC Davis honored by Patient Safety First.

UC Davis Medical Center has received the Zero Hero Award from Patient Safety First for having no early elective baby deliveries for 15 consecutive months.

Mitchell Creinin, chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, was presented with the award at a recent meeting of the Quality and Safety Committee. The department has not had an early elective delivery for 30 consecutive months.

“Accomplishing this feat is a tribute to the combined efforts of physicians and nurses who provide obstetric care at the medical center,” said Creinin.

The trophy plaque will be displayed soon in the University Birthing Suites. The award originally was presented at the Annual Patient Safety First meeting last November in San Francisco.

Patient Safety First was launched in 2010 to improve quality of care, reduce health care costs and save lives by improving patient safety and perinatal care in California. The project is a partnership among the National Health Foundation, California’s Regional Hospital Associations, Anthem Blue Cross and more than 180 hospitals across the state.

Read more

For more health news, visit UC Health, subscribe by email or follow us on Flipboard.

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC Irvine medical students receive AMA leadership award


Recipients include Asghar Haider and Raja Narayan.

Two students at the UC Irvine School of Medicine are among 15 recipients of the American Medical Association Foundation’s 2014 Leadership Award.

Asghar Haider, an M.D./M.B.A. student, and Raja Narayan, an M.D./M.P.H. student, were honored by the AMA Foundation at its annual Excellence in Medicine Awards celebration on June 6 in Chicago. The national award recognizes medical students, residents/fellows and early career physicians for achievements in community service, medical education and public health.

Award recipients will receive special training to develop their skills as future leaders in community affairs and organized medicine.

“Mr. Haider and Mr. Narayan exemplify UC Irvine’s commitment to its mission of Discover.Teach.Heal,” said Ralph V. Clayman, M.D., dean of the UC Irvine School of Medicine and professor, department of urology. “Their respective exemplary work in community outreach and educational innovation provide benefits that go well beyond the borders of our university.  I am proud of their endeavors to date and look forward to their future accomplishments.”

Asghar “Abbas” Haider is a fourth-year student in the combined M.D./M.B.A. curriculum. Haider is passionate about community outreach. As an immigrant and first-generation college student, he recognizes the need for mentors for teens in his community. In 2007, Haider co-founded the Peer Advancement Community for Teens, an organization that mentors and tutors underserved students in the Los Angeles area. He is working towards a dual M.D./M.B.A. degree in order to better understand the changing healthcare landscape and to advocate for his future patients.

His aspiration is to become a leader in academic ophthalmology.

Raja Narayan will complete his final year of medical school at UC Irvine and is pursuing a master of public health degree in applied biostatistics and epidemiology.

He has been involved in deploying technology to advance medical education and patient care, which has led him to be named a Patron Fund Diplomat at TEDMED, a New England Journal of Medicine Gold Scholar and co-president of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. As an undergraduate at Yale, Narayan was a member of the Institutional Review Board, a senior clinical team member of the student-run HAVEN free clinic, lead editor for the Yale Journal of Health Policy Law and Ethics, winner of the Yale Global Health Case Competition, and captain of the Movember initiative that raised money to support research on men’s health. Narayan plans applies to residency in general surgery.

The Excellence in Medicine Award program is presented in association with Eli Lilly & Co., Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals Inc., PhRMA, and Pfizer Inc. The Leadership Award was first bestowed in 2003.

View original article

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UC hospitals honored for environmental achievements


Practice Greenhealth recognizes UCLA, UCSF medical centers.

Both Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, have been honored with 2014 Partner for Change awards by Practice Greenhealth, a nonprofit organization that works with the health care community to increase efficiencies and environmental stewardship while improving patient safety and care through the use of best practices and new tools and knowledge.

“The UCLA Health System has worked tirelessly to protect its patients, staff and environment through smart goal-setting and careful monitoring,” said Gary Cohen, president of Practice Greenhealth. “As a system, they are truly demonstrating leadership for the future of health care.”

The award is one of the organization’s Environmental Excellence Awards, given each year to honor outstanding environmental achievements in the health care sector. This is the fourth consecutive year that both UCLA hospitals have received the award. UCSF Medical Center / UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital received the Greenhealth Emerald Award. UCSF also received the Climate award for reporting and setting emission goals at the medical center and the Green Building award for the sustainable design of the new hospitals opening next year at Mission Bay.

The Partner for Change award recognizes those facilities that have continuously improved and expanded their programs aimed at eliminating mercury, reducing waste, lowering the toxicity of waste and recycling. At a minimum, facilities applying for the honor must have reduced regulated medical waste, must be recycling 15 percent of their total waste, must be well along the path toward mercury elimination, and must have developed other successful pollution-prevention programs in a number of areas.

“We take pride in our sustainability efforts to lessen our impact on the environment,” said Dr. David Feinberg, president of the UCLA Health System and CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. “Our UCLA Health System hospitals are committed to improving the health of our patients, staff and community as a whole through good stewardship of our precious resources.”

This year, both hospitals were also presented with the Making Medicine Mercury-Free Award, which recognizes facilities where proven policies have been put in place to eliminate one of the most hazardous chemicals and prevent it from reentering the sites. Award criteria include mercury-free management and purchasing policies and staff education.

