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Faculty, regent join American Academy of Arts and Sciences

New members from seven UC campuses.

A. Eugene Washington, UCLA

Twenty-five University of California faculty and researchers are among the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ class of 2014, announced today (April 23). In addition, UC Regent Sherry Lansing is among the 204 new members.

One of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies, the academy is also a leading center for independent policy research. Members contribute to academy publications and studies of science and technology policy, energy and global security, social policy and American institutions, and the humanities, arts and education.

UC members, by campus, include:

Berkeley

  • George Breslauer, executive vice chancellor and provost and professor of political science (retired)
  • Nicholas Dirks, chancellor
  • Edward Frenkel, professor of mathematics
  • Inez Fung, professor of atmospheric science
  • Robert Reich, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy
  • Daniel Tătaru, professor of mathematics
  • Alex Zettl, professor of physics

Davis

  • Margaret Ferguson, distinguished professor of English
  • Robert Huckfeldt, distinguished professor of political science
  • John Wingfield, distinguished professor and endowed chair in physiology

Irvine

  • Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, distinguished professor of English and comparative literature

UCLA

  • Chris Burden, professor emeritus of art
  • Johanna Ruth Drucker, Bernard and Martin Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies
  • Louis M. Gomez, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Professor of Digital Media and Learning
  • Patricia Marks Greenfield, distinguished professor of psychology
  • Sabeeha Merchant, distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry
  • Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, dean of the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and distinguished professor of education
  • A. Eugene Washington, vice chancellor for health sciences; dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine; CEO of the UCLA Health System; and distinguished professor of gynecology and health policy
  • Paul Storch Weiss, director, California NanoSystems Institute; Fred Kavli Professor of Nanosystems Sciences; and distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and of materials science and engineering

San Diego

  • Christopher Glass, professor of medicine and of cellular and molecular medicine
  • Clifford Kubiak, distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry

San Francisco

  • Warner Craig Greene, professor, medicine, microbiology and immunology; Nick and Sue Hellman Distinguished Professor of Translational Medicine; director and senior investigator, Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology; and co-director, UCSF-GIVI Center for AIDS Research
  • Jaime Sepulveda, executive director, UCSF Global Health Sciences and professor of epidemiology

Santa Barbara

  • Catherine Albanese,  J.F. Rowny Professor Emerita in Comparative Religions
  • Anthony Zee, professor of physics

This year’s class brings UC’s membership in the academy to 489.

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UC Global Health Day to be April 26

UC Davis hosting annual event.

UC Davis and the University of California Global Health Institute will host global health leaders from California and beyond on Saturday, April 26, during the fourth annual UC Global Health Day.

Topics ranging from global health diplomacy, maternal and child health, animal health, emerging infectious diseases, economics, migrant health, and more will be presented by faculty and students from across the 10-campus University of California system.

Keynote speakers will include UC President Janet Napolitano, former U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and governor of Arizona.

“When we talk about global health, we are speaking about the health of people not only in developing countries, but also throughout the United States,” Napolitano said. “With five medical centers, world-class health research initiatives and top-ranked educational programs, the University of California is making an enormous impact on the health of populations across the world, including people in need right here in California.”

The annual event, being hosted by UC Davis, rotates among the UC campuses. Past events have taken place at Irvine, Berkeley and Riverside.

“Global health is an increasingly popular field of study at UC Davis and we are thrilled to be hosting UC Global Health Day this year,” said UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, who will give welcoming remarks at the event. “Because of our particular strengths in agriculture, medicine, veterinary medicine and engineering, UC Davis is uniquely positioned to address the biggest challenges of health worldwide.”

Registration for UC Global Health Day is open until April 22: $50 general admission; $25 for students. For more information, visit the UCGHI website at: www.ucghi.universityofcalifornia.edu/index.aspx.

