TAG: "Administration"

Regents confirm San Hawgood as UCSF chancellor


He is 10th chancellor of the health sciences campus.

UC President Janet Napolitano shakes the hand of the newly confirmed UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood at a press briefing after the Board of Regents approved his appointment on July 17. (Photo by Cindy Chew)

The University of California Board of Regents today (July 17) approved Sam Hawgood as the 10th chancellor of UC San Francisco, where he has served as dean of the UCSF School of Medicine and interim chancellor.

Hawgood, 61, was selected by President Janet Napolitano as the next chancellor after he rose to the top of a strong field of candidates. A search committee composed of regents, faculty, alumni, staff and students reviewed more than 375 candidates and interviewed seven finalists for the position.

“Dr. Hawgood’s list of accomplishments in the lab, in the clinic and in the administrative suite is long and illustrious,” said Regents Chairman Bruce D. Varner.

“Throughout a truly exhaustive selection process, Dr. Hawgood demonstrated the intellectual inquisitiveness, leadership acumen and powerful vision we seek in our chancellors,” Napolitano said. “When an exhaustive search lands on a candidate from within the institution, it is a sign that the enterprise is fundamentally robust. We have been fortunate to have Sam as a member of the UC family for more than 30 years.”

Hawgood had served as interim chancellor since Susan Desmond-Hellmann stepped down April 1, 2014, to become chief executive officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

UCSF, with an annual budget of $4.2 billion, includes nationally top-ranked graduate schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing and pharmacy, as well as affiliated hospitals, a pre-eminent biomedical research enterprise and a graduate division with nationally renowned programs in basic, biomedical, translational and population sciences.

“I understand and deeply respect the core values of UCSF – and both the principle and practice of shared governance with the faculty,” Hawgood told the regents after they approved his appointment.

“But I know that, while we should remain connected to our past and preserve our values,” he said, “our times call for a rigorous look at the reality of the world today and a willingness to move forward in new directions. I embrace the opportunity to work closely with the faculty as we embark, together, on this journey.”

The Board of Regents approved a state-funded base salary of $500,000, plus $250,000 to be funded through an endowed chair, The Arthur Rock and Toni Rembe Distinguished Professorship, created specifically for the chancellor position by the UCSF Foundation, using no state funds.  His total cash compensation ranks 34th among chancellors and presidents of the 62 public research universities that are part of the Association of American Universities.

Consistent with past practice, Hawgood will receive an annual auto allowance of $8,916, and the university will provide him with the existing UCSF Chancellor’s home, which is suitable for duties such as fundraising. The residence is maintained with non-state funds.

With 22,800 faculty and staff, UCSF is the second-largest employer in San Francisco, and generates more than 17,000 additional jobs locally through its construction, its expenditures and purchases by employees, students and visitors.

Hawgood has served as dean of the UCSF School of Medicine and as vice chancellor for medical affairs since September 2009, after assuming the role of interim dean in December 2007. He previously had chaired the Department of Pediatrics, having first served in an interim role. He also served as associate director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute.

The School of Medicine has an operating budget of more than $1.9 billion, 7,400 faculty and staff, and about 3,655 medical and graduate students, residents, fellows and postdoctoral scholars. The school’s clinical faculty is known widely for world-class medical care through its practice in the top-ranked UCSF Medical Center, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, San Francisco (newly affiliated with Children’s Hospital Oakland, now known as UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland), Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, San Francisco General Hospital & Trauma Center, and the San Francisco Veterans’ Administration Medical Center.

Under Hawgood’s leadership, the school became the top medical school in the nation in research funding from the National Institutes of Health ($439.6 million in 2013), with many of its departments also leading the nation in their fields. It also became the only medical school in the nation to rank in the top five in both research and primary-care education, in the U.S. News & World Report’s annual assessment of graduate schools.

Numerous organizations and publications have recognized Hawgood’s scientific contributions. He is past president of the Society for Pediatric Research and a member of the American Association of Physicians, and in 2010 was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), which provides authoritative advice to Congress, other decision makers and the public as part of the National Academy of Sciences. Membership in the IOM is one of the highest honors for individuals at the top of their fields.