“We can’t properly heal patients when there are pollutants and chemicals present in the health care setting,” said Paul Watkins, chief administrative officer of UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, and chair of the UCLA Health System’s sustainability committee. “Eliminating mercury in our daily work environment protects both our patients and staff.”

The Practice Greenhealth Environmental Excellence Awards were presented June 5 in Cleveland at the CleanMed Conference and Exhibition, the premier national environmental conference for leaders in health care sustainability.

For more on Practice Greenhealth, visit www.practicegreenhealth.org.

Related links:

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

UCSF’s Science Education Partnership leads award-winning STEM initiative


US2020 City Competition honors San Francisco’s STEM efforts.

Chelsea Stewart, a student at Raoul Wallenberg Traditional High School in San Francisco and an intern in the UCSF Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP) program, discusses her poster presentation with SEP academic coordinator Kishore Hari in 2012.

San Francisco is one of seven winners of a national competition to encourage mentoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), with an initiative to be led by UC San Francisco’s Science & Health Education Partnership.

The US2020 City Competition challenged cities to develop innovative models for dramatically increasing the number of STEM professionals mentoring and teaching students through hands-on projects.  US2020 is specifically focused on increasing STEM opportunities and excitement for girls, underrepresented minorities and children from low-income families.  Public/private coalitions from 52 cities across the nation applied, engaging nearly 600 companies and civic organizations.

The winners, announced last week at the White House Science Fair, will share $1 million in financial, consulting and staff support over the next year to launch their plans.

“I am excited by this opportunity to increase STEM mentors who are working with our students and getting them ready for the jobs of the 21st century,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee.

In San Francisco, eight of the 11 occupations with the largest projected growth before 2020 are in STEM fields. Yet most students in San Francisco public schools have never met a STEM professional.

San Francisco’s US2020 award-winning program, to be called “SF US2020,” will be led by UCSF’s Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP) in collaboration with the San Francisco Mayor’s Office, San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), Salesforce and Techbridge.

“We are incredibly proud that our own SEP program is the leader of this important collaboration. With over 25 years of successful experience in supporting STEM education in San Francisco, I’m certain our SEP team will set the bar high for the other cities who share the US2020 award,” said Elizabeth Watkins, Ph.D., dean of the Graduate Division and vice chancellor for student academic affairs at UCSF.

In San Francisco, Salesforce.com Foundation is the founding sponsor of US2020. National US2020 founding partners are Cisco, Cognizant, Raytheon, SanDisk and Tata Consultancy Services, recently joined by Chevron, with additional support coming from Discovery Communications, Fidelity Investments, HP, the Carnegie Corp. of New York and the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation.

Initiated in 1987 by UCSF professor Bruce Alberts, SEP is recognized nationally and internationally as a model organization that supports quality science education for K-12 students through partnerships between scientists and teachers. Each year, UCSF SEP supports 300 volunteers working with San Francisco Unified School District teachers and students, contributing more than 10,000 hours. UCSF SEP also leads the Bay Area Science Festival, an annual 10-day celebration of STEM reaching 70,000 people.

The other winning cities are Allentown, Pa.; Chicago.; Indianapolis; Philadelphia; Research Triangle Park, N.C.; amd Wichita, Kan.

View original article

 

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off

Peter Walter receives Shaw Prize


UCSF professor wins Asia’s top scientific honor.

Peter Walter, UC San Francisco

A UC San Francisco professor of biochemistry and biophysics has received Asia’s highest scientific honor, the 2014 Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine, for his groundbreaking discovery of a system that makes “life and death decisions” for the cell.

Peter Walter, Ph.D., who is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, shares the prize with Kazutoshi Mori, Ph.D., a professor of biophysics at Kyoto University in Japan. They were jointly named winners of the award today (May 27) in an announcement by the Shaw Prize Foundation, in Hong Kong.

The award acknowledges the scientists’ discovery of the so-called “unfolded protein response” of the cell’s endoplasmic reticulum, and its role in ensuring that proteins are properly constructed, especially when the cell’s quality control system is overwhelmed.

Because of their work, scientists now understand that when these basic systems malfunction, serious diseases can result, including cancer, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as the more arcane eye disease retinitis pigmentosa.

“Peter Walter has received widespread acclaim for his discoveries of how the cell ensures that its fundamental building blocks are properly constructed and the role protein malformations play in disease,” said UCSF interim Chancellor Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S. “His discovery with professor Mori has altered the field of biochemistry and is a perfect example of the importance of basic research today, its impact on health and importance for society.”

Walter, 59, joins four previous Shaw laureates from UCSF: Herbert Boyer (2004), Yuet-Wai Kan (2004), Shinya Yamanaka (2008) and David Julius (2010).

The Shaw Prize, launched in November 2002 and first awarded in 2004, consists of three annual prizes, which are presented to scientists in the fields of astronomy, life science and medicine, and mathematical sciences. Each prize carries a monetary award of $1 million.

The 2014 Shaw laureates will receive their awards in Hong Kong at the 11th annual ceremony on Wednesday, Sept. 24.

Established through the support and guidance of Hong Kong entrepreneur Run Run Shaw, the Shaw Prize is an international award managed and administered by The Shaw Prize Foundation, in Hong Kong. Shaw also founded The Shaw Foundation Hong Kong and The Sir Run Run Shaw Charitable Trust, both dedicated to the promotion of education, scientific and technological research, medical and welfare services, and culture and the arts.

Read more

CATEGORY: NewsComments Off