Two UC Davis professors — Andrew Hargadon, the Charles J. Soderquist chair in entrepreneurship at the Graduate School of Management, and Jonna Mazet, director of the One Health Institute in the School of Veterinary Medicine —  will jointly present a talk on “How Breakthroughs Happen.” Jonathan Samet, director of the Institute of Global Health at the University of Southern California, will speak about “Moving beyond Global Tobacco Control to Global Noncommunicable Disease Control.”

Students and faculty from every UC campus will be in attendance at the all-day event, which will also feature 60 poster presentations and 16 breakout sessions, covering a broad range of global health topics, including:

  • Migration and Human Trafficking in the Pacific Rim;
  • Innovation and Infrastructure for Slum Health: Advancing Technology to Work in Low-Resource Settings;
  • 21st Century Global Health Diplomacy;
  • Working Globally at the Human-Animal Interface to Improve Health for All; and
  • Measuring Women’s Empowerment through Participatory Action.

See a video about the 2013 UC Global Health Day at http://youtu.be/3s5KbWfPU9E.

The UC Global Health Institute was established in November 2009 in response to the growing demand from students and faculty interested in global health research and education. The UCGHI convenes people from across the UC system to collaborate on research projects, and provides education and training opportunities through workshops, courses, lectures and other events. The UCGHI is composed of three multi-campus Centers of Expertise — Migration & Health; One Health; and Women’s Health & Empowerment. These centers lead education and training programs to produce leaders and practitioners of global health, conduct innovative research, and develop international partnerships to improve the health of vulnerable people and communities in California and worldwide.

Patricia Conrad, a professor in the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, is co-director of the One Health Center of Expertise and led the planning for 2014 UC Global Health Day.

“It’s exciting to see the enthusiasm for global health at UC Davis and across the UC campuses,” Conrad said. “The diversity of presentations at this year’s event, and the cross-section of disciplines of the faculty and student participants, is quite remarkable.”

The UC Global Health Institute is jointly led by director Haile Debas, former chancellor and dean of the School of Medicine at UC San Francisco, and Thomas Coates, the Michael and Sue Steinberg professor of global AIDS research at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and director of the UCLA Center for World Health. The institute has received $4 million in funding from the Chan Soon-Shiong Family Foundation and $4 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in addition to funds from the UC Office of the President.

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Private partnerships for public benefit

Nobel laureate’s research into neurodegenerative diseases gets boost from Japanese firm.

Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner (left), director of the UCSF Institute of Neurodegenerative Diseases, recently launched a partnership with pharmaceutical company Daiichi Sankyo that will accelerate his research into prion diseases. He credits the partnership largely to groundwork laid by IND’s associate director, David Ramsay (right).

Stanley Prusiner, M.D., is used to overcoming challenges in his career.

In 1982, as a UC San Francisco junior faculty member in the Department of Neurology, Prusiner published an article describing his discovery of an unprecedented class of pathogens that he named “prions.” These infectious proteins are now understood to be involved in numerous neurodegenerative diseases in humans and animals, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, frontotemporal dementia and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

The article sparked a firestorm at the time.

Prusiner’s contention that a protein alone could be infectious flew in the face of the commonly held scientific belief that infections could only be transmitted by viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites – all of which have genomes composed of either DNA or RNA. Proteins, however, are composed of amino acids.

Despite what he described as a “torrent of criticism” from the scientific community, the media and even funders of his research, Prusiner remained undeterred. He took comfort in the unwavering support of close colleagues, and mounting scientific evidence – much of it stemming his UCSF lab – that backed his claims.

The groundbreaking work led to Prusiner’s 1997 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

“People often ask me why I persisted in doing research on a subject that was so controversial,” Prusiner said in his Nobel acceptance speech. “I frequently respond by telling them that only a few scientists are granted the great fortune to pursue topics that are so new and different that only a small number of people can grasp [their] meaning initially.”

In the decades since his discovery, Prusiner – now director of the Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases (IND) at UCSF – has been committed to getting answers about prion diseases, and ultimately treatments and cures.

Even with a Nobel Prize under his belt, the road continues to pose challenges.