“Curiosity-driven basic science is and will remain the jewel in the UCSF crown,” Hawgood said, “but two realities must be faced. The first is funding.  Federal funding in basic research and development is flat with declining purchasing power. I am committed to doing everything possible to strengthen basic research at UCSF.

“The second is the merging of technologic and biologic sciences in ways unimagined only a few years ago. Both these trends in the research sector suggest innovative public-public and public-private partnerships are needed as well as new routes to commercialization.”

UCSF research has led to revolutions in health and therapeutics, from the birth of the field of biotechnology and first therapies for HIV/AIDS to clinical innovations such as fetal surgery and stem cell therapies offering the promise of transforming lives worldwide. The faculty includes five Nobel laureates, who have made seminal contributions to advance the understanding of cancer, neurogenerative diseases, aging and stem cell research.

Hawgood has been active for decades in clinical medicine. He served as division chief of the Division of Neonatology, then as chair of Pediatrics and physician-in-chief of the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital before becoming dean. He has been serving as president of the UCSF Medical Group, the faculty association that represents more than 1,800 UCSF physicians.

He joined UCSF as a research fellow in 1982, working with distinguished scientists John A. Clements, M.D., and William H. Tooley, M.D., both pioneers in the discovery and therapeutic uses of pulmonary surfactant, the key lipoprotein that lines healthy lungs and enables them to expand with each breath. He has maintained his own laboratory since 1984. His research has gained him an international reputation in neonatology research.

A native of Australia, Hawgood entered medical school at the age of 17, and was graduated with First Class Honors from the University of Queensland in Brisbane with a degree in medicine and surgery (M.B.B.S.).

Hawgood and his wife, Jane, a social worker who recently retired after focusing on palliative care for adults, met at the University of Queensland. They have two grown sons.

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UC Health appoints interim supply chain executive


UC Davis’ Vincent Johnson to lead systemwide supply chain efforts.

Vincent Johnson

The University of California has appointed Vincent Johnson, chief operating officer of UC Davis Medical Center, as interim UC Health systemwide supply chain executive.

In fiscal year 2015, Johnson will be responsible for the leadership and success of the joint UC medical centers’ systemwide procurement strategies and programs, as part of the “Leveraging Scale for Value” project to reduce costs at UC hospitals.

Advancing health care reform will require UC’s medical centers to operate more efficiently. UC medical centers recognize this challenge and have embarked upon an aggressive program to apply the integrated scale of UC to adapt to increasing resource and financial challenges.

UC’s Leveraging Scale for Value project, announced in March, initially will focus on three areas: supply chain, revenue cycle and clinical laboratories. This effort is governed by the UC Health Shared Services Management Council, which consists of the five UC medical center CEOs, three medical school deans, two chancellors, one regent, three external experts and is chaired by UC Health Senior Vice President John Stobo.

Increasing systemwide leverage in supply chain is among the first efforts launched by the council to rapidly reduce operating expenses through aggressive procurement savings. Focusing initially on non-medical supplies, purchased services and capital procurement, UC plans to find savings through increasingly coordinated procurement. Medical supply savings also will be sought out with appropriate clinical support.

Johnson will lead this effort and report directly to the council. He will be supported by UC San Francisco Medical Center Chief Operating Officer and Supply Chain Vice Chair Ken Jones and the UC medical centers’ supply chain leadership team. Their savings target for fiscal year 2015 will be in excess of $50 million.

To accomplish these savings, Johnson and his teams will focus on working directly with UC’s supply and service vendors to reduce expenses through systemwide procurement leverage, infrastructure development and operating efficiencies.

Future supply chain improvement efforts will advance UC’s competitiveness through transformative programs built upon these initial systemwide savings efforts.

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UCSF Medical Center, John Muir Health to collaborate


Affiliation would be cornerstone of regional network offering high-quality, affordable care.

UCSF Medical Center and John Muir Health have signed a letter of intent to develop a company that will serve as the cornerstone of a Bay Area health care network intended to provide patients with high-quality care and an exceptional experience at an affordable price. A final agreement is expected by the end of 2014.

