CATEGORY: Spotlight

Randy Schekman wins Nobel Prize in Medicine

UC Berkeley professor is UC’s 13th Nobelist in medicine.

As photographers capture the moment -- and UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks savors it -- Nobel Prize winner Randy Schekman takes a congratulatory call from UC President Janet Napolitano. (Photo by Peg Skorpinski, UC Berkeley)

As photographers capture the moment -- and UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks savors it -- Nobel Prize winner Randy Schekman takes a congratulatory call from UC President Janet Napolitano.

Randy W. Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley, has won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his role in revealing the machinery that regulates the transport and secretion of proteins in our cells. He shares the prize with James E. Rothman of Yale University and Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University.

Discoveries by Schekman about how yeast secrete proteins led directly to the success of the biotechnology industry, which was able to coax yeast to release useful protein drugs, such as insulin and human growth hormone. The three scientists’ research on protein transport in cells, and how cells control this trafficking to secrete hormones and enzymes, illuminated the workings of a fundamental process in cell physiology.

Randy Schekman will share the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (Photo by Peg Skorpinski, UC Berkeley)

Randy Schekman will share the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Schekman is UC Berkeley’s 22nd Nobel laureate, and the first to receive the prize in the area of physiology or medicine. A total of 60 faculty and researchers affiliated with the University of California have won 61 Nobel Prizes, including 13 in medicine.

In a statement, the 50-member Nobel Assembly lauded Rothman, Schekman and Südhof for making known “the exquisitely precise control system for the transport and delivery of cellular cargo. Disturbances in this system have deleterious effects and contribute to conditions such as neurological diseases, diabetes, and immunological disorders.”

“My first reaction was, ‘Oh, my god!’ said Schekman, 64, who was awakened at his El Cerrito home with the good news at 1:30 a.m. “That was also my second reaction.”

Schekman and Rothman separately mapped out one of the body’s critical networks, the system in all cells that shuttles hormones and enzymes out and adds to the cell surface so it can grow and divide. This system, which utilizes little membrane bubbles to ferry molecules around the cell interior, is so critical that errors in the machinery inevitably lead to death.

“Ten percent of the proteins that cells make are secreted, including growth factors and hormones, neurotransmitters by nerve cells and insulin from pancreas cells,” said Schekman, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

In what some thought was a foolish decision, Schekman decided in 1976, when he first joined the College of Letters and Science at UC Berkeley, to explore this system in yeast. In the ensuing years, he mapped out the machinery by which yeast cells sort, package and deliver proteins via membrane bubbles to the cell surface, secreting proteins important in yeast communication and mating. Yeast also use the process to deliver receptors to the surface, the cells’ main way of controlling activities such as the intake of nutrients like glucose.

In the 1980s and ’90s, these findings enabled the biotechnology industry to exploit the secretion system in yeast to create and release pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes. Today, diabetics worldwide use insulin produced and discharged by yeast, and most of the hepatitis B vaccine used around the world is secreted by yeast. Both systems were developed by Chiron Corp. of Emeryville, now part of Novartis International AG, during the 20 years Schekman consulted for the company.

Various diseases, including some forms of diabetes and a form of hemophilia, involve a hitch in the secretion system of cells, and Schekman is now investigating a possible link to Alzheimer’s disease.

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One Response to “Randy Schekman wins Nobel Prize in Medicine”

  1. abdur rachim says:

    congratulation to professor Randy W. Schekman, thanks to his dedication to cell biology knowledge, hope he can continuing his research and finding more medicine for our health. Success to University of California

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