Federal funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been crucial to his research, but the recent recession – and resulting sequestration – highlighted the need to strengthen relationships with private industry. In 2013, the NIH awarded a total of $22.5 billion in funding to U.S. institutions, the lowest amount since 2003.

But this month, Prusiner’s work got a huge boost from an exciting new collaboration between the IND and the Japan-based global pharmaceutical company Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd. It will focus on developing therapeutics and molecular diagnostics for multiple neurodegenerative diseases.

“Alzheimer’s alone kills as many people every year as cancer does, but it only receives one-tenth of the funding that we dedicate to cancer research. This collaboration won’t fill that funding gap, but it will offer the tremendous value of Daiichi Sankyo’s scientific expertise to make progress on these diseases,” he said.

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UCSF celebrating 150 years in health and science

Campus honors past, focused on future.

Hugh Toland joined a California-bound wagon train in 1852 with visions of striking it rich in the Gold Rush.

It only took a few months before the South Carolina surgeon abandoned prospecting, seeing a better opportunity in providing health care to a raucous and booming San Francisco. By 1864, Toland Medical College was born, and less than a decade later, it became the “medical department” of a fledgling University of California.

Though Toland might not have found the exact fortune he was seeking out West, he left a legacy that has enriched future generations in ways far greater than he could have imagined.

Today UC San Francisco is one of the top health sciences universities, encompasses more than 20 locations throughout San Francisco and is leading a charge to advance health worldwide. From its humble beginnings in the Wild West to this year’s 150th anniversary celebration, UCSF has been a testament to how the best research, the best education and the best patient care can converge to create life-changing breakthroughs.

UCSF’s sesquicentennial, which officially launches on Founders Day on April 10 and continues through May 2015, will be a yearlong celebration filled with special events on campus and in the community.

While anniversaries are a time to look back at accomplishments, the goal of this celebration also will be to recognize that UCSF has always been focused on the future, says Mary Anne Koda-Kimble, Pharm.D., chair of the 150th Celebration Committee and dean emeritus of the UCSF School of Pharmacy.

“The culture of the place is about excellence, moving forward and seeking new frontiers,” she says.

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Spinal stimulation helps four paraplegic men move their legs

UCLA involved in study of breakthrough therapy.

Patient Kent Stephenson voluntarily raises his leg.

Four young men who have been paralyzed for years achieved groundbreaking progress — moving their legs — as a result of epidural electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, an international team of life scientists reports today in the medical journal Brain.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Louisville, UCLA and the Pavlov Institute of Physiology, was funded in part by the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

All four participants were classified as suffering from chronic, motor complete spinal cord injuries and were unable to move their lower extremities prior to the implantation of an epidural stimulator. The stimulator delivers a continuous electrical current to the participants’ lower spinal cords, mimicking signals the brain normally transmits to initiate movement.

The research builds on an initial study, published in May 2011 in the journal The Lancet, that evaluated the effects of epidural stimulation in the first participant, Rob Summers of Portland, Ore., who recovered a number of motor functions as a result of the intervention.

Now, three years later, the key findings documented in Brain detail the impact of epidural stimulation in a total four participants, including new tests conducted on Summers. Summers was paralyzed after being struck by a vehicle, and the other three participants were paralyzed in auto or motorcycle accidents.

What is revolutionary, the scientists said, is that the second, third and fourth participants — Kent Stephenson of Mt. Pleasant, Texas; Andrew Meas of Louisville, Ky.; and Dustin Shillcox of Green River, Wyo. — were able to execute voluntary movements immediately following the implantation and activation of the stimulator.

The participants’ results and recovery time were unexpected, which led researchers to speculate that some pathways may be intact post-injury and therefore able to facilitate voluntary movements.

“Two of the four subjects were diagnosed as motor and sensory complete injured with no chance of recovery at all,” said lead author Claudia Angeli, a senior researcher with the Human Locomotor Research Center at Frazier Rehab Institute and an assistant professor at University of Louisville’s Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC). “Because of epidural stimulation, they can now voluntarily move their hips, ankles and toes. This is groundbreaking for the entire field and offers a new outlook that the spinal cord, even after a severe injury, has great potential for functional recovery.”