Under the proposed agreement both organizations would remain independent, but a new company would be created that is equally owned and operated by both organizations. The new company would serve as a funding vehicle for future joint initiatives and a shared services organization to support programs and initiatives focused on better health care, at lower costs, for Bay Area patients.

The first of these joint initiatives is investment in a collaborative effort with other health care providers to form a regional health care network, or “accountable care organization” (ACO). Establishing a Bay Area-wide ACO will provide patients from throughout the Bay Area and Northern California with a competitively priced option to access, close to where they live or work, many of the Bay Area’s most trusted and respected hospitals, health systems and physician organizations.

Both John Muir Health and UCSF Medical Center have experience in successful ACOs that have demonstrated lower health care costs and improved health care quality. The goal of an ACO is to provide the right care at the right time and in the most appropriate setting, whether that is the primary care physician’s office, an outpatient center or a hospital, and savings achieved as part of an ACO can be passed along to consumers in the form of lower health care benefit premiums.

“By combining John Muir Health and UCSF’s strengths, we aim to offer patients the highest value system of care available,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. “We look forward to working not just with each other, but with other health organizations throughout Northern California, in order to provide an exceptional health care experience for patients.”

“The jointly owned and operated company brings together two organizations that share a commitment to providing patients with high-quality care at an affordable price,” said Cal Knight, President and CEO of John Muir Health. “We looked at a number of affiliation options that would allow us to grow without compromising our mission, vision and independence. We found the right fit with UCSF and look forward to the development, along with other partners, of a regional ACO that will benefit patients and the communities we serve.”

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UCSF names chair of bioengineering and therapeutic sciences


Tejal Desai’s appointment begins Aug. 1.

Tejal Desai, UC San Francisco

Tejal Desai, Ph.D., has been named the new chair of the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences (BTS), a joint department within the UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy and School of Medicine. Her appointment is effective Aug. 1.

“I am delighted Tejal will chair the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences,” said Chancellor Sam Hawgood, M.B.B.S., who is also serving as School of Medicine dean. “She has the vision, energy and experience that will ensure the department continues to thrive.”

“Tejal’s willingness to serve as department chair is characteristic of her collegial approach to science and education,” added School of Pharmacy Dean B. Joseph Guglielmo, Pharm.D. “She is an award-winning bioengineer and an accomplished teacher and administrator who has the deep respect of the faculty.  I’m very pleased Tejal has accepted the chair position.”

Desai replaces Kathy Giacomini, Ph.D., who stepped down to lead the UCSF-Stanford FDA Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (CERSI), a joint venture with Stanford University. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided the funding for CERSI.

“Building upon her spectacular success with the creation of the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences with past co-chair Sarah Nelson, Ph.D., Kathy’s contributions to CERSI will be equally distinguished in the coming years,” Guglielmo said.

Prior to her appointment, Desai was vice chair in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences.

“This is a unique department, not only at UCSF, but also internationally,” Desai said. “We have talented and diverse faculty members who aren’t afraid to take risks and work at the new intersection of pharmacy, medicine, engineering and basic science.  As chair, I hope to further strengthen the department, support and advocate for the faculty, and ensure the department’s continued success so it can be a model worldwide.”

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President Napolitano selects UCSF chancellor


Sam Hawgood’s selection will be voted on July 17 by UC Regents.

Sam Hawgood has been tapped to become UC San Francisco's 10th chancellor. (Photo by Elisabeth Fall)

University of California President Janet Napolitano announced today (July 9) that her choice for the 10th chancellor of UC San Francisco is Sam Hawgood, the UCSF School of Medicine dean who emerged from a national search as the top candidate after leading the campus in an interim role.

Hawgood, 61, a highly accomplished scientist, educator and physician with a strong record of leadership, succeeded Susan Desmond-Hellmann as interim chancellor on April 1, 2014. Since then, he has overseen the $4 billion UCSF enterprise, which, in addition to the renowned medical school, includes nationally top-ranked schools of dentistry, nursing and pharmacy, as well as a graduate division and affiliated hospitals.

