CATEGORY: News

Sleep loss leads to anxiety, poor food choices

UC Berkeley studies show further evidence of dangers of too little sleep.

Two studies presented at a meeting in Boston this week by researchers at UC Berkeley’s Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory, which is headed by Matthew Walker, associate professor of psychology and neuroscience, unveiled further evidence about the dangers of too little sleep.

In one study, fMRI scans on 18 healthy adults produced results that suggest that, when sleep deprived, the emotional centers of the brain trigger emotional dysfunction and risk. And the more naturally anxious a person is, the more vulnerable he or she is to the effects of lack of sleep. Andrea Goldstein, a graduate student at the lab, was the lead author of the study, “Tired, anxious and expecting the worst: The impact of sleep deprivation and anxiety on emotional brain anticipation.”

The second study used MRI scans on 23 healthy adults to show how sleep deprivation impairs regions of the brain where food choices are made. Lack of sleep significantly impaired the frontal lobe, which controls behavior and decision-making. Lead author Stephanie Greer, another graduate student in the lab, said the study, “MRI scans show how sleep loss affects the ability to choose proper foods,” may help shed light on the link between sleep loss and obesity.

The abstracts were presented at SLEEP 2012, the 26th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

Comments are closed.

Match Day at UC San Diego School of Medicine

Click video for closed captions, larger view

Connect with UC

UC for California   Follow UC News on Twitter   Follow UC on Facebook   Subscribe to UC Health RSS feed

Event Calendar

<<   April 2014   >>
S M T W T F S
12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930

UC Davis: Investigating liver cancer disparities

Click video for closed captions, larger view

Contact

We welcome your ideas and feedback. To subscribe or send comments or suggestions, please email alec.rosenberg@ucop.edu.