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Medical students celebrate their matches

Graduating students learn where their careers as doctors will start.

UC Davis medical student Alexis Gaskin matched to Howard University.

Jumps for joy. Hugs for happiness.

March 21 was a day to celebrate for more than 650 University of California medical students: Match Day 2014, when future doctors found out which hospital accepted them for residency to get advanced training in their chosen specialty.

“This day is like all my dreams come true,” said Alexis Gaskin, a fourth-year UC Davis medical student from Vacaville, who matched in orthopedics at Howard University in Washington, D.C.  “Being able to visualize it [the match letter], to see it in my hand is really a dream come true.”

UC Irvine medical student Givenchy Manzano is embraced by his mother, Mary Jane Manzano, as his brother Wilfred looks on.

At UC Davis, 96 graduating medical students matched. At UC Irvine, 100 students matched. At UCLA, 183 students matched. UC San Diego had 116 students match. UC San Francisco had 157 students match.

This year, more than 16,000 U.S. allopathic medical school seniors matched to first-year residency positions – a match rate of 94.4 percent. A computer algorithm from the National Resident Matching Program matches the preferences of applicants with the preferences of residency programs at teaching hospitals throughout the country. The students from allopathic schools such as UC apply for the available residency positions along with thousands of independent applicants, including osteopathic students and graduates of foreign medical schools. Overall, more than 40,000 individuals applied for nearly 30,000 residency slots across the country.

UCLA's Sarah Neyssani will do her residency at Harbor-UCLA Med Center.

While UC students matched with residency programs across the country, around two-thirds will stay in California for their training, including at UC medical centers, helping to address local needs for physicians. More than 69 percent of the physicians who do residency training in California remain in the state to practice – the nation’s highest retention rate.

“I could not be happier with where I matched, and am so excited to go on this adventure with these amazing people,” said UC San Francisco graduating medical student Gabe Sudario, who will continue at UC San Francisco for his residency.

UC San Diego medical students pinpoint their matches

“We are all nervous about Match Day,” said Inga Wilder, a senior at UC San Diego School of Medicine. “It’s the uncertainty. You can’t plan anything. But I am graduating. I am going to be a doctor in a couple months. I can’t complain.”

Wilder, 30, has reason to be proud. She grew up in Compton, and she and her brother, who joined her at Match Day, were the first in their family to graduate from college. Wilder, a high school valedictorian, went to UC Berkeley and originally planned to get a Ph.D. in microbiology before experience in a lab convinced her she was “more of a people person.”

To break up the tension of the day, many of UCSF's medical students dressed up in costumes, including Gabe Sudario (center in green) who landed a residency at UCSF.

Standing beside her brother, she opened her envelope and smiled: “I got my first choice,” she beamed, a residency in full-spectrum family medicine at the Ventura County Medical Center, helping underserved communities.

For more coverage of Match Day, view these links:

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In the media: Week of April 20

A sampling of news media stories involving UC Health:

Study: Codeine prescribed for kids despite risks, ABC 7

A new study out of UCSF is suggesting that the potent painkiller codeine is being prescribed for too many children, despite warnings that the drug can cause an accidental overdose.

Blood-pressure drug prevents epilepsy after brain injury, BGU research finds, Jerusalem Post

A commonly used prescription drug for high blood pressure has been found to prevent epileptic attacks after concussion. The findings are according to a new study on rats by researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, the University of California at Berkeley and Charité-University Medicine in Germany.

UC OKs paying surgeon $10 million in whistleblower-retaliation case, Los Angeles Times

University of California regents agreed to pay $10 million to the former chairman of UCLA’s orthopedic surgery department, who had alleged that the well-known medical school allowed doctors to take industry payments that may have compromised patient care. The settlement reached Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court came just before closing arguments were due to begin in a whistleblower-retaliation case brought by Dr. Robert Pedowitz, 54, a surgeon who was recruited to UCLA in 2009 to run the orthopedic surgery department.