The UC Board of Regents will vote on Napolitano’s selection and the terms of the appointment on July 17 in a special session at the conclusion of the regents’ regular bimonthly meeting.

“Sam Hawgood has served UC San Francisco exceedingly well for three decades — as a researcher, physician and leader,” Napolitano said. “As interim chancellor, he has advanced initiatives in both basic and clinical science, as well as precision medicine.

“He has demonstrated,” she said, “that he possesses the mix of vision, curiosity and empathy essential to the dynamic leadership required to move this already stellar UC institution to even greater heights. When a rigorous, far-reaching search lands on a candidate from within, it demonstrates the fundamental strength of the institution.”

As dean of the School of Medicine, Hawgood has led an organization with an operating budget of more than $1.7 billion, nearly 8,000 faculty and staff, and about 3,655 medical and graduate students, residents, fellows and postdoctoral scholars.

Under his leadership, the school became the top medical school in the nation in research funding from the National Institutes of Health ($439.6 million in 2013), with many of its departments also leading the nation in their fields. In that time, the school also became the only medical school in the nation to rank in the top five in both research and primary-care education, in the U.S. News & World Report’s annual assessment of graduate schools.

The school’s clinical faculty is known widely for world-class medical care through its practice in the top-ranked UCSF Medical Center, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital (newly merged with Children’s Hospital Oakland), Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, San Francisco General Hospital & Trauma Center, and the San Francisco Veterans’ Administration Medical Center.

Hawgood has served as dean of the UCSF School of Medicine and as vice chancellor for medical affairs since September 2009, after assuming the role of interim dean in December 2007. He previously had chaired the Department of Pediatrics, having first served in an interim role. He also served as associate director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute.

Numerous organizations and publications have recognized Hawgood’s scientific contributions. He is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Association of Physicians, and in 2010 was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), which provides authoritative advice to Congress, other decision makers and the public as part of the National Academy of Sciences. Membership in the IOM is one of the highest honors for individuals at the top of their fields.

“I am honored, excited and humbled,” Hawgood said, “by the opportunity to lead UC San Francisco to new horizons in basic and clinical research, teaching and patient care, building on a shared vision of this world-class institution’s excellence, history and legacy.

“I look forward to working with all members of the UCSF community — students, faculty and staff, our philanthropic partners and the larger community — as we focus on strengthening every aspect of this great institution,” he said.

Hawgood has been active for decades in clinical medicine. He served as division chief of the Division of Neonatology, then as chair of Pediatrics and physician-in-chief of the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital before becoming dean. He is the president of the UCSF Medical Group, the faculty association that represents more than 1,800 UCSF physicians.

“Dr. Hawgood knows how to engage in shared governance with all segments of the faculty, and he understands every aspect of our central mission that relates to research, education and public service,” said Farid F. Chehab, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and chair of the UCSF Academic Senate. “He has done a terrific job as dean of the School of Medicine, and always looks at the larger picture without overlooking any of the details. I think his leadership as chancellor will take UCSF to new heights and positively impact on faculty, staff and students.”

Hawgood joined UCSF as a research fellow in 1982, working with distinguished scientists John A. Clements, M.D., and William H. Tooley, M.D., both pioneers in the discovery and therapeutic uses of pulmonary surfactant, the key lipoprotein that lines healthy lungs and enables them to expand with each breath. He has maintained his own laboratory since 1984. His research has gained him an international reputation in neonatology research.

“The search to fill the chancellorship was national in scope, and the field of candidates was impressive,” UC Board of Regents Chairman Bruce D. Varner said. “No candidate was more impressive, however, than Dr. Hawgood, who made clear to members of the search committee that his passion for UCSF was matched only by his preparedness to lead it forward. I look forward to taking up Sam’s nomination when the Board of Regents meets.”

A native of Australia, Hawgood entered medical school at the age of 17, and was graduated with First Class Honors from the University of Queensland in Brisbane with a degree in medicine and surgery (MBBS).

Hawgood and his wife, Jane, a social worker who recently retired after focusing on palliative care for adults, met at the University of Queensland. They have two grown sons.

“With his incredible credentials, experience and intimate knowledge of every aspect of the campus, Sam Hawgood is the logical and ideal choice to be the next chancellor of UC San Francisco,” said William E. Oberndorf, chair of the UC San Francisco Foundation Board of Directors.

“He has served the university in many capacities, and he is well known to many of our most important donors,” Oberndorf said. “His leadership qualities and the continuity of service will enable UC San Francisco to move forward without losing a step as we forge new paths in research and clinical care.”

The members of the search advisory committee for the UCSF chancellor included five regents; representatives of UC faculty, including the Academic Senate, the UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Foundation; and staff, students and alumni. Napolitano and Varner were ex officio members.

The search advisory committee was involved in recruiting, screening and conducting interviews with candidates for the position. The committee reviewed more than 375 prospective candidates and conducted in-depth interviews with seven finalists. The search was assisted by the executive search firm Isaacson, Miller.

“Sam Hawgood brings integrity, intellect and vision to UC San Francisco,” said Susan Desmond-Hellmann, the chief executive officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation who served as UC San Francisco chancellor from Aug. 3, 2009, until April 1, 2014. “He is one of the best leaders I ever worked with. The university will be in great hands with Sam leading the way.”

(NOTE TO NEWS MEDIA: Neither President Napolitano nor Dr. Hawgood will comment further until the regents have acted on the proposed appointment.)

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UC Davis names chief of trauma surgery


Joseph Galante selected.

Joseph Galante, UC Davis

Joseph Galante has been named chief of the UC Davis Division of Trauma, Surgical Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery. He previously served as the division’s trauma medical director and interim chief, in addition to serving as vice chair for education and director of the general surgery residency program for the Department of Surgery.

Galante is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. After receiving his medical degree from Temple University, he received his general surgical training and completed his trauma and critical care fellowship at UC Davis, where he received the Outstanding Chief Resident Award. In 2012, he was named by the Sacramento Business Journal as one of its “40 under 40,” an annual recognition of up-and-coming professionals who have made important community contributions. He also received the Department of Surgery Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award in 2013.

In addition to his work at UC Davis, Galante is a member of the U.S. Naval reserves who has served with distinction both in the U.S., Western Pacific and Afghanistan. His research focuses on improving medical treatment in response to disasters and utilizing military medical technology to benefit civilian practice. As a teacher and mentor, he is training health-care providers who treat those in the armed forces. Among his many military honors are the Navy Commendation Medal, three Navy and Marine Corps Achievement medals and the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal.

Galante has served as a team physician to the FBI SWAT team in Sacramento and as a physician member of the disaster medical assistance team in the California region of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

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UC San Diego appoints pharmacy school dean


James McKerrow will become school’s second dean.

James McKerrow

Effective July 1, 2014, James H. McKerrow, M.D., Ph.D., will become the second dean of the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego. McKerrow will join UC San Diego from UC San Francisco, where he served as professor of pathology and director of the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases.

An expert in the area of neglected tropical diseases, McKerrow brings a wealth of experience in natural product research and drug discovery and development. His keen interest in these areas will help bring together cross-disciplinary researchers at UC San Diego and in the community – in global health, infectious diseases, biology and chemistry and drug development programs – all of which are of strategic importance to the health sciences and the UC San Diego campus.

McKerrow is an alumnus of UC San Diego, where he earned his Ph.D. in biology in 1973, focusing on peptide chemistry and molecular genetics. He then went on to receive his M.D. from SUNY, Stony Brook with an internship in internal medicine. He completed his residency in pathology at UCSF, where he was chief resident from 1979 to 1980. From 1980 to 1981, he continued at UCSF as a postdoctoral fellow and clinical instructor, moving on to become an assistant (1981-87), associate (1987-93) and full professor (1993-present) in the Department of Pathology. From 2003 to 2012, he also served as vice chair for research and education in the Department of Pathology.