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Stroke treatment, outcomes improve at hospitals taking part in UCLA-led initiative

Study finds jump in patients receiving clot-busting drug within “golden hour.”

Gregg Fonarow, UCLA

Administering a clot-dissolving drug to stroke victims quickly — ideally within the first 60 minutes after they arrive at a hospital emergency room — is crucial to saving their lives, preserving their brain function and reducing disability.

Given intravenously, tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) is currently the only Food and Drug Administration–approved therapy shown to improve outcomes for patients suffering acute ischemic stroke, which affects some 800,000 Americans annually.

Now, a UCLA-led study demonstrates that hospitals participating in the “Target: Stroke” national quality-improvement program have markedly increased the speed with which they treat stroke patients with tPA. Researchers looked at more than 1,000 hospitals participating in the initiative, which was conceived by UCLA faculty and is conducted in collaboration with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The findings of the study are published in today’s (April 23) issue of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The researchers report that at participating hospitals, the average time it took to deliver tPA to patients fell from 74 minutes to 59 minutes. This speedier treatment, they said, was accompanied by improved outcomes, including reduced mortality, fewer treatment complications and a greater likelihood that patients would go home after leaving the hospital instead of being referred to a skilled nursing facility for advanced rehabilitation.

“These findings reinforce the importance and clinical benefits of faster administration of intravenous tPA. Through this national initiative, more patients were able to be treated with this beneficial therapy and in a safer, more effective fashion,” said first author Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, UCLA’s Eliot Corday Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science and director of the Ahmanson–UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

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Community-based weight loss program aids diabetes management

Majority of participants in trial lost weight and reduced medication use.

Cheryl Rock, UC San Diego

Weight loss and control of blood sugar can reduce the risk of complications in patients with diabetes, but this is difficult for many to achieve. A UC San Diego School of Medicine randomized controlled trial of obese adults with type 2 diabetes suggests that participants enrolled in a community-based structured weight loss program are able to shed more pounds, improve blood sugar control and reduce or eliminate insulin use and other medications compared to a control group.

“Support and a tailored lifestyle intervention have been shown to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors and adverse outcomes in people with diabetes,” said Cheryl L. Rock, Ph.D., R.D., professor of family and preventive medicine and principal investigator of the study. “However, most overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes do not receive this degree of support for changes in diet and physical activity to promote weight loss in their clinical care, due in part to constraints of time and training for most health care providers and clinicians.”

The results of the study, published in today’s (April 23) online issue of Diabetes Care, found that 72 percent of participants on the weight loss program that included portion-controlled foods and personalized counseling were able to change their insulin use compared with 8 percent of the control group. Similarly, other diabetes, cholesterol and blood pressure drugs were decreased or discontinued more often among the weight loss program enrollees.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 35 percent of adults in the United States are obese and 8 percent of adults are affected by diabetes.

“Weight loss is a primary strategy for successful management of type 2 diabetes due to its impact on glycemic control and improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors,” said Rock. “These study results suggest that patients not only lose weight on structured commercial weight loss programs that include behavioral modification and individual support, but that this weight loss translates to significant improvements in diabetes control and cardio-metabolic parameters.”

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Blood-pressure drug prevents epilepsy after brain injury

Drug may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those with epilepsy.

Daniela Kaufer, UC Berkeley

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy.

A team of researchers from UC Berkeley, Ben-Gurion University in Israel and Charité-University Medicine in Germany reports in the current issue of the journal Annals of Neurology that a commonly used hypertension drug prevents a majority of cases of post-traumatic epilepsy in a rodent model of the disease. If independent experiments now under way in rats confirm this finding, human clinical trials could start within a few years.

“This is the first-ever approach in which epilepsy development is stopped, as opposed to common drugs that try to prevent seizures once epilepsy develops,” said co-author Daniela Kaufer, UC Berkeley associate professor of integrative biology and a member of the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute. “Those drugs have a very limited success and many side effects, so we are excited about the new approach.”

The team, led by Kaufer; neurosurgeon Alon Friedman, associate professor of physiology and neurobiology at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; and Uwe Heinemann of the Charite, provides the first explanation for how brain injury caused by a blow to the head, stroke or infection leads to epilepsy. Based on 10 years of collaborative research, their findings point a finger at the blood-brain barrier – the tight wall of cells lining the veins and arteries in the brain that is breached after trauma.

“This study for the first time offers a new mechanism and an existing, FDA-approved drug to potentially prevent epilepsy in patients after brain injuries or after they develop an abnormal blood-brain barrier,” Friedman said.

The drug, losartan (Cozaar), prevented seizures in 60 percent of the rats tested, when normally 100 percent of the rats develop seizures after injury. In the 40 percent of rats that did develop seizures, they averaged about one quarter the number of seizures typical for untreated rats. Another experiment showed that administration of losartan for three weeks at the time of injury was enough to prevent most cases of epilepsy in normal lab rats in the following months.

“This is a very exciting result, telling us that the drug worked to prevent the development of epilepsy and not by suppressing the symptoms,” Kaufer said.

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Children with Down syndrome have better heart surgery outcomes

Mortality rates for congenital heart disease repairs are lower in kids with Down syndrome.

Jacqueline Evans, UC Davis

Researchers at UC Davis Children’s Hospital have shown that children with Down syndrome have significantly better in-hospital survival rates after surgeries for congenital heart disease (CHD) than their genetically typical peers.

While post-surgical mortality rates for children with Down syndrome have been studied before, this is by far the most comprehensive effort to date. Using the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID), the researchers looked at results from almost 80 different procedures, performed on more than 50,000 children across the United States during 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2009.

The overall in-hospital mortality rate for children with Down children was 1.9 percent as compared with 4.3 percent for children without Down syndrome. The paper was published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

“We’ve known for some time that children with Down syndrome do better after certain procedures,” said lead author Jacqueline Evans, assistant professor at UC Davis Children’s Hospital. “But even when you correct for surgical risk, prematurity, the presence of a major non-cardiac structural abnormality and age at the time of surgery, children with Down syndrome have lower in-hospital mortality rates across a wide spectrum of repairs.”

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Risk of pregnancy greater with newer method of female sterilization

Study provides “essential information” for women, doctors discussing permanent sterilization.

Mitchell Creinin, UC Davis

The risk of pregnancy among women using a newer method of planned sterilization called hysteroscopic sterilization is more than 10 times greater over a 10-year period than using the more commonly performed laparoscopic sterilization, a study by researchers at Yale University and UC Davis has found.

Published online today (April 22) in the medical journal Contraception, the study found the higher risk of pregnancy with a newer sterilization method marketed under the brand name Essure.

“This study provides essential information for women and their doctors discussing permanent sterilization,” said lead study author Aileen Gariepy, assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the Yale School of Medicine.

Female surgical sterilization is the most popular method of pregnancy prevention worldwide and the most commonly used method of contraception among women age 35 and older in the United States. Each year, 345,000 U.S. women undergo sterilization procedures, and a total of 10.3 million U.S. women rely on female sterilization for pregnancy prevention.

Hysteroscopic sterilization is a multistep process that requires women to have a procedure to place coils inside the opening of the Fallopian tubes, use another method of contraception for three months after the procedure, and then have a special X-ray test in which dye is pushed into the uterus to confirm whether the tubes are blocked.

“When Essure was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2002, data presented to physicians and patients only included those women who successfully completed all of the steps to be sterilized using the procedure,” said study co-author Mitchell Creinin, professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the UC Davis School of Medicine.

“However, physicians quickly realized that at least 1 in 10 women would not be able to have the coils placed and that many would not return for follow-up testing,” he said.

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Match Day at UC San Diego School of Medicine

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