He is an active teacher and mentor in graduate and postdoctoral programs, lectures to medical and health profession students and has hosted underrepresented students each year for summer research internships. Committed to fostering science education in the community, he gives talks each year to elementary and high school students, and has presented three public lectures in the “Ask a Scientist” series in San Francisco.

McKerrow has co-authored more than a dozen book chapters, published more than 250 articles and has been a keynote speaker at numerous conferences and symposia. His many honors range from teaching awards spanning more than two decades at UCSF to the Gregor Mendel Honorary Medal from the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and the 2005 Distinguished Alumnus Award from SUNY, Stony Brook.

He is a member of the American Society for Cell Biology, American Society of Microbiology, American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, American Society of Parasitologists, and the American Society of Immunologists. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Chemical Biology and Drug Design and PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

In July 2000, the UC Board of Regents approved the establishment of the UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. The school matriculated the first class of 25 Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students in the fall of 2002. The steady-state enrollment is 240 Pharm.D. students, 60 Ph.D. students and 30 pharmacy residents. The school offers an innovative and flexible curriculum leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree, taught by a stellar health sciences faculty in close association with the outstanding clinical, research and academic programs of the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

To learn more about the UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, click here.

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UCLA nursing school names acting dean


Linda Sarna will serve one-year term.

Linda Sarna, UCLA

Professor Linda Sarna, who holds the Lulu Wolf Hassenplug Chair in the UCLA School of Nursing, has been appointed acting dean of the School of Nursing as of July 1, 2014. She will serve a one-year term while Dean Courtney Lyder is on leave.

Sarna served as chair of the UCLA Academic Senate during the 2012–13 academic year, and she chairs the committee that implemented UCLA’s tobacco-free policy.

At UCLA and beyond, Sarna is recognized for her scholarship promoting the role of nursing in tobacco control and for her research on the symptoms and quality of life of people with lung cancer. As the principal investigator for the Tobacco Free Nurses Initiative and through her active involvement in tobacco-control policy efforts nationally and internationally, she has emphasized the need to change expectations for nursing education and clinical practice.

Sarna is the author of more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, books, chapters and other publications. Her numerous honors and awards include election as a fellow to the American Academy of Nursing and recognition as a distinguished research professor by the Oncology Nursing Society.  She has served on commissions and task forces for the National Cancer Institute, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Institute of Medicine and the University of California, among others. Sarna received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from UCLA, and her doctorate from UC San Francisco.

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UC Irvine names interim medical school dean


Eye surgeon Roger Steinert will begin his term July 1.

Roger Steinert, UC Irvine

Renowned eye surgeon Dr. Roger Steinert has been named interim dean of the UC Irvine School of Medicine. The current Irving H. Leopold Chair in Ophthalmology and founding director of the Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, he will oversee the academic and research missions of the medical school.

Steinert came to UC Irvine in 2004 as professor of clinical ophthalmology and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He’s a pioneer in laser surgery, most notably in LASIK and excimer laser refractive surgery and in corneal transplantation, developing techniques that have improved the vision of millions.

Steinert has repeatedly been recognized for advancing eye care, including being named one of America’s top ophthalmologists by Becker’s ASC Review and receiving the 2008 Barraquer Award, refractive surgery’s highest honor. The UCI Academic Senate honored him with the Distinguished Faculty Award for Teaching in 2008-09.

Steinert also serves as chief of ophthalmology at UC Irvine Medical Center, where he’s the current president of the medical staff and has been a member of the Governing Body Advisory Council since 2009. He helped lead the effort to establish UCI’s Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, Orange County’s only academic vision care institute, and oversaw the opening of the state-of-the-art, 70,000-square-foot research and clinical facility on campus last September.

Steinert follows Dr. Ralph V. Clayman, the medical school’s dean for the past five years. One of the nation’s premiere urologists and founding chair of the Department of Urology, Clayman will return to the faculty and his clinical practice at UCI. During his tenure as dean, he welcomed 12 new department chairs and a new cancer center director; student applications increased by 25 percent; and he oversaw the creation of the iMedEd Initiative, the first medical education program in the country to incorporate tablet computing, Google Glass and portable ultrasound into academic and clinical training.

Steinert will begin his term as interim dean July 1.

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UCLA, MPTF complete health system integration


Entertainment industry members to get access to UCLA’s specialty care and services.

The transition of the Motion Picture and Television Fund outpatient health care system into the UCLA Health System has been finalized, Dr. David Feinberg, president of the UCLA Health System, and Bob Beitcher, president and CEO of MPTF, announced today (June 2).

The plan for these two iconic Los Angeles institutions to combine forces, first announced in October 2013, was subsequently approved by the University of California Board of Regents and the MPTF Board of Directors.

“For the past seven months, we have been working very closely with a talented and committed team at UCLA Health led by Dr. Patricia Kapur, executive vice president of the UCLA Health System and CEO of the UCLA Faculty Practice Group, to bring MPTF’s outpatient health care system into the UCLA Health System constellation,” Beitcher said. “We have found Dr. Kapur and her team to be absolutely remarkable and feel very confident that with them we have figured out the best approach to future-proofing the delivery of high-quality health care to our entertainment industry community.”

“The partnership between these two institutions means that entertainment industry members and their families can continue to receive the highest-quality health care at MPTF facilities, with the added advantage of being able to access UCLA’s world-renowned specialty care and inpatient services,” said Feinberg, who is also CEO of the UCLA Hospital System. “UCLA’s commitment to operating the health centers exclusively for the use of entertainment industry members, with the same physician group and the same clinical staff at the same locations that MPTF members have come to rely on is a positive outcome for all.”

“The UCLA Health System is enthusiastically looking forward to welcoming the MPTF ambulatory health-delivery system, its expert physicians, its dedicated staff and its important referring physician network to our clinical care team,” said Kapur. “UCLA already has much in common with our MPTF colleagues in the way we deliver care, with a patient-centered approach being a fundamental principle of both organizations. We all anticipate a smooth integration of the MPTF health care teams.”

The outpatient health system will be co-branded by the UCLA Health System and MPTF and will operate out of the five existing MPTF health centers with the same primary care physician group and clinical staff serving the entertainment industry exclusively. Dr Janice Spinner, current chief medical officer of MPTF, will assume the same role with the UCLA Health System.

In addition to the five outpatient health centers, UCLA will operate MPTF’s Health Wheels mobile medical vehicle, which drives directly onto studio lots to deliver care; the Age Well program; physical therapy; and the medical component of the palliative care program. UCLA Health System will also continue to operate MPTF’s Bridge to Health program, which offers a low-cost medical visit for entertainment industry members who are uninsured or underinsured.

MPTF will continue to own and operate the renowned Motion Picture Country Home in Woodland Hills, along with its 40-bed skilled nursing facility, 30-bed Alzheimer’s unit, Harry’s Haven, the soon-to-open Samuel Goldwyn Jr. Center for Behavioral Health, and its many social services programs for industry members of all ages with critical needs.

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UCSF celebrates 150 years of innovations


Year of events will include “Discovery Talks,” TEDMED and opening of three new hospitals.

A trolley passes through the early Parnassus campus.

UC San Francisco has launched a yearlong celebration to mark its 150th anniversary as a health sciences innovator and pioneer, with a history of contributions ranging from the first mail-order pharmacy (by stagecoach) to Nobel Prize-winning discoveries and the birth of biotechnology.

Since its founding in 1864, UCSF’s story has included providing health care for California miners and for San Francisco residents displaced by the 1906 earthquake; graduating the first woman doctor in California; forming both the first West Coast dental school and the California Pharmaceutical Society; helping establish nursing as a professional field that is integral to medical care; and providing a model of health sciences research and education that shaped the University of California.

UCSF’s sesquicentennial celebration will include the October opening of the Global Health Sciences building at Mission Bay in San Francisco, the release of UCSF’s new 20-year Long-Range Development Plan, and the opening of three specialty hospitals to serve children, women and cancer patients at Mission Bay in February 2015.

It also will include events and lectures that are open to the public, including Discovery Talks by UCSF scientists on May 31; a TEDMED conference in September, for which UCSF is the event’s first global partner; and serving once again as the scientific host of the Bay Area Science Festival in November. Events and a timeline of contributions can be found on a Web portal commemorating the people and events of UCSF’s past, present and future.

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The future of UC Health


UC medical centers need to work together to leverage their scale.

John Stobo

By Alec Rosenberg

The University of California’s five academic medical centers need to pick up the pace in their working together as a system to improve quality and reduce costs.

That’s the message UC Health Senior Vice President John Stobo delivered to UC Regents at their May 15 meeting in Sacramento.

With reimbursement for clinical services under enormous downward pressure, decreasing the costs associated with providing those services is critical, Stobo said. Without action, UC medical center expenses are projected to exceed revenues in 2017. That would have a significant effect on UC Health: The financial success of UC medical centers helps sustain UC Health’s three-part mission of clinical care, research and education, including pivotal support to UC’s medical schools.

“While each medical center needs to do what it can individually to contain costs, only by working together and leveraging the scale we have as a system can we collectively contain costs to adjust to the decreases in revenue,” Stobo said. “It’s time for us to look at a new model.”

A new model

Hospitals traditionally have relied on volume-based growth for profitability – that is, they were paid more for doing more, Stobo said. With health care reform, the focus is shifting to value. The hospitals that do best on quality, prevention and collaboration are the ones that will succeed in the future. UC has done well under that first model, but it needs to move quickly to position itself for this new reality.

“I’m convinced that we need to move from a volume-based to a value-based model in which we’re not the sum of five individual medical campuses but we act as an integrated health system,” Stobo said.

UC’s five academic medical centers – Davis, Irvine, UCLA, San Diego and San Francisco – already have started on that path through joint contracting, group purchasing and quality improvement projects.

In March, UC announced a “Leveraging Scale for Value” project to reduce costs at UC hospitals. In 2010, UC created a Center for Health Quality and Innovation to support innovations at UC medical center campuses and hospitals that seek to achieve the “triple aim” of better patient care and better population health while better controlling costs of care. The center, which held its third colloquium May 2, has funded about 50 grant and fellow projects from throughout UC Health and convened systemwide collaborations from fetal treatment to heart surgery.

Staying ahead

Regents praised UC’s efforts to be proactive and deal with the issue before it becomes a crisis.

“It’s gratifying to see that you are ahead of the curve,” Regent Sherry Lansing said. “The culture has changed, and we will maintain the quality and profitability.”

UC’s five academic medical centers had combined revenue of $7.5 billion in 2013. Add in the impact of UC’s 17 health professional schools, and UC Health accounts for nearly half of UC’s overall budget.

UC medical center revenue has increased steadily in the past five years, rising from $5 billion in 2008, but that pace is not expected to continue amid declining reimbursements for clinical services. Meanwhile, costs are rising at an unsustainable rate, putting more pressure on UC Health to act so it can continue to meet its three-part mission, Stobo said.

Much is at stake. UC’s academic medical centers play a critical role in the community, providing $444 million of charity care, 50 percent of California’s transplant surgeries and 25 percent of the state’s extensive burn care. UC’s medical centers also are vital to UC’s research efforts and provide significant support to other UC entities such as its medical schools – more than $900 million in 2013.

“It’s a big challenge,” Stobo said.

Leveraging scale

The Leveraging Scale for Value project will be overseen by a UC Health Shared Services Management Council made up of the five UC medical center CEOs, three medical school deans, two chancellors, one regent, three external expert advisers and Stobo.

The project initially aims to save in the range of $100 million to $150 million a year by collaborating on supply chain, revenue cycle and clinical laboratories. Along with maximizing efficiencies in those three initiatives, UC Health will need to address additional areas such an information technology and human resources to take $900 million out of its costs by 2020, Stobo said.

Gov. Jerry Brown said he viewed those cost strategies “with trepidation,” pointing to the challenges the state is facing with increased Medi-Cal enrollment.

Stobo noted that other large health systems have had success in leveraging their scale to reduce costs, and so too must UC Health.

“We’re serious about this issue of making sure our expenses don’t outstrip our revenues,” Stobo said. “The incentive is, if you don’t change, you go away.”

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